Vermont Edition

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Monday, Nov. 27, 2017

Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017

About the show: Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel cover current events with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

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A fight in Burlington's City Hall Park led to a man being stabbed in the neck in August. We're talking about whether criminal penalties for repeated civil violations could stem this type of violence.
Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Incidents of violence in downtown Burlington - including two recent stabbings - have led the police chief and others to call for criminal penalties for racking up too many civil violations, like public drunkenness. On Monday, the city council passed a resolution taking a step in that direction.

Critics say it's a step along the path to criminalizing poverty and homelessness. We're hearing the debate.

This interview originally aired in September 2016: Ben Matchstick and Pete Talbot — the founders of the Cardboard Teck Instantute — stop by Vermont Edition with their cardboard pinball machine creation: the PinBox 3000. The duo talk to Vermont Edition about how the PinBox 3000 works.

This interview originally aired in April 2016: The high school members of the slam poetry group "Muslim Girls Making Change" — Balkisa Abdikadir, Hawa Adam, Lena Ginawi and Kiran Waqar — talk to Vermont Edition about the formation of the group, their inspirations, their writing process and their personal experiences in Vermont. Also, the group performs one of their original pieces "Wake Up America."

A replica of the Enterprise bridge set from the original "Star Trek" television series is seen here in Ticonderoga, N.Y. on Aug. 13, 2016 at "Trekonderoga." The set will now have a permanent home in the town.
Hans Pennink / Associated Press

Visitors to this past weekend's "Trekonderoga" Star Trek convention in Ticonderoga, New York, got to tour a near-perfect replica of the original series set, housed in a building downtown. Now thanks to a gift from the wife of an heir to the Mars Candy fortune, that building will become the set's permanent home.

Former Vermonter and award-winning chef Seamus Mullen talks to us about his latest book, "Real Food Heals: Eat to Feel Younger and Stronger Every Day."
Penguin Random House, courtesy

Award-winning chef Seamus Mullen grew up in Vermont and is now the owner of several New York City restaurants. And he says you can eat nutritiously while enjoying outstanding dishes.

The Vermont Supreme Court ruled that records of public business conducted on private email accounts are subject to the state's public records law.
Royalbroil / Wikimedia Commons

What are some of the major challenges facing Vermont’s court system? Does the system have the financial resources it needs to ensure that all Vermonters have access to justice?

We’re talking to Vermont Supreme Court Chief Justice Paul Reiber about some of the key issues surrounding Vermont’s courts.

Shani Stoddard, recent winner of Outright Vermont's "Drag Idol" competition, says he loves performing drag.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

For the last 14 years, the LGBTQ advocacy organization Outright Vermont has hosted "Drag Idol," where novice drag queens and drag kings are invited to perform in a drag competition. The 2017 Drag Idol winner was Shani Stoddard, who took home the $100 prize and bragging rights.

Antifa is the name given to anti-fascist groups.
Labsas / iStock

When white supremacists rallied in Charlottesville, Virginia, they were met with resistance from counter-protesters, including members of the antifa, the anti-fascist movement.

Antifa supporters say they are sending a strong message to neo-Nazis and white supremacists and they're not afraid to use violence or intimidation to get their point across. But some people worry that Antifa actually inflames the violence and is a threat to free speech.

A blue-spotted salamander poses for its close-up. We're checking in on the amphibians and reptiles of Vermont.
Kiley Briggs / courtesy of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas

Here's a word you might not know: herp (verb). It means to search for reptiles and amphibians. If you're a herper (noun) - either a dabbler or a full-blown frog freak - you won't want to miss this Vermont Edition. We're talking with local guru Jim Andrews; he'll give us an update on the cold-blooded world and answer your questions. 

Program originally aired in September 2015: A few years ago, we dispatched a team of producers and reporters to the Champlain Valley Fair and recorded sounds and stories. It's a great listen that we're bringing back again now that we're deep into fair season.

Earlier this summer, the state's economist told the Vermont Legislature that the revenue forecast for the rest of the year had been downgraded to the tune of $28 million.

Some of that gap had already been anticipated and addressed by lawmakers, but Gov. Phil Scott had to come up with a plan for how to cut the remainder out of the current budget. Last Thursday, Scott presented his plan to the LegislatureVermont Edition spoke with VPR's Peter Hirschfeld about how it went.

UVM President Tom Sullivan at a 2013 news conference. Sullivan has led the university since 2012.
Toby Talbot / AP

Colleges and universities have been at the center of some controversial issues lately. We're talking with University of Vermont President  Tom Sullivan about these issues and how they play out at Vermont’s largest public university. 

On this "Vermont Edition," we're talking about a new push for highway safety by state and local law enforcement across the state.
Doug Kerr / flickr

Following a recent rash of traffic fatalities, state and local law enforcement officials are conducting high-visibility campaigns to encourage Vermonters to use their seatbelts and to slow down. On this Vermont Edition, we're looking at efforts to improve highway safety in Vermont.

This piece originally aired in September 2016: In Rutland, a long-running radio show hosted by the late Joseph Chrusciel helped keep Polish music and culture alive for decades. Chrusciel, better known as "Uncle Joe" to his listeners, was a Sunday morning fixture for those who grew up in the area after World War II.

VPR's Nina Keck explored the history of Chrusciel's "Polish Hour" radio show and what it meant for the Polish community in the Rutland area.

Interview originally aired in May 2016: Vermont may be a small state, but it has produced many cartoonists over the years. Vermont Edition spoke to Rachel LindsayStephen Bissette and Robert Waldo Brunelle, Jr., who discussed why they became cartoonists, the business in the digital age and what the cartooning community in Vermont is like.

St. Michael's College graduates Danny Divis, left, and Justin McKenzie, right, throw out first pitches at the Boston Red Sox's "Vermont Night" at Fenway Park on Aug. 5. The two hockey players were awarded the Hockey Humanitarian Award last spring.
Dan Brown / Kapitol Photography

Danny Divis and Justin McKenzie, recent St. Michael's College graduates who played on the hockey team, started the mental health awareness campaign Hope Happens Here while they were students. This past spring they were recognized with the Hockey Humanitarian Award, a national honor for collegiate athletes who give back to their community.

Scientists say storms like this one in Waitsfield in 2010 are dumping more rain on the Northeast
Toby Talbot / AP

The draft National Climate Report both refines and underscores the impact of human activity on our climate. We're focusing in on the effects in Vermont and the Northeast.

Betty Smith Mastaler, seen here in 1978, talked to "Vermont Edition" recently about her first years at VPR and the state of the station.
VPR file

Aug. 13, 2017 marked Vermont Edition's 10th anniversary, and the 40th anniversary of Vermont Public Radio. To mark the occasion, we talked to someone who has been with the station for more than 40 years and has done a little bit of everything: Betty Smith Mastaler.

Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Next week, people across the country will turn their eyes - hopefully safely protected - to the skies to watch a rare solar eclipse. We're looking up too. We'll talk about the eclipse, and about stargazing, astronomy, and all the latest from space - including the dramatic final mission of the Saturn probe Cassini. 

Brittany Caine-Conley, Congregate Charlottesville's lead organizer, speaks to those gathered at a vigil on Sunday, Aug. 13 at the site where the day before a car crashed into people protesting a white nationalist rally in the city.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

White supremacy, violence and even death played out in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. On this Vermont Edition, we'll discuss how we talk about these recent events and also look at what we can do here to address the issues raised.

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