VPR Classical

VPR Classical is Vermont's statewide classical music station. We bring you the broad world of classical music with a strong local connection: local hosts throughout the week, live performances, news about events in your community, and more.

VPR Classical hosts, clockwise from the top left: Kari Anderson, Walter Parker, James Stewart, Linda Radtke and Peter Fox Smith.

Listen To VPR Classical
On The Radio | VPR.net | Smartphone | iPhone | Android | HD Radio | iTunes & More

VPR Classical Hosts
Walter Parker | Peter Fox Smith | Linda Radtke | Kari Anderson | James Stewart | All Programs

Playlists
Browse by day with the Playlist Calendar or by Program

Featured Programs
Boston Symphony Orchestra | BSO At Tanglewood | Chamber Music Society Of Lincoln Center | Chicago Symphony Orchestra | Exploring Music | From The Top | 'Messiah' Watch 2016 | Metropolitan Opera | The Met Live In HD | New York Philharmonic | Performance Today | Saturday Matinee | SymphonyCast | VSO On VPR Classical

VPR Classical Features
Live Performances | Musical Conversations | Student Composer Showcase | The Beethoven Project | Classical Music Timeline Podcast & Web Application

NPR Classical
Deceptive Cadence Blog | Classics In Concert | All NPR Classical

More
VPR Music's Holiday Playlist | Playlist Archive | Events & Regional Links | The Met Live In HD

VPR

Reuben Jackson returns to VPR Classical for a celebration of composers who had a "profound and enduring impact on a certain nerdy, young music lover growing up in Washington, D.C."

Broadcast April 29th at 10 a.m. and Monday, May 1st at 8 p.m.

www.orionweiss.com

Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Jaime Laredo, conductor
Orion Weiss, piano; Jennifer Montone, horn

Ravel: Le Tombeau de Couperin
Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25
R. Strauss: Horn Concerto No. 1 in E flat

Listen Wednesday April 26 at 8 p.m.

US-PD / Wikipedia Creative Commons

The art of writing down melodies, preserving sound in time, was not something that was first invented just 1,000 years ago. Humans have made music for most of our history, let's explore some of the earliest examples of musical notation. The first comes to us from a culture that’s nearly 3,400 years old.

Emily Taubl

Cellist Emily Taubl and pianist Paul Orgel give us a live preview of their UVM Faculty Recital.  Music will be by Beethoven, Chopin, Dvorak and Franck.

Listen Friday April 21 at 11 a.m.

Lucrezia Borgia

Apr 18, 2017

In the 19th century, Donizetti's most popular opera was not Lucia di Lammermoor but rather Lucrezia Borgia. We hear selections from a landmark recording that features Montserrat Caballé, Shirley Verrett, and Alfredo Kraus.

Listen Saturday, April 22 at 12 noon.

U.S. Public Domain

Music has always been created with a specific venue in mind. The composer may not know who will be in the audience or how it will be received but they know it has to be played on an instrument or sound system in a place. Throughout all of history, whether it was a church, a ballroom, a dance hall, an opera house or a dive bar, music was written to fill that location.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Brahms: Academic Festival Overture  (Raymond Leppard, conductor)
Dvorak: Symphony No. 6 in D, Op. 60  (Anthony Princiotti, conductor)

Listen Wednesday April 19 at 8 p.m.

Medea

Apr 11, 2017

Maria Callas is largely responsible for the re-kindling of interest in Cherubini's masterpiece Medea in the twentieth century. We hear excerpts from her November 6, 1958 performance in Dallas and from a 1989 recording in the original French.

Listen Saturday, April 15 at 12 noon.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Jaime Laredo, conductor

Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3
Schubert: Death and the Maiden Quartet, arranged for full symphony orchestra by Andy Stein.

Listen Wednesday April 12 at 8 p.m.

U.S. Public Domain

In the 20th century no medium affected culture more than film. The music written to accompany the images, story and dialogue has become a huge part of the movie-going experience. In many cases it’s impossible to separate the musical theme from the film itself; the two become one in our minds.

Courtesy of Vermont Chamber Artists

Jessica Pierpont is the artistic director of the newly formed Vermont Chamber Artists, a professional choral group based in Sharon, Vermont. The group has their first-ever concerts this weekend in Sharon and Thetford.

Mystery Excerpts

Apr 4, 2017

We hear four mystery opera excerpts (to be identified afterward) - plus a special visit from Anna Russell.

Listen Saturday, April 8 at 12 noon.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Jaime Laredo, conductor

Schubert: Symphony No. 8 in B minor Unfinished
Schumann: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat, Op. 97 Rhenish

Listen Wednesday April 5 at 8 p.m.

Courtesy of Music-COMP

For April's Student Composer Showcase we'll meet Andrew Kim, an eighth-grader at F. H. Tuttle Middle School in South Burlington.

Timeline: Minimalism

Apr 3, 2017
U.S. Public Domain

The music of the early 20th century was marked by increasing complexity and abstraction. Serialism and the chance practices of John Cage and his followers created an aesthetic that stood opposed to the Romanticism of the century before. In the '60s and '70s a counter-reaction began to emerge as a new group of young composers sought to free themselves from the strict rules of atonalism and serialism and embrace the simplicity of minimalism.

Courtesy of Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

World-renowned pianist Simone Dinnerstein sat down with VPR's Walter Parker for a live performance from VPR's Studio One to debut VPR's new Steinway concert grand piano.

Dinnerstein performed works from Philip Glass and Franz Schubert, and discussed working with young musicians and selecting the right instrument.

April 1 Delights

Mar 28, 2017

We celebrate this special day with a variety of musical excerpts featuring such artists as Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Feodor Chaliapin, Maria Galvany, The King's Singers, The Comedian Harmonists, Anna Russell, and Florence Foster Jenkins.

Listen Saturday, April 1 at 12 noon.

Every morning, for more than 75 years, American composer Elliott Carter would awaken and go to his studio to write music. Carter and his wife, Helen Frost-Jones, lived in the same apartment in Greenwich Village in New York, since 1945. He was one of the most prolific composers of the 20th century, composing over 40 works after the age of 90. Carter’s music encompasses many of the influences and styles that shaped the last 100 years of music.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Anthony Princiotti, conductor

Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake Suite
Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring

Listen Wednesday March 29 at 8 p.m.

Glenn Ross

Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Jaime Laredo, conductor
Judith Ingolfsson, violin

Peter Hamlin: Green Mountain Variations
Brahms: Violin Concerto in D, Op. 77

Listen Wednesday March 22 at 8 p.m.

Pages