Sam Gale Rosen

Vermont Edition Producer

Sam Gale Rosen is a producer for Vermont Edition. He joined VPR in 2015 after working for six years at WBUR Boston as a producer for On Point.

Sam has also written for Newser.com and Let's Go travel guides. He graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in History and Literature. He was born and raised in Gloucester, Mass., and enjoys travel, cats, fiction, history, radio drama, frogs and peaches.

Ways to Connect

Angela Evancie / VPR

The new VPR poll shows a dead heat in the race for Governor between Democrat Sue Minter and Republican Phil Scott. This week we're talking to both candidates about the key issues of the race. Today we're joined by the Republican candidate: Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott.

Baona / iStock

There's a new push to get more Vermonters better educated. The goal is 70 percent of the population with a college or other post-secondary degree by 2025. 

daizuoxin / iStock

In the near future, the Green Mountain Care Board is expected to vote on a dramatic change in the way that health care providers are reimbursed, to reward quality of care, and not the quantity of services that are provided.

Angela Evancie / VPR

David Zuckerman is a Progressive Party state senator representing Chittenden County. He's both the Progressive and Democratic nominee for the position of Lieutenant Governor.

Patti Daniels / VPR

This week on Vermont Edition, we’re bringing you interviews with the candidates for U.S. Senate. Next up is Republican candidate Scott Milne.

Andrew Harnik / AP

Our Revolution is the organization founded by Bernie Sanders to carry on the priorities of his presidential campaign. We're getting an update on the group's work.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR/file

Miro Weinberger took office in 2012 and has now served as mayor of Burlington for over four years. We’re talking with Mayor Weinberger about the big issues facing Vermont's largest city - including the debate over downtown development, the affordable housing crunch, the school system, policing and more. 

Nina Keck / VPR file

After an often divisive debate here in Vermont, the U.S. State Department has given approval for up to 100 refugees — mostly Syrian — to settle in Rutland over the next year.

With fall already here and winter coming, it's the time of year many people start thinking about using their fireplaces or woodstoves. But what about those individuals who help make sure the chimney is in proper working order?

Damian Dovarganes / AP

Across the country and here in Vermont, police body cameras and the footage that they capture are spurring big debates: over transparency, privacy, the use of force and when and how footage should be released.

Andy Duback / Courtesy of UVM College of Medicine

Ever wonder what's going on in your teenager's mind? You may be about to find out a lot more. The University of Vermont is taking a leading role in a massive national study into the developing brains of 10,000 adolescents.

Angela Evancie / VPR

For the first time since 2010, Vermont has an open seat for lieutenant governor. We’ll talk to the Republican candidate, Randy Brock. We'll discuss health care reform, tax policy and more.

Meg Malone / VPR

Cardboard has been around since the early 1800s, but a couple of Vermonters who have been working with cardboard for awhile now have come up with a novel use of the old packaging material: building cardboard pinball machines.

"Steampunk" combines the style of the Victorian era with the futuristic ideas of writers like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells. Beginning on Friday, Springfield will be hosting its second annual Steampunk Festival.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Vermont is an eclectic place, and we're serving up an eclectic mix of topics in today's program - from technology that's changing the way we think about cardboard, to the fantasy sci-fi world of steampunk, to the serious work of protecting civil liberties.

Meg Malone; Patti Daniels / VPR

What do you think is the most memorable public art in Vermont? But before answering that, let's back up even a bit further – how does one define public art?

Courtesy of Kate Daloz

The 1970s were a time of huge change in Vermont, as the back-to-the land movement swept the country and communes dotted the state. We’re hearing stories from that era of transformation and looking at how 1970s counterculture shaped the state we know today.

Chris Goldberg / Flickr

Vermont is a pretty dog-friendly state. That’s great for pet-lovers, but can come with some issues as well. We’re looking at the ins, outs and etiquette of dogs in public places.

iStock

Are Vermont's independent doctors an endangered species? As the state's health care system continues to evolve, many independent physicians worry they'll be gobbled up by a few large organizations or simply left in the lurch.  We're talking about the current landscape for Vermont's independent doctors and looking at what the future may hold.

PeopleImages / iStock.com

Researchers are starting to take a closer look at what people are posting on social media and why – and they are finding some interesting things. 

Pages