VPR Classical

VPR Classical is Vermont's statewide classical music station. We bring you the broad world of classical music with a strong local connection: local hosts throughout the week, live performances, news about events in your community, and more.

VPR Classical hosts, clockwise from the top left: Kari Anderson, Walter Parker, James Stewart, Linda Radtke and Peter Fox Smith.

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Walter Parker | Peter Fox Smith | Linda Radtke | Kari Anderson | James Stewart | All Programs

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Boston Symphony Orchestra | BSO At Tanglewood | Chamber Music Society Of Lincoln Center | Chicago Symphony Orchestra | Exploring Music | From The TopMetropolitan Opera | The Met Live In HD | New York Philharmonic | Performance Today | Saturday Matinee | SymphonyCast | VSO On VPR Classical

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Vermont Symphony Orchestra

From the 2007 Made in Vermont Festival Tour
Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Anthony Princiotti, conductor

Dvorak: Serenade for Winds in D minor, Op. 44
Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings in C, Op. 48

Broadcast Wednesday February 3 at 8 p.m.

U.S. Public Domain

Composers were not the only ones who shaped the course of music. Sometimes a librarian influences the future in ways that no one could ever imagine. Baron Gottfried van Swieten is a name that isn’t too familiar in the musical world today but his work, energy and encouragement touched a generation of composers.

Autumn Bangoura

This month our student composer showcase features Gracie Bangoura, a sixth grader at Lyman C. Hunt Middle School in Burlington.

Musicians have been sampling other artists' songs for decades. Though some get into hot water when they blur the lines between homage and theft, when pop culture borrows a tune from classical music, it's usually more flattery than fines.

Edgar

Jan 26, 2016

We offer an introduction to Puccini's rarely performed opera Edgar, from a recording that features Placido Domingo in the title role.

Listen Saturday, January 30 at 12 noon.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Jaime Laredo, conductor
Peter Serkin, piano

Delius: Irmelin Prelude
Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat, Op. 83

Broadcast Wednesday January 27 at 8 p.m.

U.S. Public Domain

The years 1813 to 1816 were a dry period for Beethoven. He was wrestling with his health and with his family.

Opera in the 1840s

Jan 22, 2016

Wagner's opera Tannhäuser premiered in Dresden on October 19, 1845. This afternoon we explore what was happening elsewhere in the world of opera in the 1840s. We'll hear music by Verdi, Donizetti, Berlioz and Meyerbeer, among others.

Listen Saturday, January 23 at 12 noon.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Kodaly: Dances of Galanta  (Kate Tamarkin, conductor)
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 2 Little Russian  (Anthony Princiotti, conductor)
Mozart: Abduction from the Seraglio Overture  (Sarah Hicks, conductor)

Broadcast Wednesday January 20 at 8 p.m.

U.S. Public Domain

At the dawning of the 19th century, Beethoven had not given up hope that his doctors would find a treatment to reverse his hearing loss. His condition was not only affecting his musical output but also his social life, which was very important to him.

Duets

Jan 14, 2016

We hear some of the most beautiful duets in the opera repertory, including the "Letter Duet" from Le nozze di Figaro, "Prendi: l'anel ti dono" from La sonnambula, the final love duet from Der Rosenkavalier, and the Freedom Duet from Charpentier's Louise.

Listen Saturday, January 16 at 12 noon.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Mozart: Marriage of Figaro Overture  (Anthony Princiotti, conductor)
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5  (Jaime Laredo, conductor)

Broadcast Wednesday January 13 at 8 p.m.
 

Ludwig van Beethoven has been called the most admired composer in all of music history. His legacy stands as a monument for the entire 19th century and beyond.

Anna Bolena

Jan 8, 2016

Donizetti's Anna Bolena will be heard on the Metropolitan Opera broadcast this afternoon, with Sondra Radvanovsky in the title role. As Radvanovsky has been compared to Maria Callas, and in order to familiarize ourselves with some of the music, we shall precede the Met's performance with excerpts from a 1957 Callas recording of Anna Bolena.

Listen Saturday, January 9 at 12 noon.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

From December 2015:
Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Anthony Princiotti, conductor
VSO Chorus, Jose Daniel Flores-Carballo, director; Brenna Wells, soprano; Stefan Reed, tenor; David McFerrin, bass

Schubert: Mass No. 2 in G, D. 167
Dvorak: Symphony No. 8 in G, Op. 88

Broadcast Wednesday January 6 at 8 p.m.
 

Courtesy of Music-COMP

Each Month, VPR Classical highlights the work of talented young composers in the region, for a feature called the Student Composer Showcase. This January we’re doing something a little different, and dropping in on the compositional process as it happens.

U.S. Public Domain

Muzio Clementi was called the “father of the pianoforte”.  He earned this title, not because he played the instrument first, but because he played it best out of his generation.

We begin the new year with "new" voices: singers from the past who may be unfamiliar to you.

Listen Saturday, January 2 at 12 noon.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Delius: On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring  (Sarah Hicks, conductor)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat, Op. 55 Eroica  (Jaime Laredo, conductor)

Broadcast Wednesday December 30 at 8 p.m.

U.S. Public Domain

The rise of the American and French Revolutions were signs of deep changes in the Western world in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.   Not only was the Age of Enlightenment a period of political upheaval, It was also marked by economic change as a thriving middle class began to grow in Europe and across the sea in the new world.  This shift had very real and practical effects on the world of music.  It changed the way composers created work and supported themselves.

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