Vermont Garden Journal

Fridays at 5:55p.m., Sunday at 9:34a.m.

The Vermont Garden Journal is a weekly program hosted by horticulturalist Charlie Nardozzi. Each week, Nardozzi will focus on a topic that's relevant to both new and experienced gardeners, including pruning lilac bushes, growing blight-free tomatoes, groundcovers, sunflowers, bulbs, pests and more.

Hear the Vermont Garden Journal Friday afternoons at 5:55pm and Sunday mornings at 9:34am.

Subscribe to the Vermont Garden Journal Podcast and RSS

Visit the VPR Archive for Vermont Garden Journal programs before 4/19/2013.

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VT Garden Journal
9:00 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: Carrots

Dean Fosdick AP

This vegetable has a reputation for providing great vision and a long life. During World War II the British disguised the fact they were employing radar to shoot down German bombers by saying their pilots possessed superior night vision by eating carrots. Industrialist Henry Ford loved carrots almost as much as cars believing they extended your life. He once presided over a 12-course meal featuring carrot soup, mousse, salad, pickled carrots, carrots au gratin, carrot loaf and carrot ice cream all washed down with carrot juice.

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VT Garden Journal
6:00 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: Catmint

Peter M. Fredin AP

Nepeta or catmint is one of my favorite plants. Of course, one of its members, catnip, is a particular favorite of cats. If you're having trouble keeping your catnip or catmint plants alive in the garden consider the old saying, “If you set it, the cats will eat it. If you sow it, the cats don’t know it”. Cats seem to dismiss seeded catnip, but love the transplants. But enough about Felix, let's talk about the beauty of catmint for us!

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VT Garden Journal
6:00 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: Straw Bale Gardening

Tomato plants flourishing in straw bales.
Tracy Walsh/Poser Design AP Photo

I've seen vegetables planted in just about everything. Whether it be old bathtubs, broken down cars, old shoes or even a used gas grill, gardeners can get creative when it comes to space saving techniques. Well, here's an old space saver that's come back to life in a new book. It's called straw bale gardening. Ruth Stout started it years ago and now Joel Karsten has got a new twist on this idea. Joel makes vegetable gardening less work and more productive by growing veggies in “conditioned” straw bales.

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VPR Blog
5:53 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Meet Charlie Nardozzi At The Shelburne Museum

Charlie Nardozzi
Image courtesy of Charlie Nardozzi

Vermont Garden Journal host Charlie Nardozzi is getting ready for spring and wants to help you get in the mood, too!

Charlie will present "Early Spring Gardening Tips" on Thursday, April 10th at 6:00 p.m. at the Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education at Shelburne Museum.

We'll begin the evening with a delicious "grazing dinner" by Sugarsnap, and there will be a cash bar for beer and wine. Charlie will share a presentation about early spring gardening, and the take your questions for the rest of the evening.

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VT Garden Journal
11:17 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: Unusual Annuals

The torenia plant.
Forest & Kim Starr Creative Commons

Are you tired of the same old impatiens, begonias and coleus in your shade flower bed? This year why not try some unusual annual flowers that will brighten up a dark area and provide months of color right until frost. Here are some of my selections for unusual shade loving annuals. These grow well in part shade, but do need some sun to flower well. They also grow best on moist, well-drained soil.

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VT Garden Journal
6:27 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: Tomato Blight

Daniel Hulshizer AP

We've all seen it happen. Your tomatoes are growing great with vigorous growth, flowers and even small fruits. Then it starts on the bottom leaves with some spots or browning. Slowly it spreads. Then more quickly to engulf the plant until by mid summer your prized tomatoes are nothing but stems with a few fruits. Welcome to the world of blight.

The main foliar diseases of tomatoes are early blight, late blight and septoria leaf spot. Although, they look a little different from each other, the results are the same. And they are more severe during cool, wet weather.

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VT Garden Journal
6:00 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: Nut Trees And Bushes

Walnut trees in sunlight.
PRNewsFoto/California Walnut Commission AP

Sometimes it's good to get a little nuts about gardening. Nut trees and bushes are great landscape plants providing shade, screening, food and shelter for wildlife and delicious nuts for us, too! Yes, many nut trees are slow growing, but they're landscape legacies. Maybe you or your children won't enjoy the 70 foot tall walnut tree, but you're leaving behind a tree for future generations to appreciate.

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VT Garden Journal
6:00 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: Sweet Peas

A sweet pea flower.
OldGreySeaWolf Morguefile

Sweet peas are known as the Queen of the Annuals. And why not, these climbers have vivid colored flowers that look like floating butterflies, a long season of bloom in our climate, and an amazing scent. The sensuous fragrance is a captivating blend of honey and orange with varying layers of subtlety. It invokes love, romance and passion. But I get carried away.

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Vermont Garden Journal
10:09 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: A Garden Riddle

Rendition Of Pisum Sativum Or Garden Pea
Wikipedia

I'm Charlie Nardozzi and this is the Vermont Garden Journal. Here's a quiz. What's this vegetable? It was first found in Egyptian tombs about 6000 years ago. Three quarters of a cup of this vegetable has more protein than an egg. Starch from this vegetable is used to make plastics. Only 5% of this vegetable are eaten fresh. What's is it? It's the garden pea.

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VT Garden Journal
6:00 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Vermont Garden Journal: Forcing Flowering Branches

A bee gathers pollen from the flower on a cherry blossom tree.
Julio Cortez AP

I love garden chores that, as they say, kill two birds with one stone. This chore will cheer up your home in winter and get your trees and shrubs in shape for spring. It's called forcing flowering branches. When you prune crowded, broken or damaged branches in winter, many of the tree and shrub stems you'll be cutting are perfect for forcing indoors. Their branches are loaded with flower buds and all they need is some warmth and water to open.

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