Vermont Garden Journal

Fridays at 5:55p.m., Sunday at 9:34a.m.

The Vermont Garden Journal is a weekly program hosted by horticulturalist Charlie Nardozzi. Each week, Nardozzi will focus on a topic that's relevant to both new and experienced gardeners, including pruning lilac bushes, growing blight-free tomatoes, groundcovers, sunflowers, bulbs, pests and more.

Hear the Vermont Garden Journal Friday afternoons at 5:55pm and Sunday mornings at 9:34am.

Subscribe to the Vermont Garden Journal Podcast and RSS

Visit the VPR Archive for Vermont Garden Journal programs before 4/19/2013.

YinYang / iStock

Apples are as common to our landscape as maple trees. But one type, in particular, has multiple uses. This apple goes by odd names such as scroggy, bittersgall and sour grabs. The fruit were roasted and added to wassail. The Norse word for this apple means “scrubby” because the original varieties had thorns and multiple stems. We know this tree as the crabapple.

Adam Peterson / Wikipedia Commons

When is a potato also a bean and a nut? When it's a groundnut or the potato bean. Apios americana is a Native american vine that grows from the Gulf of Mexico through New England.

smphoto / iStock

This climbing, pea family vine hails from Asia, but there are species native to the US as well. It grows rampantly engulfing pergolas, arbors, fences, walls and cars. It's the wisteria vine.

Opiola Jerzy (Poland) / Wikimedia Commons

I'm a bit of a fruit freak. While others travel to exotic climes to enjoy the scenery, beaches and culture, I'm always looking for the fresh food markets to taste durians, dragon fruit and cherimoyas. While these sound exotic, we actually can grow some cool, unusual fruits in our climate too. One of my latest discovering is the honeyberry.

Dave Spindle / Flickr

This common perennial flower is of two minds. One version is tall and tidy with beautiful white, blue or pink flowers. Another is a low growing, native ground cover with blue, rose or white flowers that actually can become a weed. The common name speedwell, literally means to thrive. We mostly know this perennial as Veronica.

billnoll / iStock

If you thought potatoes were just those boring spuds found in bags in the grocery store, think again. Potatoes have a rich history and continue to be at the forefront of controversy around the world. This common global food has been the center of mass migrations of people and lawsuits challenging multi-national corporations. Not bad for an Andean spud.

The Fern Lover's Companion / Flickr

This plant is millions of years old, predating dinosaurs. It's name means feathers because it has divided and delicate leaves. Historically people has believed this plant can provide good luck, protect you from lightning and give you magical qualities such as invisibility. What common plant is this? It's the fern.

kgtoh / iStock

One cold morning at breakfast, I was swatting small, black flies from my potted amaryllis and thinking, insects are opportunists. Even in winter, these bugs find a way to survive.

romrodinka / istock

Green shakes have gone viral. A few years back people would raise their eyebrows at the idea of drinking a kale or spinach shake for breakfast. Now, everyone is touting the benefits of green smoothies. It's become a gourmet trend. And why not? I find I have more energy starting the day with a green shake and it's a quick way to get some nutritious greens and fruits into my body.

professorphotoshop / istock

As I munch away at the last of our stored winter squash and potatoes, my attention moves towards the spring. Now is the time to assess your veggie seed stock and plan on what to grow for 2015. Here’s what I'll be trying.

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