Arts & Culture

"The Long Shadow" by Beth Kanell is set in the Northeast Kingdom in the run-up to the Civil War.
images courtesy of Beth Kanell

A new historical novel geared to a teenage audience tells the story of a young woman in the Northeast Kingdom in the run-up to the Civil War. Author Beth Kanell says she wrote the novel in part to challenge Vermonters on how they think about the state's history in relation to slavery. 

Old Stone House Museum Director Molly Veysey and Deputy Director Walter Parenteau stand in front of the Orleans County Historical Society building and under the sign.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Next week the Old Stone House Museum, in Brownington, opens for the season. And the Orleans County Historical Society’s museum has a pair of new leaders with some big ideas for the popular school field trip destination.

An issue of "Vermont Life" magazine on a table.
Henry Epp / VPR File

Vermont's long-running promotional magazine will end print publication this month.

LGBTQ Vermonters can face unique challenges and needs in rural areas.
ukayacan / iStock

Vermont has been seen as a leader in equal rights for LGBTQ people, but queer Vermonters living in rural areas can face unique challenges, from accessing healthcare to aging well as a queer senior to finding support networks. We're talking about the needs and experiences of LGBTQ Vermonters in rural communities. 

Young Writers Project: 'Very Far Away'

May 7, 2018
YWP Photo Library, photo by Emma Brott, Essex Junction

Once upon a time, in a land very far away, a perfect world was lived. In this world was a single country. There, everyone had a say, and everyone had a choice. In this perfect world, everyone accepted and loved each other. Everyone was family, and everyone agreed. Agreed on what, you might ask? Well, let's just say that there were no disputes on whether or not the country should launch a missile on other living people. For some absurd reason, they always agreed against it.

Men work in a granite processing facility.
Vermont Historical Society

There was a time when it was totally normal to hear French spoken in some of Vermont’s smallest towns and biggest cities.

Vermont author Kimberly Harrington writes about the intersection of parenthood, work and social media in her new memoir.
Isaac Wasuck

Towards the beginning of her new book of essays, Vermont author Kimberly Harrington includes a short satirical piece titled "Just What I Wanted, a Whole Twenty-Four Hours of Recognition Once a Year." It's a good read for this time of year, as we approach the beloved/dreaded holiday known as Mother's Day. (It's Sunday, May 13, in case you were wondering.)

Yvan Plouffe shows off some of his pottery creations. He took up the craft 10 years ago at the age of 70.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Charlotte's Yvan Plouffe is a retired dairy farmer who sugars, tends to his plum and peach trees, and raises 10,000 roses every year to hand out all around town. He also does woodwork, metalwork and pottery, the latter of which he took up just ten years ago at age 70. And he lives in a house he built himself, along with most of the furniture inside of it.

Contra and other forms of country dance have a lasting appeal. We're talking about the history behind the tradition.
Sterling College / Flickr

It's a centuries-old tradition with a wild history and deep New England roots. We're talking about American country dancing, including contra dance. We'll hear from the author of a book that traces the story of this tradition, and we'll talk about how and why it still appeals to so many people today.

VPR President & CEO Robin Turnau.
Daria Bishop

Robin Turnau, who has served as president and CEO of Vermont Public Radio since 2009, is stepping down from her position on May 4th. She first started working at the station in 1989 as a membership and volunteer coordinator.

Succeeding Turnau as CEO and president is Scott Finn, formerly of West Virginia Public Broadcasting. Before her departure, Turnau spoke to Vermont Edition about her time at VPR and where she thinks that the station is headed.

A wall display at Northfield Elementary School featured the covers of all this year's nominees for the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Award.
Meg Malone / VPR

Dorothy’s List readers have cast their ballots and the results have been tallied. The winner of this year’s Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Award is the World War II novel Projekt 1065 by Alan Gratz!

Eight students sit in a library holding up copies of Firoozeh's Dumas' novel "It Ain't So Awful, Falafel."
Meg Malone / VPR

At the Orchard Elementary School in South Burlington, students come from a variety of cultural backgrounds. In fact, about a third of the students speak a language other than English at home. 

Last fall, a group of Orchard fifth-graders gathered to discuss It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel, a novel about an Iranian-born girl living in California in the late 1970s and early 1980s – much like author Firoozeh Dumas.

Young Writers Project: 'Charging My Heart'

Apr 27, 2018
 she recognizes and embraces a beautiful connection – one that exists between her own expression and release through writing, and the love interest both inspiring and distracting her.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Abigail Harkness, 16, Shelburne, Vermont

Something is clogging up
the writing part of my brain,

the part with twists and grooves,
like my willowy, grainy cursive,

Coprid / istock

Why is tape sticky? How do erasers erase? We'll tackle arts and crafts in this episode, answering not just those two questions but learning how to make paint out of rocks and spit!! Vermont artist and wildcrafter Nick Neddo joins us with some tips on how to create your own paint and art supplies.

SoundCheck members pose onstage at Peoples Academy. Back row (L-R): Brian Boyes, Elizabeth Autorino, Ruby Klarich, Liam Mears, Wilson Knight, Paige Thibault, Bruno John. Front row (L-R): Cameron Mueller-Harder, Grace Carlomango, Logan "Loganic" Wedge.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There’s been an upswing of student activism in 2018, from Black Lives Matter flags flying at schools to school walkouts against gun violence. Now there’s a group of Vermont students providing a soundtrack for those actions.

After months of searching, the fourth annual Tiny Desk Contest winner has been announced!

Richard Svec / Cavendish Historical Society

This spring, the Vermont General Assembly passed a resolution commemorating the 100th anniversary of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s birth.

We're talking about philosophy as a discipline and a way of thinking - and its relevance to everyday life.
Jakarin2521 / iStock

Philosophy can get a bad rap as a subject only for scholars and academics, with little use in the real world. But many in the field say that philosophy doesn't have to be inaccessible; it can be a tool we use to tackle a wide range of the problems that we face every day. We're delving into this ancient subject and exploring how philosophy is relevant today.

Exterior shot of the Rutland Free Library, a brick building.
Nina Keck / VPR

Nearly 150 people, including the city’s mayor and other local leaders, gathered Thursday evening at the Rutland Free Library to celebrate a renovation project that many in the community helped complete.

Young Writers Project: 'Nightmare'

Apr 20, 2018
Burlington writer Rae Earley reflects on a false vision from a nightmare and the emotions she cycles through upon wakening.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Alyson Katon, Essex Junction, Vermont

I always thought that a nightmare had to be a dream provoking fear in someone. But I now know that that is not true. A nightmare can be any unpleasant or distressing dream that causes anger, grief or fear. That night when I woke up with my pillow wet, my cheeks dampened with salty tears and my eyes red not only from sleep, I knew I had had a nightmare. And not just any nightmare – a deep, powerful one that stirred up a whole storm of emotions.

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