Vermont Edition

Weekdays at Noon & 7:00pm

Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel consider the context of current events through interviews with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

David Garten

It's been a year of big changes in U.S.-Cuba relations. In December, after intense negotiations, President Obama and President Raul Castro of Cuba announced that the two countries would normalize relations. Just this Wednesday, the announcement came that Cuba and the U.S. are reopening their embassies.

We're talking to Vermonters with ties to Cuba about their experiences, what's changing, and what might come next in the U.S.-Cuba relationship.

Curtis Creative / iStock

The Vermont State Board of Education adopted new standards for physical education and health classes this past May. Physical educators will now have access to national resources from SHAPE America and the National Health Education Standards, mirroring the introduction of Common Core in other subjects. The goal? Promoting lifelong healthy habits in students.

AP

In 1852, former slave and abolitionist Frederick Douglass was invited to speak at an event commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence. He delivered a speech that has become known as “The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro.” In it he rebuked the country for slavery, which he called "the great sin and shame of America."

twildlife / iStock

The Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife spent three years taking input on proposed changes to deer hunting rules, and the process has finally yielded changes that will go into effect in 2016. A ban on natural urine lures and expanded opportunities for hunting with crossbows are among the new regulations hunters will get used to.

Tony Talbot / AP

For many, sorting trash from recyclables and compost comes down to personal preference. With the unanimous 2012 passing of Act 148, or the Universal Recycling Law, this practice is becoming mandatory. The second phase of the eight-year plan to reduce materials sent to landfills goes into effect July 1, and instates compulsory recycling statewide.

Wilson Ring / AP

During this year's legislative session, a  comprehensive transportation bill totaling $616 million was passed. It will improve structurally deficient bridges, make municipal storm water improvements, and provide funding for rail, public transit systems, airports and bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

We discuss the bill's impact with Transportation Secretary Sue Minter.

AP

If you've read only one thing by author Shirley Jackson, it's almost definitely her short story "The Lottery," a taut narrative about a yearly small-town ritual - with nasty twist. But Jackson had a productive, masterful career beyond "The Lottery." Some might say, two careers.

Jochen Kunz / iStock

Small businesses are believed to be the driver of an economic recovery. But how does someone go about raising the capital needed to buy an existing small business or to start a new one? And what about growing a small business when it's time to expand?

Steve Zind / VPR

There are about 12,000 students enrolled in the five Vermont State Colleges, but the cost of attending and the ability of students to complete their degrees is an increasing concern for state college leaders. On the next Vermont Edition, we talk with Chancellor Jeb Spaulding and with Yasmine Zeisler, chief academic officer of VSC, about how to make the state college system work for Vermonters.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Natalie Kinsey-Warnock is a children's book author with deep roots in the Northeast Kingdom, who bases many of her books on her family history. Now, she's helping kids dig into their own family trees and tell their own stories with her Storykeepers project. They've uncovered secrets, surprises, and some unforgettable characters.

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