Steve Zind

Senior Reporter & Special Projects Producer

Steve has been with VPR since 1994, first serving as host of VPR’s public affairs program and then as a reporter, based in Central Vermont. Many VPR listeners recognize Steve for his special reports from Iran, providing a glimpse of this country that is usually hidden from the rest of the world. Prior to working with VPR, Steve served as program director for WNCS for 17 years, and also worked as news director for WCVR in Randolph. A graduate of Northern Arizona University, Steve also worked for stations in Phoenix and Tucson before moving to Vermont in 1972. Steve has been honored multiple times with national and regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for his VPR reporting, including a 2011 win for best documentary for his report, Afghanistan's Other War.

Ways to Connect

While their counterparts in New Hampshire and Maine have approved the sale of FairPoint Communications, the Vermont Public Service Board is still reviewing it. 

Steve Zind / VPR

Beau Butchery and Bar, which opened in Montpelier in December, is yet another example of the growth of the local food movement. It’s also an effort to recapture the tradition of the neighborhood butcher shop.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

A news conference was held Wednesday at noon in Montpelier by House Speaker Mitzi Johnson and Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe to discuss the status of negotiations around Vermont teachers' health care and subsequently the Vermont state budget.

Steve Zind / VPR

An effort to preserve 22.5 acres of land just off the Randolph exit of Interstate 89 has just under a month to finish raising $1 million. 

A municipally owned Central Vermont internet provider has marked a milestone by repaying the nearly 500 local investors who funded its start-up.

Steve Zind / VPR

Last spring, analyses of five years of data revealed clear racial disparities in Vermont State Police traffic stops. But after conversations with the troopers whose stops showed the greatest disparities, state police officials say they’ve found no instances of implicit or explicit racial bias.

Steve Zind / VPR

A developer and conservation groups have reached an agreement that will preserve prime agricultural land at Exit 4 on Interstate 89, ending a controversial plan to build a large development at the Randolph Exit.

Aleksangel / iStock.com

Vermont lawmakers are considering a bill that would make the state the first in the nation to monitor the far-reaching activities of so-called "data brokers."

Courtesy: Vermont Creamery

A Vermont maker of goat cheese, cream and butter will be sold for an undisclosed sum. 

Allison Hooper and Bob Reese started Vermont Creamery 32 years ago at a farm in Brookfield, using $2,000 of their own money and a $4,000 loan from a church.

Weston Playhouse Theatre Company

Actor and former lawmaker Sam Lloyd died Friday at his home in Weston. Lloyd, who was 91, led a remarkably full civic and stage life.

deepblue4you / iStock.com

For the first time, traffic stop information for Vermont's local police and sheriff’s departments has been collected and posted online.

A small car sharing program in Montpelier is ending. The two-year pilot program, run by the non-profit CarShare Vermont in partnership with the state will end in April, after a 24-month trial.  

Steven Pappas / Times Argus

A number of Vermont communities took up Town Meeting resolutions in response to intensified deportations of undocumented immigrants and President Trump’s new order suspending all refugee resettlement and barring visas for citizens of six Muslim-majority countries.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermonters are taking to town halls and school gymnasiums to vote on local measures and choose candidates, and VPR is tracking decisions throughout the state.

Steve Zind / VPR

There’s always a demand for work gloves. If the only trick to selling them is to make sure they’re well-made, then Green Mountain Glove Company should be doing OK. But time and change have taken their toll on the Randolph manufacturer.

Courtesy Dede Cummings

Acclaimed Vermont author Howard Frank Mosher has died. Mosher, 74, succumbed to cancer Sunday morning at his home in Irasburg.

Imagery Copyright 2017 Google / Map data Copyright 2017 Google

A Northeast Kingdom pond is at the center of a debate over how much a local recreation center can use it if that use prevents others from being on the water.

vgm8383 / Flickr Creative Commons

The Washington-based Vermont State Society will not be marking the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump by holding a gala, as it has in the past.

Steve Zind / VPR file

It’s been six years since the guard completed its last major deployment and 1,500 men and women returned from Afghanistan.

A startup in South Burlington wants to get in on the ground floor of a coming revolution in small satellites. GreenScale Technologies is developing tiny propulsion systems for these small satellites.

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