Vermont Garden Journal

Fridays at 5:55p.m., Sunday at 9:34a.m.

The Vermont Garden Journal is a weekly program hosted by horticulturalist Charlie Nardozzi. Each week, Nardozzi will focus on a topic that's relevant to both new and experienced gardeners, including pruning lilac bushes, growing blight-free tomatoes, groundcovers, sunflowers, bulbs, pests and more.

Hear the Vermont Garden Journal Friday afternoons at 5:55pm and Sunday mornings at 9:34am.

Subscribe to the Vermont Garden Journal Podcast and RSS

Visit the VPR Archive for Vermont Garden Journal programs before 4/19/2013.

wysiwtf / flickr

Spring is time to get your soil ready for planting. Organic matter is key to soil health and building it with annual additions of compost is a good idea. But sometimes, especially in a vegetable or annual flower garden, there is a need to add more than compost. Annual flower and vegetable plants pull many nutrients from the soil. Based on a soil test you may find deficiencies and may need an organic fertilizer to help restore some balance.

Flict / Flickr

In a Mary Oliver poem, she says of this plant, “Most things that are important, have you noticed, lack a certain neatness.” Well, this is certainly true of bleeding hearts. This Dicentra family plant makes an early spring appearance as soon as the ground thaws. The grassy foliage quickly grows into a floppy 3 to 4 feet tall and wide plant that's loaded with heart-shaped flowers. The colorful flowers appear to have a trickle of blood dripping out the bottom, hence the common name, bleeding heart.

Skanska Matupplevelser / Flickr

Growing up, I was always told to never judge a book by its cover. Well, that applies to vegetables as well. Celeriac is not the prettiest of veggies. The dark green celery stalk and leaves are attractive enough, but its the root that's the problem. This gnarly, tan colored orb partially sticks out of the ground when mature and when you rip it out of the bed (it can be tenacious to pull out of the soil), I feel like it should be screaming like mandrakes from a Harry Potter movie. It's really not a pretty picture.

MonaMakela / iStock

On a cold, snowy night in February, I was invited to the Jericho Town Library to talk about seed saving. But this wasn't your regular home gardener audience. These gardeners have created a seed library. 

YinYang / iStock

Apples are as common to our landscape as maple trees. But one type, in particular, has multiple uses. This apple goes by odd names such as scroggy, bittersgall and sour grabs. The fruit were roasted and added to wassail. The Norse word for this apple means “scrubby” because the original varieties had thorns and multiple stems. We know this tree as the crabapple.

Adam Peterson / Wikipedia Commons

When is a potato also a bean and a nut? When it's a groundnut or the potato bean. Apios americana is a Native american vine that grows from the Gulf of Mexico through New England.

smphoto / iStock

This climbing, pea family vine hails from Asia, but there are species native to the US as well. It grows rampantly engulfing pergolas, arbors, fences, walls and cars. It's the wisteria vine.

Opiola Jerzy (Poland) / Wikimedia Commons

I'm a bit of a fruit freak. While others travel to exotic climes to enjoy the scenery, beaches and culture, I'm always looking for the fresh food markets to taste durians, dragon fruit and cherimoyas. While these sound exotic, we actually can grow some cool, unusual fruits in our climate too. One of my latest discovering is the honeyberry.

Dave Spindle / Flickr

This common perennial flower is of two minds. One version is tall and tidy with beautiful white, blue or pink flowers. Another is a low growing, native ground cover with blue, rose or white flowers that actually can become a weed. The common name speedwell, literally means to thrive. We mostly know this perennial as Veronica.

billnoll / iStock

If you thought potatoes were just those boring spuds found in bags in the grocery store, think again. Potatoes have a rich history and continue to be at the forefront of controversy around the world. This common global food has been the center of mass migrations of people and lawsuits challenging multi-national corporations. Not bad for an Andean spud.

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