Welcome To Canada: Seeking Asylum In The North

Feb 21, 2017

Some people in the U.S. who are worried about changes in policy are making their way to the Canadian border to seek asylum. And they've had to cross the border into Canada illegally.

This is similar to a wave of asylum seekers who made their way through Vermont in 2003 before the Safe Third Country Agreement, signed by the U.S. and Canada in 2002, went into effect. That pact was meant to prevent those seeking asylum to do so in both countries. A number also left for Canada earlier to avoid the Special Registration or NSEERS (National Security Entry/Exit Registration System), instituted in 2002 by then-Attorney General John Ashcroft.

Patrick Giantonio, former executive director of Vermont Refugee Assistance, explains how that exodus to Canada differs from today's, what determines if some is an asylum seeker and why they are seeking refuge in Canada. And Montreal immigration lawyer Eric Taillefer explains how these asylum seekers are being handled in Canada.

Reporting from VPR's Kathleen Masterson:

Also on the program, we get an update on the planned sale of Stowe Mountain Resort to Vail Resorts. Alex Kaufman, host of the Wintry Mix podcast, talks us through some potential effects.

Correction 10:37 a.m. 02/22/2017: Our conversation with Kaufman included discussing the possibility for Vail to trademark "Stowe." However according to Vail's Vice President of Corporate Communications, the terms "Stowe" and "Stowe Mountain Resort" are already trademarked in regard to "year-round recreational services."

Broadcast live on Tuesday, Feb. 21 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.