Books

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

British-born Brattleboro resident Denise "Jane" Ashworth has been defying expectations her whole life. She was a translator in World War II, she was among the first women to work the trails for the U.S. Forest Service — and now she's self-published her first children's book.

Neal Charnoff / VPR file

For people prone to sleepwalking, slumber is not necessarily the welcome respite it is for others. The condition lies at the heart of a new mystery thriller by Vermont author Chris Bohjalian.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Sixth-graders from the Vermont Commons School in South Burlington file into Pierson Library and head up a short set of stairs to a grand room: Shelburne's historic town hall. The class is here to discuss Shadows of Sherwood, the first book in the "Robyn Hoodlum Adventures" series. 

Vermont poet, playwright and author David Budbill died in September. But for the last decade of his life, Budbill was at work on a novel, which he completed before his death.

Lionsgate Premiere

In 1978, children's author Katherine Paterson published The Great Gilly Hopkins. The next year it won the National Book Award. This year Paterson worked with her two sons and an all-star cast to bring the story to film.

Triangle Square Books for Young Readers / Seven Stories Press

Two celebrated Vermont artists have come together to address a very delicate problem: how to help kids understand and cope with death, and grieving the loss of someone they love. Author Julia Alvarez and woodblock artist Sabra Field are collaborators on the new book Where Do They Go?

Marion Ettlinger

A Vermont author is following the success of her first book with a new collection of poetry. Elizabeth Powell’s new collection is called Willy Loman's Reckless Daughter or Living Truthfully Under Imaginary Circumstances.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There’s a unique opportunity for local actors happening in Greensboro. This week auditions are being held for a staged reading of a new Christmas play by two well-known children’s authors.

Bob Kinzel / VPR

Hundreds of people stood in line for hours in downtown Montpelier Tuesday for a chance to meet Sen. Bernie Sanders. The event was part of Sanders' promotional tour for his new book Our Revolution, which chronicles Sanders' political career and provides his road map for the Democratic Party to gain the support of millions of working people in the future.

Courtesy, Fay Webern

In the opening chapter of her new book, Montpelier author Fay Webern reveals to the reader, in frank language, the devastating origins of her given name. And throughout the rest of the book's 42 chapters, the 89-year-old writer conjures up a clear picture of her family life and the warm, creative, resourceful people who resided alongside them in the Utopian housing community known as Lavanburg in 1920's New York City's Lower East Side.

Geography, personal insecurity, and poverty are just some of the powerful forces that Angela Palm has struggled with and against in becoming a writer. That may be surprising to some, because Palm's memoir Riverine is a triumph of a book, named the winner of the 2015 Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize.

Courtesy of Henry Holt and Company

As the United States was fighting furiously to throw off the shackles of British oppression in the late 1700s, nearly a million people were enslaved in American colonies. That number would reach around four million by the 1860 census. So how did Washington, Jefferson and some of the other founding fathers justify the nation's freedom from England while denying it to enslaved people?

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

One long table dominates the open space in the center of the tiny, 150-year-old Peabody Library in Post Mills. Around that table, a group of Dorothy's List readers – ranging in age from 9 to 11 – are tying lengths of rope into knots. The knots are keeping their hands busy as they discuss the book Circus Mirandus.

Artist, Ellen Tumavicus

A writer and an illustrator from Brattleboro have written a new picture book aimed at kids that asks them to put aside fears of our differences and embrace them instead.

Steve Solberg

Early Sunday morning, Vermont lost one of its defining voices. Poet, playwright and musician David Budbill died at the age of 76.

Poet and University of Vermont professor Major Jackson was announced as the winner of this year's Vermont Book Award on Saturday night at a gala at the Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Courtesy

Once called the unofficial poet-laureate of the Northeast Kingdom, poet Leland Kinsey has died at the age of 66. 

DNY59 / iStock

Returning from the holiday weekend, we'll be again sharing two memorable Vermont Edition pieces from this spring – one dealing with coincidences and the other about recycling containers.

Book-lovers have the opportunity to mix and mingle with authors, poets and other readers at Brattleboro's The Lounge every Thursday night. 

Courtesy of Doubleday

Central to the campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders was a critique of the role of money in politics, especially large donations from wealthy individuals to help candidates who support their policies or principles.

Clearly, millions of people agree with Sanders and supported him, yet more and more money – including "dark money" from undisclosed donors – is pouring into politics in the hope of influencing elections.

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