Beth Pearce

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

As lawmakers look to defer again a politically difficult decision on how to pay for a $1 billion clean water initiative, advocates are ramping up pressure to adopt a financing plan before the 2017 legislative session adjourns.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

A plan to fund water-quality improvements by assessing a per-parcel fee on all property owners in Vermont is already drawing opposition in Montpelier.

Over 200 years ago, the Spitfire, a Revolutionary War-era gunship, sank to the bottom of Lake Champlain after being damaged during the Battle of Valcour Island. Now, researchers are proposing a plan to raise the ship, restore it and put it on display.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

If lawmakers go along with the recommendations outlined in a long-awaited report released late Sunday night, then property owners across Vermont will pick up much of the tab for a water-quality improvement initiative expected to cost almost $1 billion over the next 20 years.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

State Treasurer Beth Pearce is planning to work with lawmakers this year to set up a program to bring retirement savings plans to more Vermonters.

A study committee created by the Legislature will recommend that lawmakers create a public retirement program. The program would be designed for Vermont workers whose employers don’t offer them.

Over 200 years ago, the Spitfire, a Revolutionary War-era gunship, sank to the bottom of Lake Champlain after being damaged during the Battle of Valcour Island. Now, researchers are proposing a plan to raise the ship, restore it and put it on display.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

Next month, Vermont Treasurer Beth Pearce will unveil a much-anticipated legislative report that will tell lawmakers how to raise the $1.3 billion needed to clean up Lake Champlain and other polluted waterways. And Governor-elect Phil Scott may soon find himself at odds with Democrats — and environmental advocates — over how to come up with the money.

Photo Illustration by Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Should Vermont divest from fossil fuels? Will today’s state employees get the retirement benefits they’ve been promised? Your vote will help determine who’s in charge of answering those questions.

Next year, lawmakers will wrestle with one of the biggest financial challenges in state history, when they have to decide how to raise the estimated $1.3 billion needed to improve water quality across Vermont.

Photo Illustration by Emily Alfin Johnson / Photos by Meg Malone / VPR

This week and next, Vermont Edition is bringing you election debates for statewide offices.  On Wednesday, the leading candidates for treasurer meet in a live, face-to-face debate.

Courtesy of Jake Brennan

What do Flannery O'Connor, Vampires in the Lemon Grove, Ulysses and State Treasurer Beth Pearce have in common? They're all referenced on the new record from Burlington-based band Violet Ultraviolet.

Songwriter Jake Brennan spoke with VPR about the new album Pop City and the inspirations behind it.

Gov. Peter Shumlin joined with environmental advocates earlier this year in calling for the state pension fund to unload its stocks in coal companies and Exxon-Mobil. But it turns out that the $4 billion fund is still generating returns from companies related to the last big divestment battle.

Courtesy of Thomas Hanley / Middlebury Police Department

Sgt. Jason Covey sits at a conference table in the Middlebury Police Department offices. Displayed out in front of him are three guns. Each one has a little tag attached by a string, looped around the trigger like a price tag, with information about how the department acquired the gun.

Carlos Osorio / AP

State Treasurer Beth Pearce says she opposes a plan that calls for the divestment of fossil fuel companies from the state's pension funds.

iStock

Moody's, Fitch and Standard & Poor's have reaffirmed the bond ratings that give Vermont the best credit score among New England states. But Wall Street analysts say an aging demographic profile and unfunded pension and health care liabilities pose economic risks in the future.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

The Governor and the Legislature decide how the state spends its money, but it’s the treasurer’s job to oversee the funds in the state’s bank accounts. Treasurer Beth Pearce says the state employees pension fund has recovered well from the financial crisis, and that important changes have been made to the Teacher's Retirement System to make it more sustainable.

We'll ask Treasurer Beth Pearce about pensions, bond sales,  and what the state does with unclaimed financial property.