Arts & Culture

A new podcast aims to amplify the voices of LGBTQ Vermonters of color. It's called Brown 'n Out and it's hosted by Reggie Condra.

Local comedian Tina Friml performs at "Comedy And Crepes" at The Skinny Pancake in Burlington on Nov. 27, 2017.
Anna Ste. Marie / VPR

Tina Friml, an up-and-coming local comedian, set the stage of a recent performance by describing herself as “a bit of an enigma.”  At age 24, she has quickly gained popularity for her unique — and almost taboo — style. She avoids some of the more typical comic fodder like dating and the workplace. Instead, Friml jokes about what it’s like to live with a disability.

Young Writers Project: 'Real Americans'

Feb 9, 2018
Isabel Blankenbaker writes in response to the Young Writers Project prompt asking what it means to be a real American.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Hazel Civalier, Burlington, VT

Calling all the real Americans!
I’ve voiced it before and I know what it means.
I remember the term, but not pleasantly.
I suck in breath, knowledge seeping in.
I know where I’ve heard it before:
in a small sleepy town,
where they used it against me.

Awesome Etiquette: Familiar Strangers On A Train

Feb 9, 2018
istock

If you have a morning commute via bus or train into work, you might use that down time as a chance to catch up on a book or to listen in to your favorite podcast. But what happens when, each morning, a co-worker who takes the same public transportation, would rather chat during your whole commute?

This week, enjoy one-acts about love in Morrisville, Latin jazz in Williston, a poetry slam in Montgomery and choral chamber music in Colchester.

Photo/artwork, Sarah Crowley

If you feel the same as local theater performer Erin Evarts does, then you think there is a space in the local arts landscape for dinner theater.

Using the momentum created by a previous cabaret-style dinner and show in December at ArtsRiot on Pine Street in Burlington, Evarts has gathered a new cast of theater actors for Ladies Who Laugh: A Night Of Comic Cabaret.

New works in progress by black playwrights will be performed this weekend in the Upper Valley. The festival is sponsored by JAG productions, a relatively new black theater company that’s been drawing audiences across western New Hampshire and eastern Vermont.


Young Writers Project: 'Schizo'

Feb 2, 2018
Sara Young, 17, of Sheldon writes about how she wishes she had known a relative before he was diagnosed with schizophrenia.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Alexandra Contreras-Montesano, Burlington

I wish I had known you
before the darkness crept in,
before the voices whispered,
before the demons lurked in every corner.
Kind, compassionate, caring.
All manner of “C” sounds to describe you then.
They describe you now still,
only changed.
Only not.
It first manifested
ceaseless, complex, cacophonic.
Your diary read, “I can’t take this,”
and you hit your mother with a wrench,
or so you thought.
Meal time was spent on the porch, alone.
Inside the house, siblings laughed.

Our Art Hounds found an exhibit of visual art that explores all kinds of love, a chamber music performance interpreting a Greek classic and a play written by a famous stand-up comedian.

Courtesy / AP

Ski icon and filmmaker Warren Miller died last week at the age of 93. For decades, ski fans have watched his films each fall to inspire themselves for the upcoming ski season. 

Students at Dover Elementary School gathered in the library to discuss Kelly Barnhill's novel "The Girl Who Drank the Moon" and posed with the paper birds they made.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Students at Dover Elementary are trying their hands at making origami birds. Paper birds like these play an interesting role in Kelly Barnhill’s fantastical novel The Girl Who Drank the Moon. The birds in the book are magical, and they can be both helpful and vicious.

Young Writers Project: 'Teachers Say, Students Say'

Jan 26, 2018
Maddie Thibault is a 12-year-old seventh grader from Vermont.
Young Writers Project Photo Library, photo by Desiree Holmes

*NOTE: Some readers may find the language within the writing selection offensive*

Teachers say you're perfect.
They say don't listen to hate; but how do you not listen to hate when it surrounds you?

Burlington writer Jill M. Allen wanted to fill holes in the literary landscape with stories about Vermonters with disabilities whose handicaps represent 'only one aspect of who they are.'
Jill M. Allen/courtesy

Imagine you use a mobility device like a wheelchair. You pick up a book to read but no one depicted in the pages looks or moves like you. In fact, the characters are often written as people who are angry or depressed because of their disability. Enter, Burlington writer Jill M. Allen. She has penned a book of short stories where the characters live full lives and their disability is just one aspect of who they are.

VPR's arts-loving community of Art Hounds have found a folk music showcase in Montpelier, the kick-off to a 2018 performance season in Plainfield and dance auditions in South Burlington.

Screenshot from the trailer for 'The Post'

Apparently perceiving a conspiracy of Democrats, the press and liberal elites, the president is seething. Those around him have never seen him so angry.

Joel Ryan / AP

Searching for perspective on today’s national climate of reckless self-interest some historians find an apt comparison in another decade of unparalleled greed and corruption, the so-called “Roaring Twenties."

Young Writers Project: 'That Kind Of Writing'

Jan 19, 2018
In this piece, Nora Wootten, 13, of Cornwall, Vt., explains why she writes – not for a grade or to meet school standards, but to write about “what matters” and what people will listen to.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Kevin Huang, Burlington

I want
to write.
No, not like that,
silly –
not the little
dizzy
scribbles
that pass for
a grade.

My brother and sister-in-law have given the parents and me an Amazon Echo - or, as many know it, an “Alexa.” They love theirs and thought the more technologically “slow” of us should have one too.

You can take in two photography exhibits - one depicting birds, the other extreme nordic skiiers - and some community concerts plus a one-act play.

This image comes from John Killacky's short film, titled, 'Flow,' on which he collaborated with local filmmaker Art Bell.
Stephen Mease

John Killacky is Flynn Center for the Performing Arts' executive director, an artist and a filmmaker. Killacky is also someone who, in the 1990s AIDS pandemic, lost hundreds of friends. This month, a retrospective exhibit featuring eight of his short films - some of which depict how Killacky chose to honor those who died - will be on exhibit at Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington.

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