Vermont Edition

Weekdays at Noon & 7:00pm

Thursday, July 19, 2018

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Close up of a teal dragonfly's eyes
Macroworld / iStock

They're out there, again. Bees, borers and butterflies. Dragonflies, damselflies and dobsonflies. And now Vermont Edition is ready to get up close and personal with all of them.

David Rosane and The Zookeepers on their tour of Vermont libraries.
David Rosane, courtesy

Although libraries are often associated with tight-lipped librarians demanding quiet, a Vermont band with ties to France intends to pump up the volume with a summer library tour supporting local branches.

Tax Commissioner Kaj Samsom, center, said in an email to employees Monday that their "anxiety" and "stress" over the prospect of a government shutdown is unncessary.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

The disagreement between Gov. Phil Scott and legislative leaders over using one-time surplus money to stabilize property tax rates is now in its fourth week. And Gov. Scott has vetoed the latest budget from lawmakers. We're hearing from administration officials on their take on the standoff.

At his campaign launch in Barre in May, Democrat James Ehlers touted his policy agenda as the most progressive of the candidates seeking the governor's seat in 2018.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

James Ehlers is one of four Democrats running for governor. We're talking with the candidate about his platform and his priorities as we head toward the state's Aug. 14 primary. 

Hannah Weiss installing automated temperature sensors on a snow pile at Craftsbury Outdoor Center.
Paul Bierman / The University of Vermont

In the heat of summer, snow is the last thing you’d expect to find in the Vermont woods. But at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center this summer, that’s exactly what you’ll find — after a bit of digging — that is.

Suicide rates have increased both nationally and in Vermont over the past decades.
CDC

New data show a sharp rise in the nationwide suicide rate, and Vermont's rate is significantly above the national average.

There's also a growing national awareness of the scope of suicide as a serious widespread public health problem.

The new vaccine for shingles is significantly more effective and long-lasting.
Esben-H / iStock

There's a new vaccine available for shingles, a disease caused by the same virus that causes chicken pox. It's significantly more effective, and for a longer length of time, than the old vaccine. And if you're an adult between the ages of 50 and 64, the state will pay for you to get it.

Vermont has no shortage of talented athletes engaging in compelling competitions this summer. But do you know where to see these athletes run, row and ride? We’re looking at Vermont's summer sports and the games, matches and other opportunities to see athletes perform this season. 

H. Brooke Paige
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

If you look at the list of statewide candidates in this year's election, there's something that will definitely catch your eye: H. Brooke Paige of Washington, Vermont is listed as a Republican candidate for six different state and federal offices.

We're talking about the history of butter and checking in with some local Vermont buttermakers.
Pauline Mak / Flickr

It may seem like a simple food staple - something to make bread a little more interesting - but butter has a long and surprising history. Think Irish bogs, Tibetan butter sculptors and the decades-long PR battle between butter and margarine.

We're talking to the author of a new history of butter, and checking in with some Vermont buttermakers perfecting the craft.

Castleton University has faced layoffs, one of the moves made by the Vermont State Colleges System to combat falling enrollments.
Lisa Rathke / Associated Press

Colleges throughout Vermont and New England are facing falling enrollments and rising costs. We're talking about how Vermont state colleges are dealing with this challenging combination.

Looking up at the golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse on a cloudy day.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

In the midst of a political stalemate in Montpelier over the budget for the next year, what could end the disagreement between legislative leaders and Gov. Phil Scott? And how are Vermonters outside of the capitol understanding the dispute?

Retired Middlebury College political science professor Eric Davis joins Vermont Edition to discuss compromise, politics and the public perception of the political gridlock gripping the statehouse.

Sen. Tim Ashe speaking during a 2016 special session.
Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / VPR

Legislative leaders and Gov. Phil Scott can't seem to agree on property tax rates or a state budget for next year. But they do agree that a state government shutdown on July 1 would be a disaster for Vermont.

Vermont Edition talks with Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe about efforts to settle this disagreement and avoid a shutdown. 

A member of the College of St. Joseph esports team during practice.
College of St. Joseph, Courtesy

As video games like League of Legends and Fortnite have grown in popularity, so have competitions involving these games. Now the College of St. Joseph in Rutland has added esports to its athletic roster, alongside the likes of soccer, basketball and volleyball. Despite the school's struggles with enrollment and plans to avoid closure, the program has now added a new esports arena.

We're talking about the law that reimburses out-of-staters up to $10,000 to move to Vermont to work remotely, and how it fits into the state's strategy on jobs and attracting workers.
Infadel / iStock

By now you've probably heard about the law that reimburses out-of-staters up to $10,000 to move to Vermont to work remotely. We're talking about that plan and the big reaction it's getting, both positive and negative. Plus, how remote work fits into Vermont's economy and what else the state is doing to support it as an option.

"Breakout," the new novel by author Kate Messner, captures a community's response - and questions - following the escape of two inmates from a nearby maximum security prison.
From left: Bloomsbury Publishing, Kate Messner / Courtesy

Two men escaped from a maximum security prison in Dannemora, New York, three years ago. The Adirondack community was wracked by fear and uncertainy as the manhunt to find the two convicted murders lasted nearly a month.

But the incident also inspired author Kate Messner to write a young adult novel based on the frightening real-life event.

Sonny Brown, 86, of East Dover, Vermont.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Over the last couple of months, we have been in the search for the most interesting Vermonters. We've met a 106-year-old from Townshend and a man in Charlotte who grows and gives away 10,000 roses every year.

A bike rider on Stowe's 5.3-mile recreation path along the West Branch of Little River.
kevinmwalsh / iStock

Summer is prime biking time in Vermont, from riding the roads and rail trails to tackling tougher terrain like dirt paths and mountain biking. We're looking at the best Vermont has to offer for those on two wheels, plus biking basics and riding safely no matter where the trail takes you.

E-cigarettes like the Juul have caught on with teens in a big way, and schools have been struggling to keep up. We'll talk about vaping's new popularity, and the health issues involved.
Steven Senne / AP

The popularity of vaping among young people is sounding alarm bells for educators and health professionals, as trendy e-cigarettes like the Juul are becoming a more common sight in middle and high schools. We're talking about where the rise in this behavior is coming from, the health issues at stake and what schools and the state are doing in response.

Campaigns for statewide and legislative candidates are now officialy underway after the May 31 filing deadline.
Jason Doiy / iStock

The deadline to file for elected office in Vermont was Thursday, May 31, and now campaigns for statewide and legislative candidates are officially underway. Here are the candidates just one day after the state's filing deadline:

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