Vermont Edition

Weekdays at Noon & 7:00pm

Want to know what's happening on Vermont Edition?

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

About the show: Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel cover current events with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

A blue-spotted salamander poses for its close-up. We're checking in on the amphibians and reptiles of Vermont.
Kiley Briggs / courtesy of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas

Live call-in discussion: Here's a word you might not know: herp (verb). It means to search for reptiles and amphibians. If you're a herper (noun) - either a dabbler or a full-blown frog freak - you won't want to miss this Vermont Edition. We're talking with local guru Jim Andrews; he'll give us an update on the cold-blooded world and answer your questions. 

Program originally aired in September 2015: A few years ago, we dispatched a team of producers and reporters to the Champlain Valley Fair and recorded sounds and stories. It's a great listen that we're bringing back again now that we're deep into fair season.

Earlier this summer, the state's economist told the Vermont Legislature that the revenue forecast for the rest of the year had been downgraded to the tune of $28 million.

Some of that gap had already been anticipated and addressed by lawmakers, but Gov. Phil Scott had to come up with a plan for how to cut the remainder out of the current budget. Last Thursday, Scott presented his plan to the LegislatureVermont Edition spoke with VPR's Peter Hirschfeld about how it went.

UVM President Tom Sullivan at a 2013 news conference. Sullivan has led the university since 2012.
Toby Talbot / AP

Colleges and universities have been at the center of some controversial issues lately. We're talking with University of Vermont President  Tom Sullivan about these issues and how they play out at Vermont’s largest public university. 

On this "Vermont Edition," we're talking about a new push for highway safety by state and local law enforcement across the state.
Doug Kerr / flickr

Following a recent rash of traffic fatalities, state and local law enforcement officials are conducting high-visibility campaigns to encourage Vermonters to use their seatbelts and to slow down. On this Vermont Edition, we're looking at efforts to improve highway safety in Vermont.

This piece originally aired in September 2016: In Rutland, a long-running radio show hosted by the late Joseph Chrusciel helped keep Polish music and culture alive for decades. Chrusciel, better known as "Uncle Joe" to his listeners, was a Sunday morning fixture for those who grew up in the area after World War II.

VPR's Nina Keck explored the history of Chrusciel's "Polish Hour" radio show and what it meant for the Polish community in the Rutland area.

Interview originally aired in May 2016: Vermont may be a small state, but it has produced many cartoonists over the years. Vermont Edition spoke to Rachel LindsayStephen Bissette and Robert Waldo Brunelle, Jr., who discussed why they became cartoonists, the business in the digital age and what the cartooning community in Vermont is like.

St. Michael's College graduates Danny Divis, left, and Justin McKenzie, right, throw out first pitches at the Boston Red Sox's "Vermont Night" at Fenway Park on Aug. 5. The two hockey players were awarded the Hockey Humanitarian Award last spring.
Dan Brown / Kapitol Photography

Danny Divis and Justin McKenzie, recent St. Michael's College graduates who played on the hockey team, started the mental health awareness campaign Hope Happens Here while they were students. This past spring they were recognized with the Hockey Humanitarian Award, a national honor for collegiate athletes who give back to their community.

Scientists say storms like this one in Waitsfield in 2010 are dumping more rain on the Northeast
Toby Talbot / AP

The draft National Climate Report both refines and underscores the impact of human activity on our climate. We're focusing in on the effects in Vermont and the Northeast.

Betty Smith Mastaler, seen here in 1978, talked to "Vermont Edition" recently about her first years at VPR and the state of the station.
VPR file

Aug. 13, 2017 marked Vermont Edition's 10th anniversary, and the 40th anniversary of Vermont Public Radio. To mark the occasion, we talked to someone who has been with the station for more than 40 years and has done a little bit of everything: Betty Smith Mastaler.

Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Next week, people across the country will turn their eyes - hopefully safely protected - to the skies to watch a rare solar eclipse. We're looking up too. We'll talk about the eclipse, and about stargazing, astronomy, and all the latest from space - including the dramatic final mission of the Saturn probe Cassini. 

Brittany Caine-Conley, Congregate Charlottesville's lead organizer, speaks to those gathered at a vigil on Sunday, Aug. 13 at the site where the day before a car crashed into people protesting a white nationalist rally in the city.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

White supremacy, violence and even death played out in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. On this Vermont Edition, we'll discuss how we talk about these recent events and also look at what we can do here to address the issues raised.

Robin Turnau has worked at VPR for nearly 30 years, and has served as President and CEO since 2009
VPR

Update 10:12 a.m. 8/14/17: This show is being rescheduled. We will provide an update here when a new date is set.

It's been 40 years since Vermont Public Radio first signed on the air, broadcasting from studios in Windsor and a transmitter on Mount Ascutney.  We're talking to President and CEO Robin Turnau about how the times and technology have changed what VPR does, and the challenges of keeping pace with the myriad new ways we get our news and entertainment.

We're talking about the impact of income sensitivity on school budgets across the state.
Don Kurto / iStock

Vermont has a program – known as income sensitivity - that allows some homeowners to pay their school taxes based on their income and not the value of their property.

VPR's Gunshots project explores the role of guns in life - and death - in Vermont through commentary, data and in depth reporting. We'll discuss the data and hear from you.
Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

This week, VPR has been presenting a project called Gunshots — our team compiled and analyzed data from every recorded gun death in the state over six years. VPR's Taylor Dobbs joins us to discuss the project, and the data.

When you're the economist for the Vermont legislature, sometimes you have to deliver unwelcome news to lawmakers.

VPR/Melody Bodette

Middlebury's Porter Medical Center hit a low point in 2016. In the process of instituting cuts to deal with serious financial losses, staff morale suffered. 

Interview originally aired in March 2016The Chittenden Solid Waste District initiated a public art project — "The Art Of Recycling" — in collaboration with and funded by Dealer.com. Eight of the district's big receptacles were turned over to local artists to beautify. And they're pretty striking.

Vermont Edition's Jane Lindholm met with CSWD's marketing specialist Jonny Finity and local artist Mary Lacy to see a few of these containers and talk about the project.

Interview originally aired in April 2016Joseph Mazur is professor emeritus of mathematics at Marlboro College and author of Fluke: The Math & Myth of Coincidence. Mazur spoke to Vermont Edition about his book and the odds related to coincidences occurring, as well as the distinctions between coincidences, flukes and serendipity.

In this file photo, Judith Jones accepts a lifetime achievement award at the James Beard Foundation Awards ceremony on May 8, 2006 in New York. Jones, who edited cookbooks and more throughout her career, died at her summer home in Walden on Aug. 2, 2017.
Richard Drew / Associated Press File

When editor and author Judith Jones died last week at her summer home in Walden, Vermont, she was remembered as someone who forever changed our attitudes toward cooking and food. Jones was working for Alfred A. Knopf publishing when she discovered Julia Child, whose groundbreaking book on French cooking had been rejected by other publishers.

Pages