Burlington College

John Locher / AP

Even after bowing out of the presidential race last year, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has continued to crisscross the country, marshaling his support for progressive causes and candidates. But as his popularity remains strong, Sanders is also answering allegations related to his wife's tenure as president of now-defunct Burlington College.

A federal investigation of Jane Sanders is quickly becoming a political problem for her husband, Sen. Bernie Sanders. Officials are looking into whether Jane Sanders lied on a loan application when she was president of Burlington College, a small liberal arts school along the shore of Lake Champlain in Vermont.

Questions about Jane Sanders' time at the college are putting Bernie Sanders on the defensive at a time when national speaking tours and regular appearances on cable talk shows have some of his supporters predicting a 2020 presidential run.

Jane Sanders, right, left Burlington College in 2011. When her husband, Sen. Bernie Sanders, was running for president in 2016, a Republican party official called for an investigation into Jane Sanders' actions as president of the college.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

The federal investigation into a financing deal orchestrated by Jane Sanders when she was president of Burlington College has become a political liability in Washington, D.C. for her husband, Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

News of a federal investigation into a land deal by Jane O'Meara Sanders has brought new attention to unanswered questions surrounding an unsolved burglary at Burlington College shortly after it closed in May of 2016.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

The FBI is investigating a 2010 real estate deal that Jane O’Meara Sanders orchestrated as president of Burlington College, according to two former Burlington College officials.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

Dr. Carol A. Moore, the former president of Burlington College, has spoken out about the college's closure earlier this year in a letter to the editor of the Chronicle of Higher Education.

In the letter, titled "What Really Happened at Burlington College," Moore blames the school's financial trouble on former board members and a large land purchase authorized when Jane Sanders was president of Burlington College.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

When Burlington College closed last month, students got the impression that the transition to another college would be smooth, and their tuition might be the same. They’re now finding it's more complicated than that.

Vermont Republican Party Vice Chairman Brady Toensing called on Sen. Bernie Sanders this week to release documents related to the senator’s involvement in a financing deal his wife secured for Burlington College while she was president of the alternative liberal arts college.

courtesy

Like a lot of my fellow alumni, I’m saddened, but not really shocked by the news that Burlington College would be closing. Everyone is crushed.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Dr. Carol Moore, the president of Burlington College, spoke with VPR Wednesday about what she called "not a pleasant topic": the closure of the college, the contributing factors and what's next for BC students.

Jane Sanders, wife of U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, has hired lawyers as an investigation continues into her role in a land deal when she was president of Burlington College.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

The imminent closure of Burlington College next week is getting national attention thanks to the school’s former president and the presidential campaign.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

After years of financial troubles, Burlington College, a small alternative college in the northern end of the city, is closing its academic programs at the end of the month.

School officials announced Monday that after People's United Bank refused to renew a line of credit to the college, they had no choice but to close it.

Andrew Harnik / AP

The vice-chairman of the Vermont Republican Party says Bernie Sanders’ wife has exacted a severe financial toll on the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington. But the bishop who oversees the Catholic Church in Vermont says the accusation is without merit.

Courtesy / City of Burlington

The City of Burlington released a draft agreement Thursday to put a housing development on 27 acres of land that Burlington College sold to developer Eric Farrell in an effort to reduce debt.

Planning is underway for a controversial land deal that will develop a parcel of open space in Burlington that used to be owned by Burlington College.

Molly Walsh has been following that story for Seven Days and she joined VPR's Mitch Wertlieb for our Friday Regional Report.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

What should be done with the 27 acres on Lake Champlain that used to belong to Burlington College? The developer that now owns the land is asking for the public's opinion on that question. The first opportunities to participate take place on Tuesday.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Burlington College has spent much of the past year in a state of existential crisis, but after a major land sale was executed by interim president Mike Smith, the small school’s new president says she’s confident in the future.

Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger has weighed in in favor of partial development of the 25-acre plot of land Burlington College is selling in order to improve its troubled finances.

Burlington College's Board of Trustees has approved a deal to sell 25 acres of its lakefront land to Burlington developer Eric Farrell in order to reduce the college's debt burden, school officials announced Thursday.

Under the deal, Farrell is set to pay about $4 million to the Catholic Diocese - money the college currently owes the diocese, which sold the land to the college in 2010. Farrell will also pay $3.5 million to the college so it can pay down other debt; namely People's United Bank, which holds about $6.1 million of the college's debt.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

Burlington College is trying to sell off some land to get out of a bad financial situation, and they want to give conservation groups a chance to buy the land. Those groups say it's unlikely they'll be able to compete with the millions a local developer has agreed to pay for the property.

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