Vermont Edition

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Monday, Nov. 27, 2017

Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017

About the show: Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel cover current events with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

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Vermont prides itself on a history of leadership on civil rights issues, but it doesn't mean that there aren't complications — many of them — to the narrative of Vermont's unbroken civil rights leadership.

It's American Archives Month, and former state archivist Gregory Sanford talked to us to illuminate some of the complications he's unearthed through his research in the Vermont state archives.

We're talking to a couple of the people behind a new UVM production of a play dealing with issues of incarceration and the death penalty in America.
powerofforever / iStock

The Exonerated tells the story of six death row inmates who were wrongfully convicted and later had their convictions overturned and were released. We're talking to the director and an actor from a new production of the play at the University of Vermont. We'll discuss the play itself and the big issues it explores around incarceration and the justice system.

As we learn more details about what happened last night in Las Vegas, you may be overwhelmed by your own heartbreak, fear, and anxiety. And it’s very difficult to know how to address what’s happening—or shield—the news from your children.

Mark Potok is one of the country's top experts on white supremacy, hate groups and right-wing extremism. He joins us to discuss the current climate in Vermont and across the country.
Valerie Downes, courtesy

Mark Potok joins us in our studio to discuss hate and the current political climate.

The Green Mountain Care Board is now under the direction of Kevin Mullin, a former Rutland state senator.
SteveColeImages / iStock

After Al Gobeille was selected to lead Vermont's Agency of Human Services, Rutland State Sen. Kevin Mullin was chosen to succeed Gobeille as chairman of the Green Mountain Care Board.

We're talking with Mullin about a payment reform plan the board is considering that changes how health care providers are reimbursed.

Sept. 24 through Sept. 30 is 2017's "Banned Books Week" across the country. Librarian Angele Mott Nickerson talked to "Vermont Edition" about how the state is marking the occasion.
AJT / iStockphoto.com

If you're an author whose book is banned or challenged, your work is in pretty good company. This week is "Banned Books Week" across the country, and Vermont Edition talked with librarian Angele Mott Nickerson of Shelburne's Pierson Library about how Vermont is marking the occasion.

Miles Anton, in FLAWS.
screenshot from an episode of FLAWS

Earlier this year a group of middle school students in Brattleboro decided to create a television program for a class assignment. The show is called FLAWS and it is co-directed by Miles Anton and Sam Freitas-Eagan.

President Chester A. Arthur - in cutout form - presides over the town office in Fairfield, Vermont back on Aug. 14, 2009. We're talking about Arthur's life and his unexpected presidency.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press

Former president Chester A. Arthur often gets short shrift — even here in the state of his birth, where he's frequently referred to as "Vermont's other president." Today we're giving Arthur some attention.

Many Vermont mobile home parks were built in the 1960s-1980s. We'll explore the role this housing option plays across the state.
clubfoto / iStock

About 10 percent of Vermonters live in mobile, or manufactured, homes. They provide an important option in a state where affordable housing can be difficult to secure.

Steve Wadsworth greets cows at Laggis Brothers Farm in East Hardwick with a kiss on Sept. 1. Wadsworth, a large animal vet who serves dairy farms, took "Vermont Edition" host Jane Lindholm on a tour of four farms earlier this month.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

We've left the studio in favor of a field trip on this Vermont Edition to see what goes on behind-the-scenes at four large dairy farms in Franklin and Caledonia Counties.

We got questions and comments from many of you after our discussion of Ben & Jerry's social mission with Will Allen. Here's some of what we found out.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR/file

Back in August, Vermont Edition had a discussion about whether Ben & Jerry's is fulfilling its social mission. We got a lot of feedback on that show, and a lot of it was critical specifically of some of the statements made by one of our guests, Will Allen.

e_chaya / Flickr, https://flic.kr/p/4wMeCa

A new study has found that Vermont is losing 1,500 acres of forest every year. That's in the context of a potential loss of more than 1 million acres in New England over the next 50 years. We're looking at the loss of forest cover and the consequences for the health of our landscape - from wildlife to water quality.

A recent study found that adding an apology to your rejection actually doesn't make it easier for the recipient.
draganajokmanovic / iStockphoto.com

Rejection is hard. It's not easy to accept, and for a lot of people, it's not easy to deliver a rejection. So why not mix in an apology to soften the bad news?

Well, a recent study found that actually makes it worse.

Teachers picketed outside the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes in Burlington on Sept. 14. A new bill to be considered during the 2018 session would prohibit teachers from striking in Vermont.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

More than half of the states in the U.S. prohibit teachers from striking. Should Vermont join them?

With over half of the state using septic systems, we talk with experts about how to keep yours operating properly.
BlakeDavidTaylor / iStock

We know it's not your favorite subject. But over half of the state has to deal with them. Yes, your septic system.

Turnpike Road in Norwich was damaged during flash flooding this past summer. VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman spoke to "Vermont Edition" about his recent stories looking at flood insurance.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

Flooding is a serious business, and VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman has been looking at the vital topic of flood insurance — which may not even continue to exist in its current form, with change occurring both in the climate and in Washington. He joins this Vermont Edition to talk about his reporting.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Parents of small children will know the angst of figuring out the best way to try to get them to sleep through the night.

Last Tuesday, people across New Hampshire and Vermont held their collective breath after word spread that there was an active shooter at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon.

A hospital is different from a school or other places where, at least in theory, everyone can evacuate if necessary. So what happens at a hospital in a situation like that?

Vermont's latest assessment scores showed a drop in math at every grade level tested and at all but two in English.
Lucentius / iStock

The report card is in, and we didn't do well. In the results from the 2016-17 Smarter Balanced Assessment test, Vermont students' average scores dropped at every grade level tested (3rd through 8th and 11th) in math and all but one grade in English.

Keeping kids with allergies away from certain foods is a serious business. We're talking about how schools handle the challenge.
jjpoole / iStock

Serious — potentially deadly — food allergies are on the rise among kids. We're looking at how schools manage these situations, with limited resources and a diverse population of children to keep educated and fed. 

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