Books

Simon & Schuster

Women are a larger part of the labor force than ever before in the U.S., but society is still not always kind to women who step out of the boundaries of what's considered acceptable. That's one reason Vermont author Megan Mayhew Bergman wrote her new book of short stories, Almost Famous Women.

Angela Evancie / VPR

The author of numerous works of fiction and essays, Salman Rushdie won the Booker Prize in 1981 for his novel Midnight's Children, and later that decade, became something of a story himself when his novel The Satanic Verses drew outrage from some Muslims around the world, and a call for his assassination issued in a Fatwa by Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini.

So it is also accurate to say that Rushdie knows a thing or two about the power of stories.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This month Dorothy's List visited the West Rutland School, where sixth graders have been reading a Golden Boy by Tara Sullivan. Golden Boy tells the story of an albino Tanzanian boy named Habo. Habo is forced to flee across his country, when a poacher tries to hunt him down. It's a difficult read that’s hard to categorize. It reads like historical fiction, but the real-life circumstances are both modern-day and horrifying.

Herb Swanson / swanpix.com

Vermont may be a small state, but it’s big with readers. In fact, it ranks third in the nation when it comes to the number of bookstores per capita. That’s keeping independent booksellers happy this shopping season.

Nati Harnik / AP

Most children's books are fun little bits of fiction conjured up to make children laugh. It's not often you'll find non-fiction children's books that also manage to delight young readers with their true tale.

Wind Ridge Books

The publishing world has changed dramatically since the introduction of the Gutenberg press. Companies like Amazon have shaken up the relationship between the reader and publisher, causing some in the publishing world to think it’s becoming a commodities market.


Green Writers Press / YouTube

A new collection of fiction offers a diverse perspective of the people and places that make Vermont what it is.

The anthology includes stories by well-known, award-winning authors such as Julia Alvarez, Wallace Stegner, Annie Proulx and Howard Frank Mosher, but it also mixes in stories from writers you may have never read, waiting to be discovered and enjoyed.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Courage Has No Color, by Vermont author Tanya Lee Stone, is the true story of the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion, which was created during World War II. The battalion was known as the Triple Nickels. The men who made up the Triple Nickels were the first African Americans to serve in the United States military as paratroopers.

Namelos Editions

Will Poole's Island, a new novel by Vermont writer Tim Weed, is a perfect fit for the Thanksgiving season. It's historical fiction set in the colonial era, and it tells the story of an English boy who becomes immersed in a native community.

Chooseco Publishing

Many readers fondly remember the childhood joy and suspense brought by the Choose Your Own Adventure books. This series allowed young readers to make choices throughout the book that changed the story slightly, finishing with one of up to 14 different endings.

Ramon Espinosa / AP File

This weekend in Burlington the Peace & Justice Center is holding an event to honor the Migrant Justice, a group that works with Vermont’s community of migrant farm workers, trying to get them access to transportation, health care, and safe working conditions.

Author and Vermonter Julia Alvarez will be at the Peace & Justice Center event reading from her newest short story.

Oxford University Press

Long before legislators in the Vermont Statehouse grappled with civil unions or same-sex marriage, two women in Weybridge lived together as a married couple for 44 years.

Charity Bryant and Sylvia Drake were together from 1807 through 1851. Charity & Sylvia: A Same Sex Marriage In Early America, by Rachel Hope Cleves, reveals the extraordinary marriage of these two women, and the ways in which their relationship impacted their community.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Salt is subtitled A Story of Friendship in a Time of War. The friendship is between two 12-year-old boys named James and Anikwa. The time of war is the War of 1812. British and American armies are preparing to collide at Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Bob Travis / Flickr Creative Commons

Middlebury College Professor Matthew Dickerson, along with David O’Hara, gets readers out of the classroom and into the great outdoors with the book Downstream: Reflections on Brook Trout, Fly Fishing, and the Waters of Appalachia. The book takes the fishermen to the waters of Maine, New York, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Tennessee and North Carolina.


Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Halloween is around the corner, but some comic fans dress up in costume year-round. And all manner of characters came out for the first annual Vermont Comic Con in Burlington this weekend. Folks dressed in elaborate costumes ranging from obscure comic characters to fairytale favorites.

For some, it’s a chance to be a hero – or a villain – for a day.  

Curtis Swafford won the “novice” category in the costume contest. He dressed as Edward Elric from “Fullmetal Alchemist,” a Japanese manga series.  

Courtesy

The writer Katherine Paterson is well known, and has been widely honored, for her fiction, with two National Book Awards to her credit, two Newbury Medals and a Newbury honor. Her best known works  include Bridge To Terabithia, The Great Gilly Hopkins, and Jacob Have I Loved. And her novel Day of the Pelican was chosen as the book to be read statewide in Vermont as part of the Vermont Reads project in 2010.

Hemera / Thinkstock

Any parent of young kids--or even older ones for that matter--struggles with the question of how much screen time kids should be exposed to in a given day or week. Experts say it should be limited, but what's the definition of "limited"? And how realistic is it in a 21st-century life populated by screens on every device from phones to tablets and computers, before we even get to TV's?

“St. Albans Invaded! Several Citizens Shot! Great Excitement Prevails!” Those were the headlines 150 years on Oct. 19, 1864.

What came to be known as the St. Albans Raid brought the Civil War, the great majority of which was fought in the south, to the northern hills of Vermont as confederate soldiers attacked and held St. Albans hostage. The details of the siege are told in a new book by author Michelle Arnoksy Sherburne, The St. Albans Raid: Confederate Attack on Vermont.

Helen Shepartz

Fans of Guilford author Michael Nethercott’s first novel, The Séance Society, will be happy to know that the so-called “odd couple” sleuths, Lee Plunkett and Mr. O’Nelligan, have returned to solve another crime.

Nethercott’s new novel, The Haunting Ballad, features Plunkett and O’Nelligan on the job in Greenwich Village in 1957. The folk singer Lorraine Cobble has fallen to her death from the roof of her apartment building. Did she jump, or was she pushed?

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This month we go to Grand Isle School, where fifth graders have been reading Better Nate Than Ever by Tim Federle. The book draws on Federle's own experience in musical theater and the classic middle school experience of feeling like an outcast.

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