Anthony Pollina

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Christine Hallquist speaks at a podium in Montpelier during a news conference.
Wilson Ring / Associated Press File

Party Chair Anthony Pollina says the Progressives want to see how Democratic gubernatorial candidate Christine Hallquist addresses some of the top issues facing the state during the next few weeks before they decide if they want to formally endorse her campaign.

Washington County Sen. Anthony Pollina discusses the Progressive agenda in Montpelier.
AP/Toby Talbot

Progressive leaders in Montpelier began the legislative session with a plan for Vermonters to pay their school taxes based on their income, rather than the value of their property. The plan failed to gain traction in both the House and Senate. We're talking with Progressive leaders about how their agenda has been received in the Statehouse this year.

Vermont Statehouse dome on a cloudy day.
Kirk Carapezza / VPR/file

A few years ago, Vermont enacted a law that tries to give the general public a bigger role in the budget writing process, but one legislator says the Scott administration isn’t following the spirit of the statute.

The Senate Health and Welfare committee plans to take a detailed look at a bill creating a publicly financed primary care system for all Vermonters
Chitose Suzuki / Associated Press

A plan to create a publicly financed primary health care system for all Vermonters will be a top priority for the Senate Health and Welfare committee during the 2018 session.

State officials are ramping up their outreach efforts to alert Vermonters that this Friday is the deadline to sign up for the Affordable Care Act
crazydiva / iStock

There were very few issues during the legislative session that were as partisan and divisive as the fight over teachers health care.

The exterior of the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier on a blue-sky day.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

A political confrontation over the issue of teacher health benefits has become the signature issue of the 2017 legislative session, but it’s being resolved almost entirely outside of the formal legislative process. The closed-door negotiations between a handful of Democratic lawmakers and the administration of Republican Gov. Phil Scott have shrouded the policy making process from public view.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

When lawmakers return to the Statehouse on Wednesday, one of the first items up for debate is a bill that creates an ethics commission in Vermont.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

Backers of legislation that would create an Ethics Commission in Vermont say they're optimistic about the future of their bill. But some critics argue that the proposal doesn't go nearly far enough to restore public trust in the operations of government.

Supporters of a proposed Ethics Commission in Vermont say they're disappointed that their plan didn't pass this session, but are already looking ahead to next year.

A proposal to create a Vermont Ethics Commission has been significantly scaled back at the Statehouse. But backers of the original plan still feel the stripped down approach is an important first step to help reduce conflicts of interest by public officials.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Progressive leaders at the Statehouse are backing a plan to make major changes in the way that Vermonters pay for education. As a first step, they're asking the House and Senate to support a comprehensive study of their proposal.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Vermont is one of just three states across the country without an ethics commission in place. Backers of the plan say this kind of panel is needed before major ethical problems emerge. But some key lawmakers remain skeptical about the idea.