Vermont Edition

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Monday, July 24, 2017:

About the show: Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel cover current events with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

Boston Red Sox third baseman Tzu-Wei Lin swings at a pitch during the 8th inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, in Arlington, Texas. We're talking about what's coming in the second half of the season.
Michael Ainsworth / Associated Press

The Red Sox started the baseball season sluggish, but now they're fired up. The Yankees meanwhile, got off to a great start but now they're floundering. On this episode of Vermont Edition, it's our annual summer baseball show!

Discussions around sexual consent should be ongoing between people in a relationship.
Neustockimages / iStock

As humans, we can send a lot of mixed signals. This is particularly true in relationships and thus, regarding sexual consent. We're highlighting the conversation and some of the questions caught up in it.

We're talking about challenges and opportunities for Vermont farmers with Agriculture Secretary Anson Tebbetts.
U.S. Department of Agriculture / flickr

The economy and the environment are changing quickly. How can Vermont's agricultural sector best adapt to keep up? As VPR explores the shifting landscape for Vermont farms, we're talking to Agriculture Secretary Anson Tebbetts about the challenges and opportunities faced by our state's farmers.

Hartland's Civil War soldiers are commemorated with this statue in the center of town.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Vermont Civil War historian Howard Coffin discusses some of his new research about the role that Vermonters played at the Battle of Gettysburg, a pivotal Union victory.

Travel writer Jen Rose Smith shares tips on New England road trips. She lists Portland, Maine – which is where the pictured Harbor Fish Market is located – as an outstanding food destination.
EJJohnsonPhotography / iStock

Four-day weekends don't come along often, so now that you've got one, how will you use it?

Travel writer Jen Rose Smith is the author of New England Road Trip, and she shares some ideas on Vermont Edition.

Brent McCoy / Modern Times Theater

Most Vermont cities and towns don't have a big theater district, But the good news is, that makes the whole state something of a theater district! There are performances going on from Southern Vermont to the Northeast Kingdom - and that includes some traveling performers who bring their show to you.

This label is showing up more frequently alongside bins for recycling and trash.
Toby Talbot / AP

Vermont is now three years into its plan to get the whole state on board with universal recycling and composting.  But when you look at the number inside the triangle with arrows, do you know immediately what kind of plastic it is and how to recycle it? And are you occasionally still scrapping food scraps into the garbage?

mark wragg / Thinkstock

As the country and the state struggle with the opiate crisis, Vermont is taking action by zeroing in on one way that people can initially get hooked: narcotics that are legitimately prescribed by physicians for pain.

Lisa Rathke / Associated Press

Gov. Phil Scott and lawmakers finally compromised on the state budget last week, but the outcome creates a whole new set of financial dilemmas for school districts across Vermont. And the governor's veto of pot legalization disappointed supporters who thought it had a chance. We examine both controversies in a live interview with the governor.

Eleven year old Katherine Stevens, right, and nine year old Austin Anderson, listen to arguments in Vermont Superior Court, in Hyde Park, Oct. 22, 1997. The two children were part of a lawsuit challenging Act 60, by schoolchildren in Stowe.
Toby Talbot / AP

Twenty years ago, Act 60 reshaped Vermont's education system. Designed to tackle inequality in education spending among towns, the legislation divided communities and made national headlines. Vermont Edition looks back at that debate, and at Act 60's legacy in today's battles over education and equity.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

Lawmakers could have overridden two vetoes when they returned to Montpelier on Wednesday. The governor's veto of a pot legalization bill stands, but legislators did strike a deal to approve the state budget. However, their compromise with Gov. Phil Scott puts school boards on the hook to find cost savings.

Vermont Law School, Courtesy

Brittmy Martinez, a rising second-year student at Vermont Law School, is one of three VLS students recently named to the National Black Law Students Association's executive board. She is the chief of staff of NBLSA. 

Title IX has been a federal law since 1972. We look at what progress women have made on campus and in business because of the law.
Stockce / iStock

On June 23, 1972, Title IX went into effect, mandating the equal treatment of all students, regardless of gender, in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. So how much have education and professional opportunities for women improved in that time?

South Burlington High School and Milton Middle School have both had rocky conversations about race and inclusion during this school year.
BeholdingEye / iStock

A few recent highly publicized racial incidents at schools have left some Vermonters unsettled, but minority communities say racial bias in schools is an everyday experience, not an outlier. Vermont Edition looks at what Vermont schools should do to address racism.

Frustrated with the stance taken by the Vermont School Board Association on issues like Act 46 and statewide teacher health care negotiations,some school board members have taken the step of forming a new group. It's called the Alliance of Vermont School Board Members.

The golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse with a blue sky background.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

This week, lawmakers in Montpelier will hold a special veto session to address the big issues where agreement couldn't be reached before adjournment. Vermont Edition talks to top political reporters about days of behind-the-scenes negotiations between lawmakers and the Scott administration – and what any possible deals on the budget and marijuana legalization could look like.

Seen here is "Sympetrum obtrusum" or a white-faced meadowhawk, snapped by today's show guest Bryan Pfeiffer. Click through this slideshow to see more of Pfeiffer's photography.
Bryan Pfeiffer, courtesy

Even if you're not a fan of insects, you have to be intrigued by their variety, colors, and characteristics. The annual bug show is your opportunity to learn about and get more comfortable with the insects that surround you.

The golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse with a blue sky background.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Disagreement over health care contracts for employees at public schools prompted next week's veto session, but it's not clear if the Republican governor and Democratic lawmakers will be able to bridge the divide between them on this issue.

Courtesy Bloomsbury Academic

Former House Speaker John McCormack might be the most important political leader most people don't remember - or may not have even heard of. His time as a Massachusetts congressman spanned the presidencies of Calvin Coolidge to Richard Nixon, and he served as Speaker of the House during the turbulent years from 1962-1971.

We're talking about summer reading on "Vermont Edition," and we want to hear your recommendations.
sensay / iStock

Vermont Edition's annual summer reading show is here! We're offering up a smorgasbord of book recommendations from readers, which means we want to hear from you.

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