Steve Zind

Senior Reporter & Special Projects Producer

Steve has been with VPR since 1994, first serving as host of VPR’s public affairs program and then as a reporter, based in Central Vermont. Many VPR listeners recognize Steve for his special reports from Iran, providing a glimpse of this country that is usually hidden from the rest of the world. Prior to working with VPR, Steve served as program director for WNCS for 17 years, and also worked as news director for WCVR in Randolph. A graduate of Northern Arizona University, Steve also worked for stations in Phoenix and Tucson before moving to Vermont in 1972. Steve has been honored multiple times with national and regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for his VPR reporting, including a 2011 win for best documentary for his report, Afghanistan's Other War.

Ways to Connect

Barrie Dunsmore speaks at a podrum with a VPR sign behind him at a VPR's 2014 commentator brunch.
VPR File

Journalist Barrie Dunsmore was a familiar face to national television audiences for 30 years, covering international news for ABC. For seven years he served as the network’s senior foreign correspondent.

Unions representing Consolidated Communications workers say they’ve reached tentative three-year contract agreements with the company that will avert a strike.

Unionized Consolidated Communications workers in northern New England have authorized their leaders to call a strike if ongoing contract negotiations with the company don’t succeed.

A close-up photograph of a European hornet on a piece of wood.
Simon002 / iStock

The first Vermont specimen of the large European hornet was found in the southern part of the state and identified last month by the Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation.

It’s no surprise that the lead story in this week’s Vermont Standard will be about the fire in downtown Woodstock Monday.

What may be surprising is that the local paper is publishing an issue at all. That’s because the building that burned contained the Standard’s offices.  

A Rutland girl and her mother were seriously injured in a tour boat explosion in the Bahamas on Saturday.

The Connecticut River.
Ric Cengeri / VPR File

Those who swim or boat on the Connecticut River and its tributaries can go online to check the water quality at their favorite spots.

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch stands looking at Justice Anthony Kennedy in April 2017.
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

Vermont’s congressional delegation reacted with concern today over the announcement by Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy that he will retire at the end of July.

David Hall.
Steve Zind / VPR file

A developer from Utah has abandoned his plans to build a futuristic utopia in the hills of central Vermont.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., on Capitol Hill in April 2017.
Alex Brandon / AP

Vermont's Congressional delegation is condemning a U.S. Supreme Court decision that upholds the Trump Administration’s ban on travel from five predominantly Muslim countries.

A brown cardboard box on a doormat in front of a wooden door.
Manuel-F-O / iStock

Vermont Tax Commissioner Kaj Samsom is hailing a U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing states to collect taxes for online purchases made by residents.  

Bottles of maple syrup are lined up on a table, their nutrion facts visible, while Rep. Peter Welch and Sen. Patrick Leahy stand in the background.
Lisa Rathke / Associated Press

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reconsidering a proposal requiring maple syrup and honey to carry labels saying they contain "added sugar."

This is a stock photo of chocolate malt ball candy similar to the ones police say employee of the Inn at Shelburne Farms mistakenly ate Wednesday. Instead of being candy, the food left behind by a guest were edibles.
Ilya_Starikov / iStock

Two employees of the Inn at Shelburne Farms became ill Wednesday morning after they ate marijuana edible candies left in a room by departing guests.

Courtesy, Green Mountain Club

The North Country National Scenic Trail is part dream, part reality. The dream is a continuous footpath running from central North Dakota to Maine. The reality is that about 2,000 miles of the 4,700-mile trail is currently on roads.

An aerial shot of a pop-up tiny house village
Liz Lavorgna, Core Photography / Courtesy

For the third year running, Brattleboro will be the site of a festival dedicated to tiny houses.

Julie Richards and Scott Baldwin of Burlington hold a sign urging voters to reject a ballot item that seeks to stop the basing of F-35s in Burlington
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR/file

The Air Force has rejected a request from the Burlington City Council to cancel plans to base F-35 fighter jets at Burlington International Airport, in South Burlington.

Toby Talbot / AP

Rutland County Republican Sen. Peg Flory has announced she will not seek reelection in November.

screenshot of timesargus.com

The Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times-Argus newspapers have been sold for the second time in 18 months.

courtesy

The Vermont Public Radio Board of Directors announced Thursday that West Virginia public broadcaster Scott Finn will be the next leader of VPR.

As of Jan. 1, 2018, all Vermont employers are required by law to provide paid sick time to employees working 18 hours a week or more.
Kelly Sikkema / Unsplash

For more than a year, Vermont has required employers to provide paid sick time to employees working at least 18 hours per week. Even businesses that already offered paid sick leave often required policy changes to comply. We're looking at Vermont's paid sick time law one year in.

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