Vermont Edition

Weekdays at Noon & 7:00pm

Want to know what's happening on Vermont Edition?

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Monday, August 21, 2017

About the show: Vermont Edition brings you news and conversation about issues affecting your life. Hosts Jane Lindholm and Bob Kinzel cover current events with news makers and people who make our region buzz.

Tangled Up In Blue

Nov 8, 2012
AP/Andy Duback / Republican gubernatorial candidate Randy Brock gives his concession speech alongside his daughter Natalia Brock, left, and wife

http://www.vpr.net/audio/programs/84/2012/11/Spot-1107-08e-Jamaica Mitigation_110712_Keese_Im Susan Keese.mp3

Vermont was once a state of rock-ribbed Republicans, but its; Blue-state; status was solidified on Tuesday, with Republicans losing all but one statewide contest.So where does the Vermont GOP go from here? We take up that question Republican Representative Patti Komline and Oliver Olsen, a Republican who chose not to run for re-election to the House.

VPR/Ric Cengeri

Months of endless campaigning have finally concluded. So now we get down to looking at the statewide results and what they will mean for the direction of the state and the nation over the next several years.

Treasurer Beth Pearce and her opponent Wendy Wilton, Auditor-elect Doug Hoffer and Vince Illuzzi, House Speaker Shap Smith and Attorney General Bill Sorrell reflect on their races and look at what's ahead.

And VPR's Ross Sneyd and Valley News Editor John Gregg provide analysis of the Vermont and New Hampshire races.

AP / Vermont-born Presidents Chester A. Arthur and Calvin Coolidge.

Election Day has finally arrived and as voters head to thepolls, we learn about the American Presidency. Historian and Author Kenneth C. Davis' new book is Don't Know Much About the American Presidents. He joins usto explain why we have a President and not a king and sorts out the electoral college idea. He also looks at the accomplishments of the two Vermont-born Presidents - Chester A. Arthur and Calvin Coolidge.

Stuck In The Middle

Nov 5, 2012
Flickr/Photo Dean / Owning a home was once the hallmark of the middle class American Dream.

There's always a lot of talk about the 'middle class' during election season. But who exactly is the middle class? Do you consider yourself middle class? Can you afford to buy a house, send your kids to college, and take a vacation every year? We'll explore what the idea of middle class means in Vermont, and to you. Our guests are Elaine McCrate, professor of economics at the University of Vermont, and Marc Dixon, professor of sociology at Dartmouth College.

Toby Talbot / AP

All the campaign calls, handshakes, honk-and-waves and debates end Tuesday with the election. We take one last opportunity to evaluate this year's races.

VTDigger's Anne Galloway, Pete Hirschfeld of the Vermont Press Bureau and VPR's John Dillon join Bob Kinzel to look at the people and issues in all the statewide races. They also discuss the impact that Super PAC money has had in this campaign, particularly in the race for Treasurer.

VPR/Charlotte Albright / State Police Lieutenant Mike Henry and two St. Johnsbury Police officers during the search of a suspected meth lab.

We've seen a number of methamphetamine cases in Vermont lately. The ability to manufacture meth at home is one of the reasons for this rise. So, could someone in your neighborhood be running a meth lab?

U.S. Attorney Tristram Coffin and Spectrum Youth amp; Family Services' Annie Ramniceanu discuss the lure of this drug, why it's so easy to produce and the threat it may pose to your community.

AP/Toby Talbot / Governor Peter Shumlin seeks to win his second gubernatorial campaign next Tuesday.

VPR/Susan Keese / Wilmington as the rain and wind from Sandy started to hit the state.

From Vermont's perspective, Sandy was no Irene. But the superstorm did have some impact on the state.

We hear from Eye on the Sky Meteorologist Mark Breen on why Vermont was spared a major hit by Sandy. VPR's John Dillon reports on the Governor's update on the state of the state post-Sandy. And we get an update on power outages, volunteer opportunities and how Mad River Valley residents prepared for the storm.

AP/Jim Cole / Hurricane Sandy has caused flooding in many coastal towns. Here, Hampton, New Hampshire feels Sandy's wrath long before the

As Hurricane Sandy makes itself felt in our area, we hear from emergency management personnel, weather forecasters and VPR reporters on the impact of the weather system on our region.

VPR / State Senator Randy Brock.

