Vermont Edition

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

About the show: Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel cover current events with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

Robin Turnau has worked at VPR for nearly 30 years, and has served as President and CEO since 2009
VPR

It's been 40 years since Vermont Public Radio first signed on the air, broadcasting from studios in Windsor and a transmitter on Mount Ascutney.  We're talking to President and CEO Robin Turnau about how the times and technology have changed what VPR does, and the challenges of keeping pace with the myriad new ways we get our news and entertainment.

Lt. Governor Zuckerman with two Syrian families resettled in Vermont.
courtesy

With his first legislative session as lieutenant governor under his belt, Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman joins us to discuss the major issues facing the state and his focus going forward.

There's still plenty of gardening left to do as summer slips away and autumn arrives. Gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi stops by this "Vermont Edition" to share fall gardening advice.
Brzozowska / iStockphoto.com

As the temperatures are cooling and autumn is waiting to be ushered in, there's still a lot to be done in your garden and to your lawn.

That's why gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi is paying Vermont Edition a visit.

A moose enjoys a rainy day in Woodbury, Vermont. We're talking about the state of the state's wildlife.
Charles Wohlers / flickr

From fish to snakes to bears, wildlife in Vermont face some big challenges. The bear population is growing, and that's raising concern in some residential areas. The number of deer is on the rise, but the state's moose herd is struggling. And some species are being affected by climate change.

We're talking with Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Louis Porter about these issues and others.

Sheriff Keith Clark underwent therapy at the Brattleboro Retreat for depression and suicidal thoughts. He's going public with the hope that it will help others.
Toby Talbot / AP File

One of Vermont's most well-known law enforcement officers is speaking out about his battle with depression and suicidal thoughts, in the hopes that it might help others seek help.

Maj. Gen. Steven Cray, pictured on far right at a 2013 press conference announcing the F-35 basing in Burlington, is adjutant general of the state of Vermont. Cray spoke to "Vermont Edition" about recently announced policies affecting the U.S. military.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

During the United States' longrunning conflict in Afghanistan, Vermont Guard soldiers and airmen have been deployed to the country multiple times. When President Donald Trump announced a troop increase in Afghanistan earlier this month, it came as no surprise to Maj. Gen. Steven Cray, adjutant general of the state of Vermont.

Cray spoke to Vermont Edition about how the troop increase might affect those who serve in the Vermont Guard and also discussed the president's stated objective to ban transgender people from serving in the U.S. armed forces.

President Theodore Roosevelt addresses a crowd in Bellows Falls on September 1, 1902.
Courtesy, SMU Central University Library

Ted Kohn, the new dean of the college of liberal arts at Norwich University, is a Theodore Roosevelt expert.

He has written or edited three books on Roosevelt.

With the 26th president's many ties to Vermont, it's only appropriate that Kohn has landed in the state.

A fight in Burlington's City Hall Park led to a man being stabbed in the neck in August. We're talking about whether criminal penalties for repeated civil violations could stem this type of violence.
Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Incidents of violence in downtown Burlington - including two recent stabbings - have led the police chief and others to call for criminal penalties for racking up too many civil violations, like public drunkenness. On Monday, the city council passed a resolution taking a step in that direction.

Critics say it's a step along the path to criminalizing poverty and homelessness. We're hearing the debate.

This interview originally aired in September 2016: Ben Matchstick and Pete Talbot — the founders of the Cardboard Teck Instantute — stop by Vermont Edition with their cardboard pinball machine creation: the PinBox 3000. The duo talk to Vermont Edition about how the PinBox 3000 works.

This interview originally aired in April 2016: The high school members of the slam poetry group "Muslim Girls Making Change" — Balkisa Abdikadir, Hawa Adam, Lena Ginawi and Kiran Waqar — talk to Vermont Edition about the formation of the group, their inspirations, their writing process and their personal experiences in Vermont. Also, the group performs one of their original pieces "Wake Up America."

A replica of the Enterprise bridge set from the original "Star Trek" television series is seen here in Ticonderoga, N.Y. on Aug. 13, 2016 at "Trekonderoga." The set will now have a permanent home in the town.
Hans Pennink / Associated Press

Visitors to this past weekend's "Trekonderoga" Star Trek convention in Ticonderoga, New York, got to tour a near-perfect replica of the original series set, housed in a building downtown. Now thanks to a gift from the wife of an heir to the Mars Candy fortune, that building will become the set's permanent home.

Former Vermonter and award-winning chef Seamus Mullen talks to us about his latest book, "Real Food Heals: Eat to Feel Younger and Stronger Every Day."
Penguin Random House, courtesy

Award-winning chef Seamus Mullen grew up in Vermont and is now the owner of several New York City restaurants. And he says you can eat nutritiously while enjoying outstanding dishes.

We're talking to Chief Justice Paul Reiber of the Vermont Supreme Court about the process of justice in our state.
Royalbroil / Wikimedia Commons

What are some of the major challenges facing Vermont’s court system? Does the system have the financial resources it needs to ensure that all Vermonters have access to justice?

We’re talking to Vermont Supreme Court Chief Justice Paul Reiber about some of the key issues surrounding Vermont’s courts.

Shani Stoddard, recent winner of Outright Vermont's "Drag Idol" competition, says he loves performing drag.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

For the last 14 years, the LGBTQ advocacy organization Outright Vermont has hosted "Drag Idol," where novice drag queens and drag kings are invited to perform in a drag competition. The 2017 Drag Idol winner was Shani Stoddard, who took home the $100 prize and bragging rights.

Antifa is the name given to anti-fascist groups.
Labsas / iStock

When white supremacists rallied in Charlottesville, Virginia, they were met with resistance from counter-protesters, including members of the antifa, the anti-fascist movement.

Antifa supporters say they are sending a strong message to neo-Nazis and white supremacists and they're not afraid to use violence or intimidation to get their point across. But some people worry that Antifa actually inflames the violence and is a threat to free speech.

A blue-spotted salamander poses for its close-up. We're checking in on the amphibians and reptiles of Vermont.
Kiley Briggs / courtesy of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas

Here's a word you might not know: herp (verb). It means to search for reptiles and amphibians. If you're a herper (noun) - either a dabbler or a full-blown frog freak - you won't want to miss this Vermont Edition. We're talking with local guru Jim Andrews; he'll give us an update on the cold-blooded world and answer your questions. 

Program originally aired in September 2015: A few years ago, we dispatched a team of producers and reporters to the Champlain Valley Fair and recorded sounds and stories. It's a great listen that we're bringing back again now that we're deep into fair season.

Earlier this summer, the state's economist told the Vermont Legislature that the revenue forecast for the rest of the year had been downgraded to the tune of $28 million.

Some of that gap had already been anticipated and addressed by lawmakers, but Gov. Phil Scott had to come up with a plan for how to cut the remainder out of the current budget. Last Thursday, Scott presented his plan to the LegislatureVermont Edition spoke with VPR's Peter Hirschfeld about how it went.

UVM President Tom Sullivan at a 2013 news conference. Sullivan has led the university since 2012.
Toby Talbot / AP

Colleges and universities have been at the center of some controversial issues lately. We're talking with University of Vermont President  Tom Sullivan about these issues and how they play out at Vermont’s largest public university. 

On this "Vermont Edition," we're talking about a new push for highway safety by state and local law enforcement across the state.
Doug Kerr / flickr

Following a recent rash of traffic fatalities, state and local law enforcement officials are conducting high-visibility campaigns to encourage Vermonters to use their seatbelts and to slow down. On this Vermont Edition, we're looking at efforts to improve highway safety in Vermont.

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