Arts & Culture

(From l to r) Frog Hollow director Rob Hunter takes a floor mop to the interactive mural designs to make way for a new one; chalk pieces used to create mural; artist Tara Goreau pauses during drawing session; a young artist joins Goreau.
Rob Hunter/Frog Hollow, courtesy

The medium is impermanent but the artists and organizers behind the Community Interactive Mural project hope its imprint lingers.

Bookstock Literary Festival, courtesy

This weekend and next, plan on attending two unique concerts, a book and literature festival and a reading with a former poet laureate.

A statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is removed from Lee Circle in New Orleans in May, the last of four monuments to Confederate-era figures to be removed.
Scott Threlkeld / Associated Press

The issue of how we judge historical figures has been in the news a lot lately. We're discussing how present-day perspectives can alter our view of the past.  

Harry Bliss, a longtime illustrator and cartoonist stands outside his New Hampshire home, where he will be hosting a fellowship for burgeoning cartoonists. The house happens to have been the residence of the famously reclusive author, J.D. Salinger.
Rebecca Sananes / Vermont Public Radio

The Center for Cartoon Studies and illustrator Harry Bliss are inviting a new generation of cartoonists to apply for a fellowship at Bliss's house. The well-known illustrator lives in the former home of a well-known author: J.D. Salinger.

Weston Playhouse Theatre Company, courtesy.

The three long-time artistic directors at the Weston Playhouse Theatre have announced they will step down after next year’s season. 

Emily Herr, who created this mural in Richmond, Virginia, is headed to Burlington to paint a wall as part of her Girls Girls Girls Mural Tour.
Emily Herr / HerrSuite

Emily Herr receives commissions to paint murals in her hometown of Richmond, Virginia. But it was one of her personal pieces, highlighting everyday women, that spawned a painting tour that will bring her to Burlington next week.

Herr shared her thoughts about what she calls the "Girls Girls Girls" Mural Tour with Vermont Edition.

Next Stage Arts, courtesy

A prescription for a great weekend: try three very different plays and one night of tango!

Julia Luckett Photography

"When you're in a band and especially when you're touring, it's like being in a big marriage." That's the take from guitarist Nick Wood, with the Burlington-based funk-rock band, Gang of Thieves.

Wood and band-mate Tobin Salas, who plays bass guitar, recently sat down with VPR, fresh off the group's Work Together tour.

The Vermont Pride Theater Festival will be running the next two weekends at Randolph's Chandler Center for the Arts. After seven years, the Pride Theater Festival is an established part of the cultural life of Randolph.
Steve Zind / VPR

A small central Vermont community might seem an unlikely venue for the Vermont Pride Theater Festival, but organizers say it's the perfect place to present a series of plays focused on LGBTQ themes.

Musicians and child care advocates gathered at a Burlington recording studio last week to work on the arrangement for 'Something Beautiful'. Shown here, from the left, are Chris Dorman, Anna Gebhardt, Kat Wright, Bob Wagner and Josh Weinstein.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

If all goes as organizers plan, a 1,000-person flash mob will be singing and dancing on Church Street in Burlington October 1 in support of adequate early childhood care for Vermont's kids.

Victoria Quine leads a class during the New England Center for Circus Arts camp Wednesday.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The entire board of trustees of the New England Center for Circus Arts stepped down Wednesday. The board members announced their decisions late in the day after accepting the resignation of the embattled executive director Michael Helmstadter.

The Guildhall Public Library dates from 1901. We're talking about how libraries fund the services they provide to Vermonters.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Among many other records, Vermont can boast more public libraries per person than any other state in the union. How those libraries get their funding is far from uniform; it can vary greatly from town to town. We're talking about how libraries get the money they use, how they deal with funding challenges, and how it all affects the services they offer to Vermonters.

Men panning for gold in an 1887 photograph from the Plymouth Historical Society.
E. G. Davis / Plymouth Historical Society, courtesy

You've probably heard about the California gold rush of 1849 — but did you know that Vermont had its own mini-gold rush beginning around that same time?

The New England Center For Circus Arts' summer camp has been proceeding through the turmoil. About 6,000 people take lessons over the year.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The executive director and president of the board of directors agreed to step down from the leadership of New England Center for Circus Arts.

The steeple on the Unitarian Universalist church at the head of Church Street in Burlington.
Historic American Buildings Survey / Library of Congress

A simple question about the history of Burlington's Church Street yielded some interesting trivia about the city, and the commercial district that now defines downtown.

Serenity Smith Forchion, left, and her twin sister Elsie Smith started the New England Center for Circus Arts in Brattleboro. A volunteer board fired them this week.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The New England Center For Circus Arts board of directors has fired the organization's founders, and supporters are rallying to their defense as the group faces an uncertain future.

Burlington-based band Swale has been together for 15 years. In July, they released their third album, "There's No One Here."
Shem Roose, Courtesy

Broadly speaking, the Burlington-based band Swale plays rock songs — though labeling their music that way is a little like filling a paint palette with just one color. 

People of all abilities can find hiking trails to suit them in Vermont. (Some are muddier than others.)
Patti Daniels / VPR

These long summer days in Vermont are fantastic, but how do you get the most out of the season without breaking the bank? We crowd-sourced your ideas for inexpensive — better yet, free! — ways to enjoy summer.

Remember Rhode Island’s disastrous deal with former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling? The state invested $75 million of taxpayer dollars in Schilling’s video game company 38 Studios and lost it all before a lawsuit clawed back most of the money. It was one of the worst financial decisions in Rhode Island history. Yet the company that served as the state’s financial adviser on the deal has continued doing business throughout the state.

Last year's Do Good Fest welcomed over 5,000 spectators on the lawn at National Life headquarters in Montpelier. Again this year, the event is free and the $20 parking fee benefits Branches of Hope.
National Life, courtesy

This Saturday, the National Life building in Montpelier is opening up its "back lawn" and inviting a few friends over. It's the 4th Annual Do Good Fest, underwritten by the financial services company and boasting a musical line-up of national and local performers.

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