Vermont Edition

Weekdays at Noon & 7:00pm

Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel consider the context of current events through interviews with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

Poet Galway Kinnell died on Tuesday of leukemia at his home in Sheffield. He had been described as a writer with the ability to flesh out music, raise the spirits and break the heart. He said he discovered the music in language in the rhythm of his mother’s Irish accent. In his career, Kinnell won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.

We listen back to an interview with Galway Kinnell that was recorded in 2009.

Next Tuesday voters will go the polls to elect statewide and legislative candidates. Friday on Vermont Edition, we preview Election Day in a roundtable discussion with some of the state's best political reporters.

We look at the people and issues in Campaign 2014, with a special focus on the governor's race between Democratic incumbent Peter Shumlin and Republican challenger Scott Milne, and the lieutenant governor's race between incumbent Republican Phil Scott and Progressive challenger Dean Corren.

Traverse the state on our highways and back roads and you’ll be treated to a display of historic barns. It’s believed there are as many as 10,000 historic barns and farm buildings in the state, dating as far back as the late 1700s. Some are still in daily use. But time and Vermont’s severe weather have taken a toll on these buildings.

School consolidation is something a lot of towns are considering, even without a legislative mandate.  We’ll get a close up look at one community’s conversations about the possibility of school consolidation with members of the consolidation study committee at Windsor Central Supervisory Union.

We’ll talk to Alice Worth, Windsor Central Supervisory Union Superintendent, and Greg Greene, member of the Joint Elementary Study Committee and chair of the Pomfret Elementary School Board.

Broadcast live on Wednesday, October 29 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

Sure, we’ve all heard of apple pie and pumpkin pie… but what about Marlborough pie, and Osgood pie? Have you ever tried grape pie, or Chess pie? These were all common sweet pie recipes back when our great grandmas were baking pies. At that time, it was not uncommon for women to bake a pie or two a day.

We learn all about the history of sweet pies, and get a few recipes with Anne-Haynie Collins. Her new book Vintage Pies: Classic American Pies for Today’s Home Baker.

Forests cover about three-fourths of Vermont’s land making it one of the most heavily forested states in the country. And well over half of those forests are family owned.

Vermont Family Forests Director David Brynn and Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation Commissioner Michael Snyder discuss the challenges these family forests face, the role they play in our ecosystem, the state's Current Use program and the best practices that can be employed to keep them sustainable.

Candidates have a week and a half of campaigning left before Election Day, and Dean Corren is among those working hard for votes. He's the Progressive and Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor, and he's our guest Friday on Vermont Edition. We'll look at why he's made single-payer health care his top priority and the challenges in implementing that system.

Also in the program, political analyst Eric Davis looks at the impact of what will likely be a low voter turnout election.

And we listen back to some of the voices in the week's news.

Efficiency Vermont might seem like a non-profit that helps you get cheaper, more environmentally friendly light bulbs, but actually, it is a utility. Efficiency Vermont was created by the Public Service Board in 2000 to help Vermonters use less electricity. That savings is the energy Efficiency Vermont, as a utility, produces. It’s about 13% of our total electric consumption.

Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott is running for his third term as Vermont’s second in command and as the highest-ranking Republican in the state.

He shares his thoughts on single-payer health care, school funding, renewable energy, job creation and stimulating the Vermont economy. And we’ll get his reaction to the IBM sale of the Essex plant.

Also on the program, we talk with Christine Ryan, executive director and lobbyist for the Vermont State Nurses' Association, about the shortage of psychiatric nurses in the state.

"It's been a long summer," says Frank Cioffi of the Greater Burlington Industrial Corporation, referring the long-awaited announcement that IBM is offloading its microchip manufacturing division, which includes the IBM plant in Essex Junction, to GlobalFoundries. We look at why IBM is paying Global Foundries $1.5 billion over three years to take over that business, what it means for employees,  and the impact on the state's economy.

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