Vermont Edition

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Tuesday, May 30, 2017:

  • Join the discussion: Spring gardening show with Charlie Nardozzi

Monday, May 29, 2017:

  • No Vermont Edition today.

Friday, May 26, 2017:

About the show: Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel cover current events with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

The golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse with a blue sky background.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

The two big issues for the upcoming veto session in June will be the future of a bill legalizing the recreational use of marijuana and the fight over Gov. Phil Scott's plan to implement a statewide teachers' health care contract.

Oliver Parini / VPR

The governor had his say on the Legislature's marijuana bill when he vetoed it Wednesday. Now we'll get the thoughts of Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman.

Multiple marijuana plants.
labuda / iStock

On Wednesday, Gov. Phil Scott announced his decision on the fate of a marijuana legalization bill that had made its way to his desk. That decision was to veto the bill – but the governor also said there's potential to revisit marijuana legalization if certain changes are made by the Legislature, which is planning to hold a veto session in June.

Screenshot by Sam Gale Rosen / Interactive map from VCGI

Maps have come a long way. We've gone from "here be dragons" on parchment scrolls to an age of satellites, plane-mounted lasers, and democratization - everyone can now be his or her own cartographer. We're diving deep into the latest on what maps are, what they might become, and what we can learn from them.

PeopleImages / iStock

Tossing and turning all night, or drowsiness caused by staying up to play World of Warcraft too long into the night, might seem like mild irritants. But the consequences of lack of sleep can be much more dire.

Courtesy UVM Extension

Invasive plant and animal species exist all around us, but some are more damaging than others. A revamped tool from UVM Extension leverages citizen science to better track where invasive species are now, and which ones are approaching our region.

Annie Russell / VPR

A bill likely to become law would allow additional TIF districts in the state of Vermont. TIF stands for "tax increment financing" and proponents point to the districts as a way to revitalize downtowns around the state. Critics say they divert money that would otherwise go to the Education Fund.

eatcute / iStock

The state's nearly $6 billion budget faces a veto and a lot of uncertainty after that – all because a $26 million question over teachers' health insurance wasn't solved. On Vermont Edition, we talk with the teachers union and the Vermont School Boards Association about what this debate means to the health plans of teachers and to the bottom lines of school districts.

Vermont Fish & Wildlife, Courtesy

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is warning people to mitigate the possibility of having a bad encounter with a bear. The department is already gearing up for what they expect to be record human-bear interactions this year.

Pete Hirschfeld / VPR

Late Thursday night, the Legislature adjourned for the year after passing a state budget that Gov. Phil Scott has said he will veto. Our panel of top political reporters looks at the two weeks of deadlock over the budget, and what happens next.

Amy Forliti / Associated Press

This weekend a seminar is being held in Stowe that critics say will spread misinformation about the risks of vaccines. It's topic in which science and emotion collide for parents and communities.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

A news conference was held Wednesday at noon in Montpelier by House Speaker Mitzi Johnson and Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe to discuss the status of negotiations around Vermont teachers' health care and subsequently the Vermont state budget.

A gigantic pillar of smoke with the familiar mushroom top climbs above Yucca Flat during nuclear detonation in Las Vegas, Nev., April 22, 1952.
Larry Ullom / Associated Press

"The alternatives are to dig, die or get out — and we certainly don't want to die." That assessment in 1954 by a Midwestern governor encapsulates the massive but deeply problematic redundancy planning civilian and military leaders undertook to prepare for a Soviet nuclear attack. This shadowy legacy of the Cold War is explored in the new book Raven Rock by Vermont-based journalist Garrett Graff. 

Patti Daniels / VPR

South Burlington voters have rejected two school budgets amidst the ongoing debate over the changing of the high school's "rebel" nickname. They'll vote on a third in June.

Angela Evancie / VPR FILE

A late proposal by Governor Phil Scott on teachers' health care plans sent the Legislative session into overtime. We hear from Governor Scott about the plan and the timing of introducing the idea so late in the session.

Spider web on a piece of barbed wire.
Natcha29 / iStockphoto.com

Scientists are trying to unlock some of the secrets of spider silk by sequencing the genetic code of the spiders themselves. One new study is led by the University of Vermont and the University of Pennsylvania.

Evan Vucci / Associated Press

President Trump's abrupt firing of FBI Director James Comey has sent shockwaves through Washington and beyond, as concerns mount that the President may be trying to interfere with the investigation into his campaign's possible ties to Russian election meddling.

Nokian Tyres sign outside its Colchester headquarters with arrows pointing to corporate offices, customer service, and shipping and receiving.
Meg Malone / VPR

Nokian Tyres recently announced plans to build a plant in Tennessee, but Tommi Heinonen – head of Nokian Tyres North America – says there are no plans at the moment to move the company's North American headquarters out of Vermont.

Angela Evancie / VPR FILE

Rather than rush to judgment on some key pieces of legislation, Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe decided last week to reconvene Wednesday and Thursday. Now as state lawmakers head back to Montpelier, Sen. Ashe is our guest.

Weybridge Elementary School fourth-grader Juliette Hunsdorfer shows off a copy of 'The War That Saved My Life,' while sixth-grader Narges Anzali listens to another reader's comments about the book.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The War That Saved My Life, by author Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, is a World War II-era story about a girl and her brother who have a chance to escape their cruel childhood when London is evacuated during the war.

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