Aging Well

Aging Well is an ongoing special series from VPR exploring how the baby boom generation is viewing retirement and changing the future makeup of Vermont.

 We’ll look at how this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to grow old.
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Live call-in discussion: By 2030, the number of Vermonters over 65 will grow by 50 percent. Baby boomers rarely do things the same way their parents did, and retirement is no exception. We're looking at how this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to grow old.

A yoga class at the Montpelier Senior Activity Center. The class' instructor, Sarah Parker-Givens, says the class offers many health benefits for students.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

When it comes to health care, studies show that people over 65 use far more services than younger people, but some new research is pointing at ways to reverse that trend.

I never think about getting older, but I do cultivate resilience.

Robert Oeser retired from his job as a patrol officer when he was 55, and started working part time a few years later.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The baby boom generation is rewriting the rules around aging, and the direction they take during retirement will have profound effects on the state’s economy.

I peered into my clothes closet the other day and had one of those epiphanies people my age sometimes have about the passage of time.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As the baby boomers head into retirement the decisions they make about where they want to live will have ripple effects throughout the state's housing market.

Here’s an existential question: If video killed the radio star, then what killed the video star? The surprising answer may be public media.

When my father turned 35, the average life expectancy for a white male in the United States was approximately 66 and a half years. His own father never retired because he worked up until he died.

The 30 members of the Reelin' n Rockin' music class at the Montpelier Senior Activity Center are learning the four-part harmony to the Turtles classic, "Happy Together." They're part of a wave of aging Vermonters viewing retirement differently.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

By 2030, it's projected that the number of people in Vermont over 65 will increase by 50 percent, thanks in part to the baby boom generation. And this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to be an older person in today's society.