Vermont Edition

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

About the show: Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel cover current events with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

Frequent bouts of rain and cooler weather than normal this summer have been annoying for recreation, but seriously problematic for Vermont farmers.

As more and more people rely on cell phones to stay connected, landline services, especially in rural areas, are becoming a challenge for providers. But those same customers are often the ones unable to rely on cell phones.
smiltena / iStock

Live call-in discussion: For some Vermonters, landlines remain a lifeline, a crucial service without many viable alternatives. But as more and more people switch to cellphones, providers are struggling to ensure the future of the traditional landline.

A new study shows that even a small amount of development around a lake can put the body of water at risk of salinization.
Wilson Ring / Associated Press

Here in the north country, we spread a lot of salt on our roadways to melt the ice that causes hazardous winter driving conditions. But that salt has to go somewhere.  Flora Krivak-Tetley, a PhD student in Biology at Dartmouth College, is part of a group of researchers with the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network that has been taking a look at how salt is affecting waterbodies from Maine to the Midwest.

An archaeological dig at Jamaica State Park in 2010 found ample evidence that the site was a seasonal fishing camp at least 7,000 years ago.
VPR FILE

When we discuss archaeology in Vermont, it's not about dinosaurs or the homesteads of noted figures who lived here. Instead, we focus on the things that the everyday people who preceded us  left behind as clues about their daily existence.

Nam Y. Huh / AP/file

Type 1 diabetes is a struggle for the kids who have it, and for their parents who keep a constant watch on them. And while the risks of not precisely managing the disease are enormous, technology is making huge strides in helping patients with the illness.

Yemenis present documents in order to receive food rations provided by a local charity, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, April, 13, 2017. A stalemated war with Saudi Arabia has pushed the Arab world's poorest country to the brink of famine.
Hani Mohammed / AP

What’s being called the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II is unfolding right now in the Horn of Africa and parts of the Middle East. And there’s a good chance that this is the first time you’re hearing about it.

A statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is removed from Lee Circle in New Orleans in May, the last of four monuments to Confederate-era figures to be removed.
Scott Threlkeld / Associated Press

The issue of how we judge historical figures has been in the news a lot lately. We're discussing how present-day perspectives can alter our view of the past.  

Annie Russell / VPR

The idea of growing the tech industry and developing a Vermont spin on Silicon Valley has a lot of appeal. But the state faces big challenges in terms of attracting and keeping talent and companies.

Middlebury College researchers have found that areas below 1,000 feet of elevation have 10 to 15 times the amount of ticks then at higher elevations.
SteveEllington / iStock

For such a wee little thing, the tick has sure garnered a lot of our attention. That's because it can carry Lyme disease and that's something none of us wants to experience.

We've learned a lot about how devastating opiate addiction is for families and communities but on the next Vermont Edition, we're taking the conversation about addiction to the cellular level.

A Hardwick log yard in 2004.
AP Photo/Toby Talbot

We hear a lot about Vermont's agricultural economy, but what about our working forests? Trees  cover more than 75 percent of Vermont. In past years the state's forest products industry has supported loggers, truckers and mills but its in decline and jobs and markets have been disappearing.

Stokes with his record-breaking fish.
Courtesy: Vt. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

One of Vermont's most accomplished anglers is 11-year-old Chase Stokes of Ferrisburgh, who recently entered the record books for a carp he caught in Otter Creek.

Emily Herr, who created this mural in Richmond, Virginia, is headed to Burlington to paint a wall as part of her Girls Girls Girls Mural Tour.
Emily Herr / HerrSuite

Emily Herr receives commissions to paint murals in her hometown of Richmond, Virginia. But it was one of her personal pieces, highlighting everyday women, that spawned a painting tour that will bring her to Burlington next week.

Herr shared her thoughts about what she calls the "Girls Girls Girls" Mural Tour with Vermont Edition.

The gloved hand of a biologist holds a little brown bat in Vermont.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

Stand outside at night and you might glimpse the swift, darting profile of a bat flying overhead. That sight wasn't rare in the past, but bats in this region have had it rough for years due to white-nose syndrome, and biologists are still working to understand and protect these tiny flying mammals.

John Locher / AP

Even after bowing out of the presidential race last year, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has continued to crisscross the country, marshaling his support for progressive causes and candidates. But as his popularity remains strong, Sanders is also answering allegations related to his wife's tenure as president of now-defunct Burlington College.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed rolling back net neutrality regulations. On this "Vermont Edition," we look at what the changes are and how they could affect internet users.
Kynny / iStock

Net neutrality is the concept that all data on the internet is treated equally. The Federal Communications Commission instituted these regulations during the Obama administration.

Now, those rules could be rolled back to allow internet providers to offer "fast lanes" for those willing to pay for that access.

Vermont will study how so-called 'rape kits' are processed into evidence, as part of a new law that Gov. Phil Scott signed on Tuesday, July 17, 2017.
Rick Bowmer / AP

The governor signed two bills on Tuesday that extend protections for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. Some of the changes have been long in coming for the advocates who work on these issues.

Dr. James Hudziak, a professor at UVM's Larner College of Medicine, developed an app to help coach college students on healthy behaviors. Hudziak has now received a $1.8 million grant to study the app's effectiveness.
PeopleImages / iStock

A University of Vermont program designed to help college students form healthy behaviors could go national with the help of nearly $2 million in grant money. 

Worshippers at the Islamic Society of Vermont in Colchester.
Oliver Parini

Earlier in July, Imam Islam Hassan assumed his new position as the imam of the Islamic Center of Cleveland. That's only of interest to us here because Hassan leaves behind the Islamic Society of Vermont in Colchester, where he was the first imam for a growing Vermont Islamic community.

The Guildhall Public Library dates from 1901. We're talking about how libraries fund the services they provide to Vermonters.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Among many other records, Vermont can boast more public libraries per person than any other state in the union. How those libraries get their funding is far from uniform; it can vary greatly from town to town. We're talking about how libraries get the money they use, how they deal with funding challenges, and how it all affects the services they offer to Vermonters.

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