Arts & Culture

A screen shot of the BHS "Register" on Thursday, Sept. 13, shows the school paper's article removed and a headline alleging censorship by the administration.
screen shot

Burlington High School’s director of guidance, Mario Macias, faces six charges of unprofessional conduct from the Agency of Education. The school paper, the BHS Register, broke the story last week, but for a time you couldn't read it there. That's because within 24 hours of publication, the story had disappeared from the paper's website, replaced with a mostly blank page with the words: “This article has been censored by Burlington High School administration.” 

Wilson Ring says hello to Murphy the Dog after the pooch's odyssey of more than a year finally came to an end.
Lucy Ring

In early 2016, a collective sigh of relief could be heard from the town of Waterbury when Murphy the Dog was caught and returned to its owners. For a year and a half, the community pulled together in an effort to find this amazing golden retriever. His odyssey is now an e-book called Catching Murphy, written by long-time Associated Press reporter Wilson Ring.

Board games of all types seem to be enjoying a resurgence of popularity even in the age of video games.
Huseyin Onur Cicekci / iStock

For decades, families and friends would gather over the Game of Life or Monopoly to compete and bond. And then along came Pong and other video games and Sorry got packed away. But now it's time to roll the dice or get into character because Vermont Edition is leaping into the world of tabletop games.

"Vermont Edition" explores overlooked, unknown, obscure or unusual gems of Vermont art, like Eden artist Matt Neckers' miniature mobile museum that recreates (on a smaller scale) the look and feel of a contemporary art museum.
Matt Neckers

There's no shortage of acclaimed art in well-known museums across Vermont, but surprising works are tucked away in unexpected places, in galleries off the beaten path or hidden in plain sight in buildings, campuses and towns across the state. We're talking about overlooked, unexpected and unknown art in Vermont and where you can find it.

The painting "Red Square" by Helen Frankenthaler.
Bennington College, Courtesy

Bennington College will sell works of art from its collection to help kick off a new scholarship program.

Members of Burlington-based band A2VT perform onstage
Julian Parker-Burns, Courtesy

From Africa to Vermont: That journey is the inspiration behind the name of the Burlington-based Afropop band A2VT, whose music is a mix of genres, including dancehall, hip-hop and Bollywood. The group recently dropped a new single, and their second album is due out in the fall.

nzphotonz / iStock

I’ve been wondering if we may be promoting a stereotype that no longer reflects the reality of a contemporary, inclusive Vermont – even perhaps contributing to some of the racism we’ve seen lately, like the public attacks on Bennington Representative Kiah Morris and her family, or the incident at a Stowe youth camp where racist remarks left children shaken and afraid.

The way villains are portrayed in fiction may help shape political views. We're talking about that, and other ways that entertainment can affect ideology.
Roger Murmann / flickr

Our politics and ideology are shaped by our upbringing and life experience, but a UVM political scientist says there may be another key component to what we believe and who we vote for: the fictional stories we're exposed to in books, movies, and television. We're talking about how entertainment can shape our politics - from Game of Thrones to House of Cards and The Hunger Games

Construction happening outside the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts on Main Street in Burlington.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

The Flynn Center for the Performing Arts is working to repair damage caused by a water main break early Monday morning.

Since Barrie Dunsmore died last Sunday, he’s been my constant companion – rowing with me on the lake as the sun rises, walking around meadows and offering amusing peanut gallery perspectives on the news. It’s odd that when people die, they seem not gone but ever closer.

Jim Condon speaking at Montpelier's Capitol Plaza Hotel.
Condon For Colchester website

Jim Condon, a prominent Vermont broadcaster and state representative for Colchester, died last week from esophageal cancer. He was 60 years old.

Schubart: Aretha

Aug 28, 2018
Bill Schubart

As a student fascinated with recording technology, I had the privilege of interviewing for a job at Columbia Records when I was in my mid-twenties. I was asked a lot of questions about production and then asked to critique a recent Columbia release from a technical and creative standpoint. The album was Aretha’s last album for Columbia.

Barrie Dunsmore speaks at a podrum with a VPR sign behind him at a VPR's 2014 commentator brunch.
VPR File

Journalist Barrie Dunsmore was a familiar face to national television audiences for 30 years, covering international news for ABC. For seven years he served as the network’s senior foreign correspondent.

Jackie and Jim Heltz's film "Lake Effect" examines recent Dartmouth-HItchcock research around cyanobacteria and ALS.
Jackie Heltz / Courtesy

In the last few years, researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center have been looking into a possible connection between cyanobacteria from blue-green algae blooms and the neurodegenerative disease ALS.

The research is preliminary, so any possible correlation is not proven. But the studies — and the issue of algae blooms in northern New England — are the subject of a new documentary by Jackie Heltz, a filmmaker who grew up in Williston.

Young Writers Project: 'A Celestial Body Of My Own'

Aug 24, 2018
St. Albans-based poet Lonna Neidig this week addresses the conflicts that occur in some interfaith relationships.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Zoe Maxwell, 14, Burlington, Vermont

I.
He told me to stop being an atheist.
He acted as if my tortured soul
couldn’t be salvaged unless I repented
and believed wholly in something larger.
He looked at me with sad eyes
and begged me to believe,

Catherine Flaherty does a one-handed handstand on top of pedastal on Burlington's Church Street.
Carolyn Shapiro / For VPR

If you’ve ever stopped to watch a street performer and dropped a few coins or dollars into the hat, you might think it’s just chump change. But many of those magicians and jugglers work the streets as a full-time job – and manage to make a good living at it.

Ram: Language As Destiny

Aug 23, 2018
Benjamin Barkley / The Lowcountry Digital History Initiative

Born into slavery in Charleston, South Carolina, Samuel Williams came to Vermont as a young man when the Civil War ended and lived in Springfield and Windsor, where he found a life of freedom and raised a family.

Christy Mihaly's first illustrated book for children is a rhyming picture book about making hay.
Holiday House publishers, courtesy

Vermont’s farms are the stuff of legend. The iconic barn, the determined farmer, the sturdy tractor and fresh-cut fields bursting with towering bales of hay. But you wouldn't be the first to realize — hey, there are no stories about hay!

East Calais author Christy Mihaly's new illustrated children's book aims to fill that gap in your child's bookshelf.

James A. Cumming

I never thought too deeply about the details of what it takes to keep New England looking – well – like New England.

The mural in Burlington reflects 400 years of Vermont history but has drawn criticism for lacking diversity.
Adam Fagen / Flickr

The mural should move: that's one of several recommendations from a seven-member task force convened by the Burlington City Council to look at the controversy surrounding the Everyone Loves A Parade! mural on Leahy Way, just off of Burlington's Church Street pedestrian thoroughfare. 

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