Taylor Dobbs

Digital Reporter

Taylor is VPR's digital reporter. After growing up in Vermont, he graduated with at BA in Journalism from Northeastern University in 2013.

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The Vermont Department of Health reports that three Vermonters got sick with a salmonella infection after eating bean sprouts traced to Wonton Food, Inc. in Brooklyn, New York.

Working in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as other state health departments in the northeast, the Vermont Department of Health determined that the three cases were part of a larger group of 68 cases across 10 states caused by the bean sprouts.

A new report from the Vermont Citizens Advisory Board says systemic problems with the state’s child protection processes contributed to the deaths of two children this spring.

The 26-page report raises serious questions about communication, quality control, training and investigations at the Vermont Department for Children and Families, as well as within law enforcement and the state court system.

Detectives with the Chittenden Unit for Special Investigations charged Rosemary Gile Wednesday in the July death of her four-week-old son, Saunder Gilruth.

Emergency responders responded to Isham Street in Burlington on July 22 and rushed the infant to Fletcher Allen Health Care (now the University of Vermont Medical Center), where he died on July 30.

Gile is charged with involuntary manslaughter in the death. She is due to appear in court on Dec. 4.

Burlington College's Board of Trustees has approved a deal to sell 25 acres of its lakefront land to Burlington developer Eric Farrell in order to reduce the college's debt burden, school officials announced Thursday.

Under the deal, Farrell is set to pay about $4 million to the Catholic Diocese - money the college currently owes the diocese, which sold the land to the college in 2010. Farrell will also pay $3.5 million to the college so it can pay down other debt; namely People's United Bank, which holds about $6.1 million of the college's debt.

While most Vermonters can look forward to two more years free of yard signs and political ads, Burlingtonians are headed right back into election season as Mayor Miro Weinberger's first term comes to a close.

Less than two weeks after polls closed and most (but not all) of Vermont's political races were decided, Burlington's former public works chief told Seven Days he plans to take on Weinberger.

Vermonters in the millennial generation are often seen as a success story in a state that has struggled to attract and retain young people. But cultural and economic trends mean millennials in the state are still falling short on the housing market.

It'd be hard to name any one reason why young people aren't buying homes in Vermont. Some are leaving the state, some are still too young to be expected to buy a home; others still live with their parents.

Vermont State Police are investigating what they say appears to be a double murder in Townshend.

Update 4:52 p.m.: Police have identified the two men found dead of apparent gunshot wounds in Townshend Tuesday. Steve Lott, age 60, and his son Jamis Lott, 28, were found dead in Steve Lott's home.

Robin O'Neill, 62, was arrested for what police say is two counts of second-degree murder.

Landowners along the route of the Vermont Gas pipeline met with Gov. Peter Shumlin Thursday to voice their concerns about the way the company negotiates with landowners about the pipeline right-of-way.

Shumlin met with 10 of the landowners along the pipeline route who have repeatedly voiced opposition to the pipeline itself and criticized Vermont Gas for its negotiating tactics.

The landowners are calling for a hold on all negotiations over access to their property until “fair and transparent rules of the game are in place.”

State officials have been working for months with the RAND Corporation to study the pros and cons of legalizing marijuana in Vermont.

This week, Secretary of Administration Jeb Spaulding took comments from a number of Vermonters all over the state in a televised public hearing.

And the one take-away from the meeting was that whatever the state decides about legalization, somebody's going to be upset.

To hear Laura Subin tell it, the big winners in Colorado's movement toward legalization weren't the first ones you'd think of.

You know him now as a U.S. Senator with his eye on the White House. But in 1987, he was the socialist-leaning mayor of Burlington who wanted to put out a five-song cassette.

A very special thanks to our friends at Seven Days for unearthing this album and sharing it with the world.

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