Campaign 2014

Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Thousands of supporters gathered at Burlington's waterfront this week to cheer on Sen. Bernie Sanders as he officially kicked off his presidential campaign, but not everyone is taking the bid as seriously.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Months of waiting are over. A joint assembly of Vermont's House and Senate made it official yesterday: Gov. Peter Shumlin gained a third two-year term with a vote total of 110 to 69 over Republican challenger Scott Milne.
 

Angela Evancie / VPR

Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Milne on Monday held his first press conference last month’s election. And while he may not have gotten as many votes as incumbent Democrat Peter Shumlin, Milne is still hoping he’ll be Vermont’s next governor.

With a record low voter turnout rate in the 2014 general election and a weird (and ongoing) finish to the race for governor, there's plenty to catch up on.

more milne!
Angela Evancie / VPR

The statewide canvassing committee met Wednesday to certify November's election results, and the tally shows that Democratic Governor Peter Shumlin did receive the most votes, over 2,400 more than Republican challenger Scott Milne.
 


Bob Kinzel / VPR

About an hour after the state canvassing committee certified Gov. Peter Shumlin’s roughly 2,400 vote victory over Scott Milne, Milne said he would not seek a recount.

Since the margin of victory was under 2 percent, Milne was legally entitled to a recount. But he says it would have cost the state as much as $60,000 and he doubted that the outcome would have changed.

Bob Kinzel / VPR/file

At 10 a.m. this morning, Secretary of State Jim Condos will sit down at a large conference room table in his office with representatives of Vermont’s four political parties.

This five-person group is known as the state Canvassing Committee and its job is to review the statewide election results.

If they find the results to be accurate, they’ll recommend that lawmakers accept them in January.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Because no gubernatorial candidate received 50 percent of the vote, lawmakers will elect the next governor in a secret ballot on the first day of 2015 session.

Republican candidate Scott Milne says he might reach out to lawmakers to try to overturn Democrat Peter Shumlin’s narrow victory. But former GOP governor Jim Douglas thinks it’s a mistake for Milne to take this action.

According to unofficial statewide results, incumbent governor Peter Shumlin defeated Scott Milne by roughly 2,400 votes.

Gov. Peter Shumlin had previously vowed to make Vermont the first state in the country to adopt a single-payer health care system. But after a near miss in last week’s election, the Democrat might to be backing away from that pledge.

The promise of single-payer health care has been part and parcel of Shumlin’s political identity. From the kickoff of his inaugural gubernatorial campaign in 2010, to the launch of his latest reelection bid this fall, his rhetoric has been unwavering.

Angela Evancie / VPR File Photo

The election may be over. But the campaign for governor continues.

While the time for convincing voters has passed, Republican Scott Milne and his supporters are taking his case to legislators.

Marylou Wells is done with Gov. Peter Shumlin. And she’d like the Legislature to dispatch with him on her behalf.

“I feel Peter Shumlin was disconnected from the real world and what is going on in our society, and the everyday struggles of the people,” she said.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

The Vermont governor’s race upended expectations Tuesday with results that show weakened support for Governor Peter Shumlin. The next afternoon, he told reporters in a news conference, "I recognize that I have work to do to regain the confidence of many Vermonters."

Shumlin was our guest for a live, hour-long interview in which he responded to callers who expressed frustrations on a number of issues that affected their votes.

Broadcast live on Fri., Nov.7 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

More than 2,500 people have signed an online petition calling on the state Legislature to select Republican Scott Milne as governor of Vermont despite that fact that unofficial results show he received about 2,000 fewer votes than Gov. Peter Shumlin.

Toby Talbot / AP

If you’re one of the Vermont voters who turned out in this year’s elections  - the Associated Press reports Tuesday’s turnout was the lowest in decades -  you might be surprised to find out that  your vote for governor is not the final action.

Angela Evancie / VPR File Photo

The final vote count from Tuesday’s election left Republican Scott Milne more than 2,000 votes shy of Gov. Peter Shumlin.

But Milne said Thursday that he’s not ready to concede. He’s considering asking for a recount. And – because the vote has to go to the Legislature – he’s looking at lobbying lawmakers for their support.

Milne said before the election that he was running a boring campaign – a tactic he wasn’t apologetic about.

While many Democratic incumbent senators and governors across the country weren’t able to keep their seats, Democratic incumbents in New Hampshire largely survived. Governor Maggie Hassan, Senator Jeanne Shaheen and Congresswoman Annie Kuster all held off their GOP challengers.
 


Taylor Dobbs / VPR


After Tuesday’s election, Republicans will pick up at least nine seats in the Vermont House, and two seats in the Senate. And leaders of the GOP say the gains will give them greater influence over the legislative debate in Montpelier.

Of all the election night surprises on Tuesday – and there were lots of them – perhaps none will reverberate in the Legislature next year as much as the shocker that came out of a four-town district in Addison County farm country.  

Angela Evancie / VPR File

Based on Tuesday’s election results, the Republicans will have a clear majority when the new Congressional session convenes in January. The change will have a direct impact on Democrat Patrick Leahy and Independent Bernie Sanders because both senators will lose their chairmanships of several key committees.

Retired Middlebury College political science professor Eric Davis says Leahy will no longer be able to set the agenda for the Senate Judiciary committee.

Transcript And Audio: Shumlin's Victory Speech

Nov 5, 2014
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Below is the full transcript of Gov. Peter Shumlin's remarks in City Hall Park in Burlington on the afternoon of Wednesday, Nov. 5.

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