Books

Namelos Editions

Will Poole's Island, a new novel by Vermont writer Tim Weed, is a perfect fit for the Thanksgiving season. It's historical fiction set in the colonial era, and it tells the story of an English boy who becomes immersed in a native community.

Chooseco Publishing

Many readers fondly remember the childhood joy and suspense brought by the Choose Your Own Adventure books. This series allowed young readers to make choices throughout the book that changed the story slightly, finishing with one of up to 14 different endings.

Ramon Espinosa / AP File

This weekend in Burlington the Peace & Justice Center is holding an event to honor the Migrant Justice, a group that works with Vermont’s community of migrant farm workers, trying to get them access to transportation, health care, and safe working conditions.

Author and Vermonter Julia Alvarez will be at the Peace & Justice Center event reading from her newest short story.

Oxford University Press

Long before legislators in the Vermont Statehouse grappled with civil unions or same-sex marriage, two women in Weybridge lived together as a married couple for 44 years.

Charity Bryant and Sylvia Drake were together from 1807 through 1851. Charity & Sylvia: A Same Sex Marriage In Early America, by Rachel Hope Cleves, reveals the extraordinary marriage of these two women, and the ways in which their relationship impacted their community.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Salt is subtitled A Story of Friendship in a Time of War. The friendship is between two 12-year-old boys named James and Anikwa. The time of war is the War of 1812. British and American armies are preparing to collide at Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Bob Travis / Flickr Creative Commons

Middlebury College Professor Matthew Dickerson, along with David O’Hara, gets readers out of the classroom and into the great outdoors with the book Downstream: Reflections on Brook Trout, Fly Fishing, and the Waters of Appalachia. The book takes the fishermen to the waters of Maine, New York, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Tennessee and North Carolina.


Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Halloween is around the corner, but some comic fans dress up in costume year-round. And all manner of characters came out for the first annual Vermont Comic Con in Burlington this weekend. Folks dressed in elaborate costumes ranging from obscure comic characters to fairytale favorites.

For some, it’s a chance to be a hero – or a villain – for a day.  

Curtis Swafford won the “novice” category in the costume contest. He dressed as Edward Elric from “Fullmetal Alchemist,” a Japanese manga series.  

Courtesy

The writer Katherine Paterson is well known, and has been widely honored, for her fiction, with two National Book Awards to her credit, two Newbury Medals and a Newbury honor. Her best known works  include Bridge To Terabithia, The Great Gilly Hopkins, and Jacob Have I Loved. And her novel Day of the Pelican was chosen as the book to be read statewide in Vermont as part of the Vermont Reads project in 2010.

Hemera / Thinkstock

Any parent of young kids--or even older ones for that matter--struggles with the question of how much screen time kids should be exposed to in a given day or week. Experts say it should be limited, but what's the definition of "limited"? And how realistic is it in a 21st-century life populated by screens on every device from phones to tablets and computers, before we even get to TV's?

“St. Albans Invaded! Several Citizens Shot! Great Excitement Prevails!” Those were the headlines 150 years on Oct. 19, 1864.

What came to be known as the St. Albans Raid brought the Civil War, the great majority of which was fought in the south, to the northern hills of Vermont as confederate soldiers attacked and held St. Albans hostage. The details of the siege are told in a new book by author Michelle Arnoksy Sherburne, The St. Albans Raid: Confederate Attack on Vermont.

Helen Shepartz

Fans of Guilford author Michael Nethercott’s first novel, The Séance Society, will be happy to know that the so-called “odd couple” sleuths, Lee Plunkett and Mr. O’Nelligan, have returned to solve another crime.

Nethercott’s new novel, The Haunting Ballad, features Plunkett and O’Nelligan on the job in Greenwich Village in 1957. The folk singer Lorraine Cobble has fallen to her death from the roof of her apartment building. Did she jump, or was she pushed?

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This month we go to Grand Isle School, where fifth graders have been reading Better Nate Than Ever by Tim Federle. The book draws on Federle's own experience in musical theater and the classic middle school experience of feeling like an outcast.

Cancer has the power to transform the lives of those who are struck by it, as well as the lives of close family members. That’s the theme of the new novel by Burlington writer David Huddle. The Faulkes Chronicle focuses on Karen Faulkes, the matriarch of a large family – very large, with more than two dozen kids – and how the family’s relationships are tested by her cancer. 

Angela Evancie / VPR

Fall is here and for many Vermonters that means wrapping up the gardening season. But others are thinking about getting their hands in the soil, and planning ahead for next year's garden.

Author, gardener and VPR commentator Ron Krupp has a new book out where he chronicles the full year of a garden. It’s called The Woodchuck Returns To Gardening.  He views it as a companion to his first book, The Woodchuck’s Guide To Gardening.

Going back to your childhood home to visit your parents can be awkward at the best of times. Especially if your 38-year-old brother still lives at home and your mother is a hoarder … But sometimes going back home again is exactly what you need to do to move forward with your life. That’s the theme of Vermont author Sarah Healy’s new novel, House of Wonder. Sarah Healy spoke with Vermont Edition about the book. Healy starts off reading a passage.

Amy Noyes / VPR

Today marks the beginning of season two of Dorothy's List, Vermont Edition's series about the books that are nominated for the Dorothy Canfield Fisher children's book award. Each month this school year, this series will bring you a story about one of the books on the list of award nominees. The winning book is selected in the spring by the Vermont middle grade students who read and discuss these books.

Martha E. Diebold Real Estate

Author J.D. Salinger, the enigmatic author of The Catcher in the Rye, was secretive and reclusive. And his neighbors in Cornish, New Hampshire guarded his privacy fiercely. So, just about anything that gives us a peak into his world is of interest to those who loved his work. Recently, a home he once owned in Cornish, New Hampshire was put up for sale by its current owner.

Courtesy Diana Whitney

Brattleboro resident Diana Whitney's debut collection of poetry, Wanting It, is gathering praise from some of the state’s top poets. Vermont Poet Laureate Sydnea Lea calls it a “brilliant book.” Major Jackson refers to the poems in this collection as “ancient secrets.”

Whitney says the title of the book does not refer to one specific thing.

“It’s the wanting it that’s beautiful, more so than the having,” she says. “If you get what you want, then you don’t get that tremulous longing.”

Charlotte Albright / VPR

For many of us, summer is a time to kick back with a good book.  And in some neighborhoods, finding something new to read is as easy as strolling down the street. Little free libraries have been sprouting all over the world—including Vermont. Some are no bigger than a bird house. Others are as large as a phone booth. You leave a book, and take one—no card necessary.

Ramon Espinosa / AP File

Writer and Vermont resident Julia Alvarez captured critical acclaim with her novels How the García Girls Lost Their Accents and In the Time of the Butterflies. Now, she’s about to receive the National Medal of Arts in a White House ceremony on Monday. Alvarez joins us to discuss her work.

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