State Senator Randy Brock is the Republican challenger to Governor Peter Shumlin's re-election bid. The two candidates disagree on a number of issues: from health care to renewable energy. We ask Brock what he would do as Governor of the state.

We also check in with the Red Cross and the state Department of Public Safety about their efforts to prepare for Hurricane Sandy.

VPR

When Governor Peter Shumlin named Jeb Spaulding as his Secretary of Administration, Beth Pearce was elevated to fill his position as Treasurer. She now faces challengers Republican Wendy Wilton and Progressive Don Schramm, in what has been the most contentious race of this election cycle.

Bob Kinzel hosts a debate of the three major party candidates as they outline their qualifications for the position.

Screen capture, CCTV / CCTV broadcasts a community forum at Saint Michael's College on the proposed basing of F-35s at the Burlington airport.

Long before You Tube, cable access television provided a place where people could tell stories and talk about issues in their own self-produced programs. The origins of public access television were a desire for open media and social change. We talk with Lauren-Glenn Davitian, executive director of CCTV and co-founder of public access in Vermont. And we're joined by David Bagnall, a documentary filmmaker and collaborator of George Stoney, who is widely credited as the founding father of public access television in the U.S.

Lt. Governor Phil Scott, left, and Progressive/Democrat Cassandra Gekas.

The lieutenant governor's office does not come with a lot of authority, unless the office holder is suddenly required to fill in for the governor.

We host a debate between the major party candidates for lieutenant governor: Republican incumbent Phil Scott and Progressive/Democrat Cassandra Gekas.

Jane Lindholmrsquo;s questions to the candidates:

AP/Toby Talbot / Canada geese lift into flight from a pond in East Montpelier.

Flocks of birds are crossing the skies. Which means it's time for the fall migration bird show. Naturalist and bird enthusiast Bridget Butler joins us to explore mysterious bird calls and bird behavior, explain how birds know when to migrate and the science behind the tell-tale V of Canada geese in migration.

AP/Seth Perlman / About 80 percent of Vermont teens take driver's education classes through their high schools.

Learning to drive is a rite of passage and huge responsibility for the 5,500 or so teens who get junior operator licenses each year in Vermont. Now, a new guide from the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles aims to help parents reinforce safety lessons as their teens get behind the wheel. We talk about the with Marty Dexter, who coordinates driver education for the Vermont DMV, and Jeff Larson of the Safe Roads Alliance, which authored The Parent's Supervised Driving Guide.

AP/Toby Talbot

Vermont's Attorney General is called the state's top law enforcement officer. Seven-term incumbent Bill Sorrell (D) is running for re-election and faces major party opposition from Jack McMullen (R) and Ed Stanak (P).

Video Deep Links - Attorney General's Debate

Listen to the entire debate, orc lick the topics below to jump to that section.

Bob Kinzel's questions to thecandidates:

Alcoholic. Writer. Marathoner. Caleb Daniloff has worn all of these labels, some of them more comfortably than others. His new memoir, Running Ransom Road recounts how he recovered from years of hard drinking, and how long distance running has helped his sobriety. We talk with Daniloff about his running, writing and recovery, on the next Vermont Edition.

State Auditor candidates Republican Vince Illuzzi (left) and Democrat/Progressive Doug Hoffer (right).

Vermont's Auditor of Accounts tracks how the state spends taxpayer money, and makes sure that government programs are performing the way they should. Current Auditor Tom Salmon is not seeking re-election this year, creating an open race for the position.

Candidates Vince Illuzzi (R) and Doug Hoffer (D/P) debate what they'd bring to the office of state auditor and explain why they'd be best to fill this role.

Video Direct Links - State Auditor's debate

Listen to the entire debate, or click the topics below to jump to that section.

AP/Toby Talbot / Temporary voting booths stand in the city council chambers in Montpelier during the 2010 primary.

Alison Redlich / AP

After serving for 10 years in the Vermont Senate, Phil Scott became the highest-ranking Republican in the state when he was elected Lieutenant Governor. Scott is now seeking re-election against Progressive/Democrat candidate Cassandra Gekas.

We talk with Phil Scott about how he's defined the role of second-in-command, and why he wants your vote in November.

Also on the program, VPR's Steve Zind provides an update on His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama's recent visit to Middlebury.

Pages