Taylor Dobbs

Digital Reporter

Taylor is VPR's digital reporter. After growing up in Vermont, he graduated with at BA in Journalism from Northeastern University in 2013.

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A Burlington collector is offering a $30,000 reward for information that leads to the return of some very rare baseball memorabilia from the early 1900s, according to people familiar with the theft of the collection.

According to a release from the Burlington Police Department, a number of rare collectibles were reported stolen last week from a home on North Prospect Street in Burlington.


Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Amy Burell-Cormier says she was pulled over six times in three months, but not because of her driving.

“The third time, the officer asked ‘Do you know why I’m pulling you over?’” she remembers. “I said yes, he said ‘Why?’ I said ‘Because I’m black driving down the road in Vermont,’ and he was horrified.”

The officer’s reason, she says, is that she was speeding – 27 miles per hour in a 25 mile per hour zone.

The U.S. Department of Education said Marlboro College is under investigation for issues relating to sexual violence.

Records show the department's Office of Civil Rights has been investigating the private non-profit college since early October.

The investigation is related to Title IX, the federal law protecting students from discrimination based on sex.

In the past six months, federal officials have launched more than 30 Title IX investigations across the U.S.

Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger has weighed in in favor of partial development of the 25-acre plot of land Burlington College is selling in order to improve its troubled finances.

The Vermont Department of Health reports that three Vermonters got sick with a salmonella infection after eating bean sprouts traced to Wonton Food, Inc. in Brooklyn, New York.

Working in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as other state health departments in the northeast, the Vermont Department of Health determined that the three cases were part of a larger group of 63 cases across 10 states caused by the bean sprouts.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A new report from the Vermont Citizens Advisory Board says systemic problems with the state’s child protection processes contributed to the deaths of two children this spring.

The 26-page report raises serious questions about communication, quality control, training and investigations at the Vermont Department for Children and Families, as well as within law enforcement and the state court system.

Detectives with the Chittenden Unit for Special Investigations charged Rosemary Gile Wednesday in the July death of her four-week-old son, Saunder Gilruth.

Emergency responders responded to Isham Street in Burlington on July 22 and rushed the infant to Fletcher Allen Health Care (now the University of Vermont Medical Center), where he died on July 30.

Gile is charged with involuntary manslaughter in the death. She is due to appear in court on Dec. 4.

Burlington College's Board of Trustees has approved a deal to sell 25 acres of its lakefront land to Burlington developer Eric Farrell in order to reduce the college's debt burden, school officials announced Thursday.

Under the deal, Farrell is set to pay about $4 million to the Catholic Diocese - money the college currently owes the diocese, which sold the land to the college in 2010. Farrell will also pay $3.5 million to the college so it can pay down other debt; namely People's United Bank, which holds about $6.1 million of the college's debt.

While most Vermonters can look forward to two more years free of yard signs and political ads, Burlingtonians are headed right back into election season as Mayor Miro Weinberger's first term comes to a close.

Less than two weeks after polls closed and most (but not all) of Vermont's political races were decided, Burlington's former public works chief told Seven Days he plans to take on Weinberger.

iStock / Thinkstock

Vermonters in the millennial generation are often seen as a success story in a state that has struggled to attract and retain young people. But cultural and economic trends mean millennials in the state are still falling short on the housing market.

It'd be hard to name any one reason why young people aren't buying homes in Vermont. Some are leaving the state, some are still too young to be expected to buy a home; others still live with their parents.

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