Vermont Garden Journal

Fridays at 5:55p.m., Sunday at 9:34a.m.

The Vermont Garden Journal is a weekly program hosted by horticulturalist Charlie Nardozzi. Each week, Nardozzi will focus on a topic that's relevant to both new and experienced gardeners, including pruning lilac bushes, growing blight-free tomatoes, groundcovers, sunflowers, bulbs, pests and more.

Hear the Vermont Garden Journal Friday afternoons at 5:55pm and Sunday mornings at 9:34am.

Subscribe to the Vermont Garden Journal Podcast and RSS

Visit the VPR Archive for Vermont Garden Journal programs before 4/19/2013.

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As the weather warms up, plants are popping out of the ground and so are the insects.

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It's Mother's Day and what better gift to give mom than a flower basket for her garden or patio.

Mojito cocktail with lime and mint in glass.
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This common perennial herb is known for its many medicinal and culinary uses. And since it's almost Kentucky Derby time, I'm talking about mint!

Different colored foliaged perennials have become very popular. Silver is a color that is often overlooked which I like for brightening dark areas and adding contrast.

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Looking around yards in Vermont, it's clear that raised bed gardening is quite popular. That said, I've put together some tips on building raised beds.

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Lavender is a beautiful plant in the landscape with gray-green leaves and sweet-scented, colorful flowers. There's nothing like viewing and smelling a field of lavender in bloom.

If you're looking for a tough plant to grow in your shade garden with Hostas and Hellebores, look no further than Astilbe.

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Earthworms are generally thought of as a sign of a healthy garden. But that's not the whole story.

Courtesy, pixabay

The beet is a popular root crop originating in North Africa. The root gained popularity in Europe first for its greens then for its root, which can be red, white, yellow or even striped. Some love it, while others loathe it.

With so much snow, you may need some alternatives to clover to help you celebrate St. Patrick's Day.
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There are many plants associated with St. Patrick's Day. The most popular is the Shamrock which is a type of clover. Since clover isn't growing yet, a suitable substitute is the Oxalis plant.

Spring flowerbed in forest.
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If you're looking for a colorful, blooming ground cover for areas under deciduous trees, consider planting Corydalis.

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If you want to get into a tangle with a veggie gardener, then discuss what you think is the best-tasting tomato.

Backyard overlooking golf course, flowerbeds and shrubs.
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Shade can be a curse from preventing you from planting your favorite sun-loving plants or an opportunity to create an interesting landscape. Let's focus on the latter.

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Muster up some patience when planting asparagus. You won't harvest until the third year but, once established, this perennial can produce for decades.

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Asclepias or Butterfly Weed is more than just a pretty flower; it's been used medicinally and for making fiber.

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The tropical Asian root loves heat and a long growing season, so you'd think it wouldn't grow well around here. But with a little help, ginger can — and now's the time to get started by planting roots indoors!

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Last summer, while leading a tour of gardens in England and Wales, I learned a few design tips that can work in any sized garden.

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Asian greens automatically make some gardeners think of Chinese cabbage or bok choi. But there are many others that may be worth a try in your garden this spring.

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The cyclamen plant was also used medically to treat depression and the tubers were even fed to pigs, hence the common name, "pig bread." With the proper care, it now makes a terrific indoor or outdoor plant.

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Come January, it gets a little hard to keep the kids and yourself entertained indoors. One way to build some excitement is to garden — but not like what you'll be doing outside in a few months — this is grocery store gardening.

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