Steve Zind

Senior Reporter & Special Projects Producer

Steve has been with VPR since 1994, first serving as host of VPR’s public affairs program and then as a reporter, based in Central Vermont. Many VPR listeners recognize Steve for his special reports from Iran, providing a glimpse of this country that is usually hidden from the rest of the world. Prior to working with VPR, Steve served as program director for WNCS for 17 years, and also worked as news director for WCVR in Randolph. A graduate of Northern Arizona University, Steve also worked for stations in Phoenix and Tucson before moving to Vermont in 1972. Steve has been honored multiple times with national and regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for his VPR reporting, including a 2011 win for best documentary for his report, Afghanistan's Other War.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy: NOFA-VT

Live call-in discussion: Are Organic Standards working?

We talk with Maddie Kempner, membership and advocacy coordinator with NOFA-VT, to answer this question. We’ll also hear from Pete Johnson, owner of Pete’s Greens in Craftsbury.

Striking workers have reached an agreement with Fairbanks Scales in St. Johnsbury and will return to work.

A lineman from Burlington Electric Department repairs downed wires on a transmission line in Williston Tuesday.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Thousands of Vermont households and businesses are still without power days after Sunday night's fierce windstorm. Green Mountain Power and other electric co-ops say they're making progress restoring power, but caution frustrated customers that the wait for power to return could last into the weekend.

On this "Vermont Edition" we speak with Mark Bushnell, author of "Hidden History of Vermont."
Mark Bushnell, Courtesy

The new book Hidden History of Vermont collects 15 years of Mark Bushnell's writing about the state’s past.

There are up-close-and-personal stories about well-known figures like Ethan Allen, and obscure but fascinating people like Lucy Cook, who cured patients while in a trance.

President Calvin Coolidge donned cowboy regalia while at a July 4 celebration in Rapid City, S.D., in 1927.
Associated Press

Vermonters may be fairly familiar with the Coolidge Homestead in Plymouth Notch, but there are few reminders of Calvin Coolidge's presidency beyond his native state.

However, a visit Coolidge paid to South Dakota 90 years ago is credited with helping create an iconic national memorial and shaping the economy of the Black Hills.

Robin Turnau has worked at VPR for nearly 30 years, and has served as President and CEO since 2009
VPR

It's been 40 years since Vermont Public Radio first signed on the air, broadcasting from studios in Windsor and a transmitter on Mount Ascutney.  We're talking to President and CEO Robin Turnau about how the times and technology have changed what VPR does, and the challenges of keeping pace with the myriad new ways we get our news and entertainment.

This interview originally aired in September 2016: Ben Matchstick and Pete Talbot — the founders of the Cardboard Teck Instantute — stop by Vermont Edition with their cardboard pinball machine creation: the PinBox 3000. The duo talk to Vermont Edition about how the PinBox 3000 works.

UVM President Tom Sullivan at a 2013 news conference. Sullivan has led the university since 2012.
Toby Talbot / AP

Colleges and universities have been at the center of some controversial issues lately. We're talking with University of Vermont President  Tom Sullivan about these issues and how they play out at Vermont’s largest public university. 

Scientists say storms like this one in Waitsfield in 2010 are dumping more rain on the Northeast
Toby Talbot / AP

The draft National Climate Report both refines and underscores the impact of human activity on our climate. We're focusing in on the effects in Vermont and the Northeast.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

After more than eight years, Vermont Public Radio's President and CEO Robin Turnau will be stepping down.

Brittany Caine-Conley, Congregate Charlottesville's lead organizer, speaks to those gathered at a vigil on Sunday, Aug. 13 at the site where the day before a car crashed into people protesting a white nationalist rally in the city.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

White supremacy, violence and even death played out in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. On this Vermont Edition, we'll discuss how we talk about these recent events and also look at what we can do here to address the issues raised.

VPR/Melody Bodette

Middlebury's Porter Medical Center hit a low point in 2016. In the process of instituting cuts to deal with serious financial losses, staff morale suffered. 

In this file photo, Judith Jones accepts a lifetime achievement award at the James Beard Foundation Awards ceremony on May 8, 2006 in New York. Jones, who edited cookbooks and more throughout her career, died at her summer home in Walden on Aug. 2, 2017.
Richard Drew / Associated Press File

When editor and author Judith Jones died last week at her summer home in Walden, Vermont, she was remembered as someone who forever changed our attitudes toward cooking and food. Jones was working for Alfred A. Knopf publishing when she discovered Julia Child, whose groundbreaking book on French cooking had been rejected by other publishers.

In this 2013 photo, an employee of Brown & Brown Insurances uses a treadmill desk
Michael Conroy / AP

The sedentary hours we spend at work at a desk or in front of a computer take a toll on our health. With nearly two-thirds of Vermont adults overweight or obese, businesses are discovering the benefits of giving employees more opportunities to be active and eat better. 

VPR/Steve Zind

The Vermont State Police has joined other agencies nationwide in responding to numerous reports of exhaust leaks in Ford Explorers. The vehicles are widely used by law enforcement.

Courtesy: Vt. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

A flowering plant thought to be extinct in Vermont has been rediscovered.

Winged loosestrife is a native plant related to the non-native invasive purple loosestrife.

Courtesy: Milk Money

What’s often called ‘equity crowdfunding’ is giving businesses, especially start-ups, a way to raise money when they can’t access capital from traditional sources, like bank loans.

It's also giving Vermonters a chance to invest locally.

A Hardwick log yard in 2004.
AP Photo/Toby Talbot

We hear a lot about Vermont's agricultural economy, but what about our working forests? Trees  cover more than 75 percent of Vermont. In past years the state's forest products industry has supported loggers, truckers and mills but its in decline and jobs and markets have been disappearing.

Stokes with his record-breaking fish.
Courtesy: Vt. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

One of Vermont's most accomplished anglers is 11-year-old Chase Stokes of Ferrisburgh, who recently entered the record books for a carp he caught in Otter Creek.

The Vermont Pride Theater Festival will be running the next two weekends at Randolph's Chandler Center for the Arts. After seven years, the Pride Theater Festival is an established part of the cultural life of Randolph.
Steve Zind / VPR

A small central Vermont community might seem an unlikely venue for the Vermont Pride Theater Festival, but organizers say it's the perfect place to present a series of plays focused on LGBTQ themes.

Pages