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Monday, April 23, 2018

Friday, April 20, 2018

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Alex Jospe was on the U.S. National ski orienteering team from 2007 to 2015, and she set the course for this week's ski orienteering world cup in Craftsbury.
Alex Jospe / courtesy

World class athletes from teams around the world are gathering in Craftsbury, Vermont for the final event in the Ski Orienteering World Cup this week. Never heard of SkiO? You're not alone.

The Jericho town meeting in 2017. We're talking about whether town meeting still make sense in the modern era.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Town Meeting Day is almost here, and every year the question gets raised: does town meeting still make sense in the modern era? We're looking at how this tradition has changed over time and how it fits with Vermont's democracy today.

Looking up at the Vermont Statehouse from the steps in front.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

The legislature is nearing its Town Meeting Day break. At this halfway mark, we're talking to top political reporters on the status of key bills, including gun control, education financing, paid family leave, raising the minimum wage and water quality efforts.

Vermont's attendant services program, or ASP, is up for elimination in Governor Scott's budget.
Katarzyna Bialasiewicz / iStock

Vermont's attendant services program — or ASP — directs $1.38 million in state funds to help Vermonters with permanent and severe disabilities. It’s been targeted for elimination by Gov. Scott’s latest budget.

We're talking with Vermont gun owners about how their use of firearms informs their views on gun laws and gun control.
artas / iStock

Conversations about firearms and gun control are often dominated by extreme views, leaving many in the middle whose voices aren't heard. That includes voices informed by their own gun ownership. We're talking with Vermont gun owners about recent shifts in the discussion around guns and our gun laws. 

The House chamber of the Vermont Legislature
Angela Evancie / VPR/file

There are three ways at the moment that Vermont House members can vote on a bill or an amendment to a bill. But there's also talk of introducing an electronic voting system that could shake things up in Montpelier.

Mo, a recurring character from Bechdel's comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For, is drawn in black and white with an exasperated facial expression on the wall of Bechdel's exhibtion at the Fleming Museum
Meg Malone / VPR

Vermont has laid claim to cartoonist Alison Bechdel, making her its third (and current) cartoonist laureate. And now fans of Bechdel and those who are Bechdel-curious can see an exhibition of her work at UVM's Fleming Museum through May 20.

Medication-assisted treatment is one of the most effective ways to combat opioid addiction, but access to MAT in Vermont prisons can be limited.
Instants / iStock

Dealing with addiction in prison is complicated. For some, it helps them get away from the drugs and into treatment. But treatment while incarcerated can be limited, and those leaving prison often face the greatest risk of a relapse.

Angela McDevitt is being credited with helping to thwart what could have been a deadly school shooting in Vermont.
Angela McDevitt

On the day a shooter in Florida killed 17 people at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, 18-year old Jack Sawyer of Poultney, Vermont was allegedly texting with his friend Angela McDevitt. "That's fantastic. 100% support it" he is reported to have written about the Parkland shooting. "It's just natural selection, taken up a notch."

Elizabeth Atherton and Sally O’Brien work on placing their photos, taken in front of a green screen, into pictures of places from medieval France.
Aym Kolb Noyes / VPR

Readers at the Neshobe School in Brandon are really getting into Adam Gidwitz’s book The Inquisitor’s Tale, which takes place in the Middle Ages — meaning that with the help of imagination and technology, they are literally putting themselves into the narrative.

Gun control advocates demonstrate at the State House in Montpelier, on Tuesday Feb. 20, 2018.
Wilson Ring / AP

The conversation around gun control in Vermont has changed significantly in the days following the arrest of an 18-year-old for allegedly plotting a mass shooting in Fair Haven. Republican Gov. Phil Scott, who had resisted any changes to the state's gun laws, now has presented a set of proposals to tighten them, and lawmakers are already taking action. We’re talking about what might happen.

Sec. of State Jim Condos discusses how states like Vermont could be vulnerable to election meddling, and what's needed to secure future elections.
Toby Talbot / AP File

Thirteen Russians face indictments for interfering in the 2016 presidential election. Last year, the Department of Homeland Security identified more than 20 states whose voting systems were compromised by Russian hackers. As they face concerns over election integrity both inside and outside the ballot box, how are Vermont officials keeping future elections secure?

UVM Plant Biologist Eric Bishop von Wettberg displays the domestic and the wild chickpea.
Joshua Brown / UVM

You probably don't often think of chickpeas — sometimes called garbanzo beans — even when you're digging into some humus. And you likely think of the wild chickpea even less. But it's the primary source of protein for about one in five people around the globe, which is why one UVM biologist is turning to wild strains of the legume to keep the chickpea population healthy.

With temperatures bobbing and weaving above and below freezing, Vermont's backyard sugaring is going strong.
Bakinbitz / iStock

Vermonters catch a fever at this time of year. And it isn't necessarily the flu bug. It's the hankering to get outside and start hauling buckets full of sap to the sugarhouse or to wherever they do their boiling. It's backyard sugaring time.

Senator Bernie Sanders joins us for an hour-long discussion and takes your calls.
Screenshot @BernieSanders Twitter

Senator Bernie Sanders joins Vermont Edition for a discussion about the Russia investigation, the immigration debate, the Trump budget, his recent comments on gun legislation and more.

Phil Scott puts his right hand up and is sworn in as Vermont's governor at the Montpelier Statehouse in January 2017.
Angela Evancie / VPR

Longtime VPR reporter Bob Kinzel is ready to answer your questions about the inner workings of the Legislature, state government and Vermont's political history.

Today's question was originally sent to our podcast, Brave Little State and inquires about the length of the state's gubernatorial term.

Looking up at the Vermont Statehouse from the steps in front.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

VPR reporter Bob Kinzel has been covering the Statehouse since 1981 — longer than any continuously serving member of the Legislature.

To take advantage of that institutional memory, we're kicking off a new periodic segment called "Ask Bob." First up: a look at the increasing number of lobbyists in the Vermont Statehouse.

The average smart phone is replaced roughly every 22 months, spurring calls across the country to protect customers' "right to repair" their electronics.
Bru-nO / Pexels

Have you ever tried fixing one of your electric gadgets? Even simply replacing the battery in your cell phone can require special skills or tools. You may not be allowed to do more advanced repairs without potentially voiding a warranty. That's led to demands across the country, including here in Vermont, for the "right to repair," the ability to perform basic repairs on items like smart phones, other electronics and more.

At 106 years old, Warren Patrick credits staying physically busy and making the right choices for his long, happy life.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

He's seen the change from oil lamps to electric lighting, and from the advent of radio to television and the computer. And modes of transportation shift from the horse and buggy to self-driving automobiles. At 106, Townshend's Warren Patrick finds happiness in every new day and gives thanks for it every night. 

Romeo, a Burnese Mountain Dog, owned by Pam Eldredge of Waterbury, competes at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.
Dalmi Sirabo

One of the major competitions in the canine world took place this week in New York City. The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show concluded Tuesday, Feb. 13. About a dozen dogs owned by Vermonters were among the field of 3,000 that competed this year. One of those dogs had an excellent show: Romeo, a Bernese Mountain Dog owned by Pam Eldredge of Waterbury.

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