Arts & Culture

Ram: Language As Destiny

Aug 23, 2018
Benjamin Barkley / The Lowcountry Digital History Initiative

Born into slavery in Charleston, South Carolina, Samuel Williams came to Vermont as a young man when the Civil War ended and lived in Springfield and Windsor, where he found a life of freedom and raised a family.

Christy Mihaly's first illustrated book for children is a rhyming picture book about making hay.
Holiday House publishers, courtesy

Vermont’s farms are the stuff of legend. The iconic barn, the determined farmer, the sturdy tractor and fresh-cut fields bursting with towering bales of hay. But you wouldn't be the first to realize — hey, there are no stories about hay!

East Calais author Christy Mihaly's new illustrated children's book aims to fill that gap in your child's bookshelf.

James A. Cumming

I never thought too deeply about the details of what it takes to keep New England looking – well – like New England.

The mural in Burlington reflects 400 years of Vermont history but has drawn criticism for lacking diversity.
Adam Fagen / Flickr

The mural should move: that's one of several recommendations from a seven-member task force convened by the Burlington City Council to look at the controversy surrounding the Everyone Loves A Parade! mural on Leahy Way, just off of Burlington's Church Street pedestrian thoroughfare. 

Young Writers Project: 'Sunlight In A Storm'

Aug 20, 2018
Cambridge, Vermont, writer Ila Campbell reads her piece titled, "Sunlight In A Storm" for this week's Young Writers Project.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Nora Wootten, 13, Cornwall, Vermont

Thunder pounded my chest.
All I saw was a haze;
I was lost in a daze.
The lightning struck –
and I was out all out of luck.

Tim Kavanagh turned his rectal cancer diagnosis into a one man comedy show.
Tim Kavanagh, courtesy

Tim Kavanagh is a Vermont-based entertainer who's worked on variety shows, stage productions and improv comedy. When he was diagnosed with rectal cancer, he applied that humor to his diagnosis, treatment and surgeries to create what he calls his "self-defecating, one-man comedy show."

A stack of newspapers on a white background.
bernie_photo / iStock

“We are not the enemy of the people." That's the message being sent out Thursday to readers of newspapers all across the country, in a coordinated effort spearheaded by the editorial staff at the Boston Globe in response to President Donald Trump's frequent attacks on the media.

Novelist Anna Katharine Green, top left, and her late 1800s novels like "The Leavenworth Case" and "Marked Personal" created the template of modern detective fiction.
Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

You may have never heard of the novelist Anna Katharine Green. But if you’ve ever read a detective novel, or followed the sleuthing exploits of Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple or even Inspector Gamache—you’ve been enjoying the countless authors who followed in Green’s footsteps.

Photograph by Todd R. Lockwood / Burlington City Arts

Efforts to defund the National Endowment of the Arts are a quadrennial budget issue here at home. And in many countries, artists, like journalists, are censored, jailed, or even assassinated.

Young Writers Project: 'Dublin'

Aug 10, 2018
Charlotte, Vermont, writer Courtney McDermott wrote about her two weeks spent in Ireland for this week's Young Writers Project selection.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Madi Cohen, 16, Jericho, Vermont

Seagulls cry for the ocean,
wings flapping,
bodies soaring
through the smoky,
salty air.

AP


We like to think of Vermont as an honest, open-hearted place. Would national politics ever cloud or distort that? Perish the thought!

Angela Evancie / VPR

You know the feeling. You’re driving along, somewhere in Vermont, and you turn onto a road with an intriguing name. And you wonder where it came from.

Young Writers Project: 'Tangled Roots'

Aug 3, 2018
Weybridge writer Maddie Crowne expresses that heartbreak occurs even when platonic and mutual.
YWP Photo Library, painting by Ada Shookenhuff, 13, Bakersfield

When two trees surface
into the wrenching winds,
the longing currents and
the undeniable horrors
that cannot be avoided,

"Skip To The End" is the latest graphic novel written by Middlebury author Jeremy Holt.
Insight Comics / Justion Holt courtesy Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Music has the power to transport listeners across time, evoking memories of the past and whisking the listener back to a different age and place.

In his new graphic novel Skip To The End, Middlebury author Jeremy Holt explores how the right piece of music can take a listener back to their youth, to what they were wearing, who they were in love with. And maybe to just moments before something went wrong. 

The exterior of Memorial auditorium with a sign in front.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

The city of Burlington wants people who live and work there to weigh in on redevelopment plans for Memorial Auditorium.

Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

The city of Burlington is polling residents for ideas on how to re-develop Memorial Auditorium, hopefully an easier task than trying to save the hulking Moran Plant on the lakefront.

Eugene Jarecki's new documentary is "The King."
Eugene Jarecki, courtesy

Eugene Jarecki is an Emmy Award- and Peabody Award-winning documentary filmmaker who has looked at America from many different angles. His latest work, The King, unpacks the American dream through a road trip visiting key sites from the life of Elvis Presley. We're talking to Jarecki about Elvis, music, culture and where he sees the country going.

Author Rick Winston's book "Red Scare In The Green Mountains" looks at the era of McCarthyism in Vermont from 1946 through 1960.
Rootstock Publishing, courtesy

Blacklists and attacks on the free press. Intolerance and fear used for political gain. The Red Scare and anti-communist McCarthyism flourished across America—and Vermont—in the 1940s and 50s. We're talking with author Rick Winston about his new book looking at instances of "red scare" and "red-baiting" in Vermont.

Young Writers Project: 'Flamingo'

Jul 27, 2018
Poet Greta Solsaa of Rutland, Vermont, makes a pointed study of a particular ornament we are all familiar with: the lawn flamingo.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Samantha Aikman, 14, Richmond, Vermont

Sagging,
the age-old yet new
flamingo would be half dead
if it were alive.
Dug into the half-live
ground, it stands like
a beach ball
in a deflated summer,
or maybe an inflated winter.

Jeff Tolbert lounges among the cast of Aunt Jack, which will be performed at the Chandler in Randolph on Saturday, July 28.
courtesy of Jeff Tolbert

Every year since 2011, the Chandler Center for the Arts in Randolph has hosted a Pride Theater Festival to highlight LGBTQ playwrights and productions. This year, the festival is staging three plays including Aunt Jack, a play about family and intergenerational tension in the LGBTQ community.

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