Brett Kavanaugh

Judge Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court by the Senate on Saturday. We want to hear your reaction.
Tom Williams / AP

On Saturday, after weeks of division and fury on Capitol Hill and across the country, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh was narrowly confirmed by the Senate. Beyond the politics, Americans have been debating multiple sexual assault allegations against the nominee and the apparent breakdown of norms on both sides of the process. Now, we want to hear what you think.

Updated at 11:31 p.m. ET

A sharply divided Senate — reflecting a deeply divided nation — voted almost entirely along party lines Saturday afternoon to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A little more than two hours later, Kavauangh was sworn in during a private ceremony as protesters stood on the court's steps.

Watch: Kavanaugh Confirmed To Supreme Court

Oct 6, 2018
 Judge Brett Kavanaugh, pictured here during his confirmation hearing on Sept. 4, with a variety of lights in the background.
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

The U.S. Senate held its final vote Saturday on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A profile headshot of Brett Kavanaugh on a black background.
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Update 11:11 a.m. This morning the U.S. Senate held a cloture vote to close debate regarding U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, which advanced on a vote of 51-49.

Updated at 8:41 p.m. ET

Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court cleared a key procedural hurdle in the Senate on Friday, and his confirmation now seems all but certain, after a key swing vote, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, declared her support in a speech on the Senate floor.

Moments after Collins completed her remarks, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., announced in a statement that he too will support the nomination when it comes up for a final vote.

That final vote is expected as soon as Saturday.

Updated at 7:51 a.m. ET on Thursday

The FBI's highly anticipated supplemental background check on Brett Kavanaugh was sent to the White House and Capitol Hill overnight, with senators set to review the report on Thursday in the final chapter of what has become a deeply acrimonious confirmation battle.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced the planned arrival of the report on Wednesday night and said all senators would get a chance to review it ahead of the next procedural milestones in the chamber.

Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee seated in a semi-circle in the hearing room.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

The Senate Committee on the Judiciary voted the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court out of committee early Friday afternoon.

Sen. Patrick Leahy and Sen. Amy Klobuchar standing, conversing with a flag behind them.
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

As the senior Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, Sen. Patrick Leahy plays a key role in the panel's review of allegations — and Leahy said he believes the allegations of sexual assault brought against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are true.

The sign outside a wood door that reads Committee on the Judiciary: This room is equipped with an assistive listening system. Please silence all electronic devices before entering. SD 226
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will be back before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday, as will Christine Blasey Ford, who alleges Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in the 1980s. Kavanaugh denies the allegations.

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Brett Kavanaugh.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Following the release of a sworn affidavit containing new sexual misconduct allegations against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Sen. Patrick Leahy and his fellow Judiciary Committee Democrats are calling on President Donald Trump to either withdraw Kavanaugh's nomination or launch an FBI investigation into the allegations of misconduct and assault.

After allegations of sexual assault have arisen against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh, his path to approval has gotten murky.
Jacquelyn Martin / AP FILE

The recent confirmation hearings for U.S. Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh have been controversial. And now the Senate Judiciary Committee — of which Sen. Patrick Leahy is the seniormost member — is trying to decide how to review allegations of sexual assualt that have been brought against Kavanaugh by professor Christine Blasey Ford.

Sen. Patrick Leahy says GOP leaders are blocking the release of key information concerning allegations of sexual assault brought against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh
Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

Sen. Patrick Leahy is accusing Senate Republican leaders of trying to block an investigation into the facts around allegations of sexual assault that have been brought against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

A profile headshot of Brett Kavanaugh on a black background.
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

All three members of Vermont's congressional delegation are calling for a full investigation into a sexual assault allegation brought against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh before the U.S. Senate votes on his nomination.

Senate Democrats threatened to sue the National Archives to obtain documents from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's career as a White House official during President George W. Bush's administration.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., told reporters Thursday that Democrats will file a lawsuit if the National Archives does not respond to their Freedom of Information Act request. The suit is a last-ditch effort to obtain the documents ahead of confirmation hearings set begin Sept. 4.

Sen. Patrick Leahy is the senior member of two Senate committees that are investigating possible ties between the Trump campaign and Russian officials
Susan Walsh / AP File

Sen. Patrick Leahy says the U.S. Senate needs to review the full paper trail involving Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

Updated at 9:28 p.m. ET

President Trump has chosen Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. If confirmed, Trump's choice would solidify the high court's conservative majority and continue the president's push to shift the federal bench to the right.

Trump announced his choice with a prime-time address from the White House East Room.