Vermont Edition

Weekdays at Noon & 7:00pm

Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel consider the context of current events through interviews with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

Michael Dwyer / AP

Governor Peter Shumlin has three months left in his final term in charge. But he still has some thoughts on the direction the state should take on key issues.

Damian Dovarganes / AP

Across the country and here in Vermont, police body cameras and the footage that they capture are spurring big debates: over transparency, privacy, the use of force and when and how footage should be released.

Toby Talbot / AP

The prices that dairy farmers get for milk are down this summer. Economists will tell you it's supply and demand, and there's a lot of milk being produced in the U.S. and around the world. But the picture is complicated for Vermont farms that are trying to respond to the market.

Andy Duback / Courtesy of UVM College of Medicine

Ever wonder what's going on in your teenager's mind? You may be about to find out a lot more. The University of Vermont is taking a leading role in a massive national study into the developing brains of 10,000 adolescents.

Angela Evancie / VPR

For the first time since 2010, Vermont has an open seat for lieutenant governor. We’ll talk to the Republican candidate, Randy Brock. We'll discuss health care reform, tax policy and more.

Buckley Pics / iStock.com

A new report on hunger shows that Vermont's overall rate of food insecurity in improving, but advocates are concerned that that good news doesn't extend to seniors.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Vermont is an eclectic place, and we're serving up an eclectic mix of topics in today's program - from technology that's changing the way we think about cardboard, to the fantasy sci-fi world of steampunk, to the serious work of protecting civil liberties.

Meg Malone; Patti Daniels / VPR

What do you think is the most memorable public art in Vermont? But before answering that, let's back up even a bit further – how does one define public art?

AP Photo

On September 21, 1938, a hurricane slammed into New England killing hundreds and devastating the region. The storm pre-dated accurate weather forecasting, and left long-lasting effects on the region's economy, landscape and psyche.

James Margolis / iStock

What services should the state be funding and what elements of our infrastructure can we not afford to ignore? They're big questions with a lot of different answers.

Lauren Victoria Burke / AP

Vermont's sole congressman is a Democrat, but he's also received enough primary write-in votes to be the Republican candidate for Congress, too. We invite listeners to join the live conversation with Rep. Peter Welch on a wide range of issues.

Courtesy of Kate Daloz

The 1970s were a time of huge change in Vermont, as the back-to-the land movement swept the country and communes dotted the state. We’re hearing stories from that era of transformation and looking at how 1970s counterculture shaped the state we know today.

Courtesy of Kingdom County Productions

"When you see see your child so ... like a skeleton, it's terrifying," a mother says into the camera. "When we were in New York, people would walk up to her and say, 'Oh! You must be a model!' which made it even more horrific."  Maddy's is one of several stories told in the documentary All of Me, by Vermont filmmaker Bess O'Brien.

Chris Goldberg / Flickr

Vermont is a pretty dog-friendly state. That’s great for pet-lovers, but can come with some issues as well. We’re looking at the ins, outs and etiquette of dogs in public places.

peopleimages / iStock.com

About a year ago, Vermont's mental health community and gun-owners began work on a project to prevent the use of guns in suicide. The Gun Shop Project is one of the ways that Vermont is trying to lower its suicide rate.

Veleri / iStock

New planets, signals from deep space, Mars exploration, exploding satellites, astronauts setting records for time in space. It's been a wild few weeks for news about our galaxy and space exploration.

iStock

Are Vermont's independent doctors an endangered species? As the state's health care system continues to evolve, many independent physicians worry they'll be gobbled up by a few large organizations or simply left in the lurch.  We're talking about the current landscape for Vermont's independent doctors and looking at what the future may hold.

DNY59 / iStock

Returning from the holiday weekend, we'll be again sharing two memorable Vermont Edition pieces from this spring – one dealing with coincidences and the other about recycling containers.

Robert Waldo Brunelle Jr.

In the spring, a panel of Vermont cartoonists joined Vermont Edition. We're sharing that conversation again, as well as two pieces that weave together music and history: one about the "Polish Hour" radio show in Rutland that ran for 45 years, and another about the musical styles of ragtime, blues and jazz.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

He took over the post of Vermont State Police director as the state was in the throes of an opiate abuse epidemic. He's had to answer questions about a new study showing racial disparities in VSP traffic stops.

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