Arts & Culture

A panel of women behind the documentary "It's Criminal" takes questions from audience members. The panel included Dartmouth professors, students, formerly incarcerated women and the filmmaker.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

At the White River Indie Festival over the weekend audiences watched the local debut of a documentary that follows a Dartmouth College class working with incarcerated women from Sullivan County, New Hampshire.

Young Writers Project: 'Through Your Eyes'

Jun 2, 2017
Lila Taylor, a seventh-grade student from Charlotte, writes about her admiration for someone and how she wonders what that person thinks of her.
Lila Taylor, Courtesy

Through my eyes you are beautiful.
The person next to me might not see it.
They might not see the sparkle in your eyes,
the gentle wave of your hair.
But I do.

Artist Pat deGogorza, courtesy

Photos of famous musicians, storytellers sharing tales about aging and a singing group made up of people in recovery from strokes and other brain injuries are just a few of the arts events to take in this weekend and next.

Morgan Biele, a sophomore from Woodstock, writes an appreciation for her school backpack and all the treasures it holds.
Susan Reid, Courtesy

Like Dora I rely on my pack;
It has every little thing I lack.
The fact I forgot during my test
Is in that book next to the rest.

John Killacky, The Flynn Center For The Performing Arts, courtesy

Chelsea Lafayette is a Vermonter by way of New Orleans. Ten years ago, after attending college in Louisiana, she followed her now-spouse north. And on her first night in Burlington, the neon marquee of the iconic Flynn Theater ensured she'd never look back.

Deb Flanders

Marc Chagall’s career spanned almost 100 years and 3 continents. Considered the quintessential Jewish artist of the 20th century, Chagall was a master colorist, dreamer and story teller. And for a few more days – through June 11 – three hundred and forty of his works can be seen at the Musee des Beaux Arts in Montreal.

The basketball season’s now down to the seemingly endless NBA playoffs, after the nearly endless season. But I look back on another winter of Vermont basketball, the Barre Aud, other high school matchups, and college games at Middlebury, St. Michaels, Norwich, UVM. I’m a junkie.

Cathy Stanley-Erickson / Flickr

It's our annual spring gardening show! Most parts of Vermont still aren't technically past frost danger, but it's a great time to get into the garden and there are plenty of cold hardy vegetables you might already even be harvesting.

We're joined by gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi.

Artist Sarah Van Arsdale

When asked whether she falls into the camp that believes the catamount still roams Vermont's woods, author/illustrator Sarah Van Arsdale sees herself among those who fervently want to believe it's true.

Elizabeth Mandell

A busy holiday in the region with Open Studios Weekend and plenty of arts events this weekend and next.

Today we observe Memorial Day and I use the word “observe” with intention. We might easily say that we’re “celebrating” Memorial Day and, indeed, that may seem more appropriate. This is the start of summer, the first lifting of the dusty, gritty grill lid, the washing of the deck chairs, the crack of bat on ball, the first dipping of toes in chill mountain streams, the move outside for the duration of the season. After a Vermont winter, it’s certainly something to be celebrated.

For about an hour, I was one of 30 audience members sitting in a ring on the Main Stage of Burlington’s Flynn Center while four strong, agile and graceful women danced in and around us. It was a remarkable performance - one of four shows by Adele Myers and Dancers.

Screenshot by Sam Gale Rosen / Interactive map from VCGI

Maps have come a long way. We've gone from "here be dragons" on parchment scrolls to an age of satellites, plane-mounted lasers, and democratization - everyone can now be his or her own cartographer. We're diving deep into the latest on what maps are, what they might become, and what we can learn from them.

Courtesy, Julia Kitonis

When Julia Kitonis chose a final project for the NEXUS program at Champlain Valley Union High School in Hinesburg, the senior knew she wanted to focus on accessibility to the arts. And coupled with her own theater background and a revival of her favorite musical, Spring Awakening that included both hearing and non-hearing actors, the seed of an immense idea was born.

Courtesy, Ohavi Zedek Synagogue

Ballet Wolcott performs Snow White and a local playwright pens a work about the vibrant Little Jerusalem area in Burlington during the 1900s.

Artist Elizabeth Torak/Courtesy Helmholz Fine Art

Add a few of film screenings, a kids' pop-up theater or a performance of Eastern European music to your social calendar.

Courtesy, Susan Reid

There is fuzz on my sweater.
My house is cold.
The fridge lacks leftovers to find dinner among.
I'm fed up with screens.

In the darkened theater we followed an Afghan woman as she escaped her burning village with nine children, carrying a fifty-pound sack of flour on her head while trudging through deep mountain snows.

Weybridge Elementary School fourth-grader Juliette Hunsdorfer shows off a copy of 'The War That Saved My Life,' while sixth-grader Narges Anzali listens to another reader's comments about the book.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The War That Saved My Life, by author Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, is a World War II-era story about a girl and her brother who have a chance to escape their cruel childhood when London is evacuated during the war.

New England states are considering the idea of sticking with daylight saving time year 'round. Proposals to make the switch are being taken up by several legislatures, including Maine's.

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