Sam Gale Rosen

Vermont Edition Managing Editor

Sam Gale Rosen is managing editor for Vermont Edition. He joined VPR in 2015 after working for six years at WBUR Boston as a producer for On Point.

Sam studied history and literature at Harvard University and was born and raised in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Ways to Connect

The ACLU in several states is requesting that Greyhound stop allowing the border patrol to board their buses.
Appaloosa / Flickr

The U.S. Customs and Border patrol, pointing to federal law, says it has the right to board and conduct warrantless searches in any vehicle within a hundred miles of the U.S. border. Given Vermont's small size and its northern border with Canada, that means that a significant portion of Vermont falls within that zone. The ACLU of Vermont has joined the chapters of several states asking Greyhound to stop allowing agents to board its buses and ask passengers questions about their citizenship.

We're talking about food tourism in Vermont: how it's changing and what it means for the state.
Mark Goebel / Flickr

Vermont's farms and food-and-drink producers are pitching themselves to tourists - not just as the source of what's on the table, but as destinations in their own right. We're talking about food tourism, how it fits into the state's economy, and whom it benefits.

We're asking Sen. Patrick Leahy about some of the latest developments from Washington.
Jose Luis Magana / AP

Sen. Patrick Leahy joins us to talk about what the new national omnibus spending bill means for Vermont. Plus, the Mueller investigation and what may be coming on gun control - and we take your questions.

"The Battle of the Greeks and Trojans for the Corpse of Patroclus" by Antoine Wiertz
Wikimedia Commons

The stories of The Iliad and The Odyssey are separated from us by a gap of thousands of years. But they continue to have relevance to those who have lived through modern warfare. We're connecting with a veterans-only class at UVM that's studying and discussing the works of Homer - and how those ancient epics resonate with today's warriors.

The "News Done Right" web series claims to be made by Vermonters but may be being produced from outside of Vermont.
Screenshot from "News Done Right - Fan Club" YouTube channel

A series of satirical videos about Vermont politics attack local political figures from a particular point of view. They claim to be by Vermonters for Vermonters but may be produced out-of-state. It’s unclear who is paying for them, and the state attorney general's office has received a complaint that they constitute illegal electioneering.

Elephant tusks wait in a container before being destroyed by authorities in Vietnam.
Tran Van Minh / AP

In the past few weeks, we've seen the surprising recovery of UVM's stolen black rhinoceros horn, and a big decision out of the Trump administration allowing trophy hunters to bring some elephant and lion body parts into the country. We're talking with Laurel Neme, a local expert on wildlife and global wildlife trafficking about these new developments.

The stolen black rhinoceros horn has been returned intact to UVM.
Brian Jenkins / University of Vermont, courtesy

In April 2017, the University of Vermont discovered a black rhinoceros horn was stolen from Torey Hall.

Potentially worth hundreds of thousands of dollars on the black market, the horn has now — almost a year later — been found. But not in Vermont.

Comic book legend Stan Lee and actor Chadwick Boseman pose together at the LA premiere of "Black Panther."
Chris Pizzello / Invision/AP

With Black Panther roaring at the box office to become one of the top-grossing movies of all time, some hope it's the dawn of a new era of black representation in film. We're talking to Dartmouth professor Monica White Ndounou. She studies film and media and offers a cautionary take to the film's success, suggesting ways the structure and ideology of Hollywood need to change first.

A screenshot from one of Professor Bongard's videos shows a robot "dreaming" about how to move.
courtesy of Josh Bongard

In order to be as useful as possible, robots need to be able to think and act for themselves. But with that autonomy can come serious concerns about human safety. We're talking about teaching machines how to be smart and independent, without kicking off a robot uprising.

About 100 people filled Tracy Hall in Norwich for an informational town meeting on Monday night.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

An overwhelming majority of school budgets passed on Town Meeting Day, but the Scott administration says those budgets need be cut back further and placed in the hands of state policymakers.

Calais voters respond to a meeting to increase funding for battered women's shelter. We're talking about some of the results out of Town Meeting Day.
John Dillon / VPR

Before the glow fully fades, we're checking in with two reporters from VPR's team to talk about some of the results out of Town Meeting Day.

Vermont's gubernatorial race is beginning to take shape.
Angela Evancie / VPR

There's a big election on the horizon in Vermont. Parties will choose their candidates for Governor in an August primary, with the general election in November. It's still early, but the race is starting to take shape.

The emerald ash borer, an invasive insect, kills over 99 percent of ash trees. It's been found in Montpelier, and officials are planning a response.
U.S. Department of Agriculture

A long-expected, but still dreaded, moment has arrived. The emerald ash borer, a tree-killing insect that has decimated forests in other parts of the country, has finally been officially confirmed in Vermont. We’re talking to experts about what comes next and what can be done to mitigate the damage from these invasive pests.

Gov. Phil Scott says an anti-racism bill passed by the Legislature contains an unconstitutional provision. But though he vetoed the bill, he says he'll move forward voluntarily with an almost identical initiative.
Angela Evancie / VPR/file

The legislature is nearing its Town Meeting Day break. At this halfway mark, we're talking to top political reporters on the status of key bills, including gun control, education financing, paid family leave, raising the minimum wage and water quality efforts.

Angela McDevitt is being credited with helping to thwart what could have been a deadly school shooting in Vermont.
Angela McDevitt

On the day a shooter in Florida killed 17 people at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, 18-year old Jack Sawyer of Poultney, Vermont was allegedly texting with his friend Angela McDevitt. "That's fantastic. 100% support it" he is reported to have written about the Parkland shooting. "It's just natural selection, taken up a notch."

Gun control advocates demonstrate at the State House in Montpelier, on Tuesday Feb. 20, 2018.
Wilson Ring / AP

The conversation around gun control in Vermont has changed significantly in the days following the arrest of an 18-year-old for allegedly plotting a mass shooting in Fair Haven. Republican Gov. Phil Scott, who had resisted any changes to the state's gun laws, now has presented a set of proposals to tighten them, and lawmakers are already taking action. We’re talking about what might happen.

Senator Bernie Sanders joins us for an hour-long discussion and takes your calls.
Screenshot @BernieSanders Twitter

Senator Bernie Sanders joins Vermont Edition for a discussion about the Russia investigation, the immigration debate, the Trump budget, his recent comments on gun legislation and more.

The Vermont Statehouse with snow around it.
Henry Epp / VPR File

Last week the Vermont House of Representatives passed a resolution recognizing “the importance of the Black Lives Matter movement in the U.S. and Vermont Black communities.”

But Rep. Kiah Morris, a Democratic lawmaker from Bennington, told Vermont Edition she was stunned by some of her colleagues’ comments made before and after the resolution was passed.

Montpelier High School's raising of a 'Black Lives Matter' flag has met with strong reactions across the country.
Ian Noyes / for VPR

The raising of a Black Lives Matter flag at Montpelier High School made news across the country and garnered a range of reactions from support to anger. We're talking about the deeper meaning of that symbolic action and how people have viewed it locally, statewide and nationally.

House Speaker Mitzi Johnson joins "Vermont Edition" to discuss some of her priorities this legislative session.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

House Speaker Mitzi Johnson says passing a paid family leave bill this year is one of her top priorities.

We're talking with Speaker Johnson about that bill, plus education funding, water quality, the push for a higher minimum wage and other big issues.

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