Books

Summer renovations at Brownell Library, in Essex Junction, have been pushed back several weeks due to manufacturing supply delays. However, library personnel anticipate new subflooring and carpeting will be installed on the main floor at some point this summer, and a plan to keep serving patrons is in place.

Sara Baker

Last year, Danielle O'Hallisey found herself amidst a coming-together of unrelated events, the result of which led to the composition of an exciting new work.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Students from Brattleboro, Killington and Williamstown traveled to the Vermont Statehouse on Friday to receive Vermont's first Letters About Literature awards. This is the 23rd year the Library of Congress has held the nationwide contest, but the first year Vermont has joined as a participating state.

University of Vermont students at this weekend's commencement ceremonies will hear from one of their own, an alum who went on to forge a world-renowned career as an author and journalist. Gail Sheehy graduated from UVM in 1958 and then moved to New York just as a second wave of feminism was changing the rules of the game in traditional reporting and writing.

Liz West / Flickr

Meet Jessamyn West, the radical librarian. She just got a big award from the Vermont Library Association for her role in the selection process for the next Librarian of Congress. She's behind one of the first librarian blogs, she's annoyed the FBI, and she's a crusader for keeping both sides of the digital divide in mind as we move further into the information age. Cory Doctorow of "Boing Boing" has called her an "internet folk hero."

Johnson State College

Jensen Beach's writing can simultaneously provoke readers' judgment while eliciting compassion. His stark, yet multiply-layered prose explores the deep uneasiness people feel, and communicates a complexity of emotions using an economy of words.

VPR's Mitch Wertlieb spoke with Jensen Beach, an assistant professor of writing and literature at Johnson State College, about his new collection of short stories called Swallowed By The Cold.

David Conrad

On a recent afternoon, I met Vermont poet Jean Connor near her home on the campus of Wake Robin in Shelburne. Seated at a round table in the center of the room, Connor had neat stacks of papers and her two books of poetry in front of her; she was poised and ready to talk about her work and writing practice.

Courtesy of Jake Brennan

What do Flannery O'Connor, Vampires in the Lemon Grove, Ulysses and State Treasurer Beth Pearce have in common? They're all referenced on the new record from Burlington-based band Violet Ultraviolet.

Songwriter Jake Brennan spoke with VPR about the new album Pop City and the inspirations behind it.

Amulet Books

More than 3,200 Vermont middle schoolers voted for this year’s Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award, and it was a tight race. But in the end El Deafo was a clear winner. El Deafo is the second graphic novel to win the award in its 60-year history. The first was Smile by Raina Telgemier in 2012. And El Deafo author and illustrator Cece Bell says that book inspired her to create El Deafo.

Kelly Fletcher / Landmark Trust

There's a new, live-action movie coming out of Rudyard Kipling's "The Jungle Book." That work - and some of Kipling's other famous works like "Captains Courageous" and the "Just So Stories" - were written right here in Vermont: at Naulakha, the author's Dummerston home.

mustafahacalaki / iStock.com

This week, the Cutler Memorial Library in Plainfield is honoring two longtime trustees. Jan Danzinger and Sandra Wells each served for 20 or more years on the library board.

Courtesy of Nancy Hogue

Author Steve Long was our guest recently to discuss his new book about a devastating storm in New England history. On September 21, 1938, a hurricane slammed into New England killing hundreds and causing long-lasting effects on the economy and the landscape itself.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Library time at the Marlboro School is something of an oasis in the midst of a hectic day. Students in this reading group are serving each other tea and cupcakes, and getting ready to settle in to their discussion of The One Safe Place.

Jeff Woodward

Through her practice as a life coach and her website, Mindful Connections, Marlboro author Nicole Birkholzer is in the business of helping people live in the moment. And as a life-long animal lover, horsewoman and pet owner, Birkholzer saw that our animal companions – who only live in the present – could be the best teachers to get us closer to that goal.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

When this group of students from Burlington's Hunt and Edmunds Middle Schools got together to discuss The Art of Secrets, some of them were meeting for the first time. So Edmunds librarian Carole Renca started them out with a matching game to allow the students to mingle. Some students had cards with the names of characters from The Art of Secrets, and others had cards with descriptions of the character.

Folger Shakespeare Library

In a quiet, darkened room at the Middlebury College Museum of Art, a big book, with gilt edges, sits open under the protection of a clear alarmed plexi-glass box.

Courtesy of Short Story America

In his latest book, "Greeves Passing: A Novel in Fugue," Vermont author Richard Hawley weaves together the stories of three members of the same family. John Greeve is the headmaster of Wells School, a private New England prep school. And Meg is his wife, diagnosed with terminal cancer at the beginning of the book. Their son, Brian Greeve, is a disaffected young adult who has cut ties while he's traveling abroad, "finding himself."

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The early life story of author and illustrator Cece Bell unfolds across the pages of El Deafo in comic book style panels. We first meet Cece as an energetic preschooler who loves to wear her poka-dotted bathing suit everywhere. Then we watch her get sick and lose her hearing as speech bubbles fade to blank.

Jonathan Mingle / Courtesy

When we hear about climate change in the media, the message tends to be of the gloom and doom variety. But there’s a message of hope to be found in a recent book about, of all things, soot.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Outside their classroom, seventh and eighth graders at Rutland Town School are bounce passing and showing off their basketball moves, including the move their latest read was named for – the crossover. When we asked them how they liked the book, they raved about the book. They’re not alone.

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