Christine Hallquist

Christine Hallquist, the Democratic candidate for governor, outlines parts of her education platform in Burlington on Wednesday, stading behind a Christine for Vermont sign outside.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Christine Hallquist outlined some aspects of her education platform on Wednesday in Burlington, saying she supports a change in how public schools are funded.

Blue-green algae blooms, photographed in the summer of 2014 in Lake Champlain.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR FILE

Both of Vermont's major party gubernatorial candidates say they support a long-term plan to clean up Lake Champlain and other waterways in Vermont, but neither candidate is offering a plan to pay for it.

A blue hospital monitoring line that turns into a dollar symbol.
hh5800 / iStock

Vermont's two major party candidates for governor — Republican incumbent Gov. Phil Scott and Democratic nominee Christine Hallquist — have sharp disagreements on the path Vermont should take to make health care more affordable in the short term. Yet the two candidates view the long-term solution in a similar way.

A row of three empty chairs set up at a table with microphones for a panel.
onurdongel / iStock

Vermont branches of the NAACP will hold their first-ever candidate forums in Rutland and Brattleboro this weekend, but most of the major-party nominees invited to participate have chosen not to attend.

An illustration of a hand holding bills of money.
MHJ / iStock

In recent election cycles, super PACs have sought to influence electoral contests from the governor on down in Vermont — and 2018 is proving to be no exception.

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Christine Hallquist speaks at a podium in Montpelier during a news conference.
Wilson Ring / Associated Press File

Party Chair Anthony Pollina says the Progressives want to see how Democratic gubernatorial candidate Christine Hallquist addresses some of the top issues facing the state during the next few weeks before they decide if they want to formally endorse her campaign.

The campaign of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Christine Hallquist says getting the endorsement of the Progressive Party is a key part of their strategy to win the election
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

Democratic candidate for governor Christine Hallquist is receiving threats of violence after her historic victory in last week’s primary.

Democratic candidate for governor Christine Hallquist introduces herself to a prospective voter in Barre last month.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Many Vermonters say Christine Hallquist’s victory in the Democratic gubernatorial primary is already building visibility for the transgender community.

Christine Hallquist embraces a supporter at her election night party in Burlington
Charles Krupa / Associated Press

For the first time in history, an openly transgender woman is a major party candidate for governor: Vermont voters chose former utility executive Christine Hallquist as the Democratic nominee for governor in the primary election.

The campaign of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Christine Hallquist says getting the endorsement of the Progressive Party is a key part of their strategy to win the election
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

A midsummer primary in one of the smallest states in the country took on historic national significance Tuesday night when Christine Hallquist became the first openly transgender candidate in U.S. history to win a major party gubernatorial nomination.

Clockwise from top left: James Ehlers, Christine Hallquist, Brenda Siegel and Ethan Sonneborn
Clockwise from top left: Peter Hirschfeld, VPR; courtesy of Hallquist campaign; courtesy of Siegel campaign; courtesy of Sonneborn campaign

Vermont Edition continues our series of live debates with candidates for selected statewide and federal office with the Democratic candidates for governor: James Ehlers, Christine Hallquist, Brenda Siegel and Ethan Sonneborn.

Christine Hallquist campaigns at a parade in downtown Barre last month. Hallquist, a former utility executive, says she'll bring a new style of leadership to the governor's office.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

When Christine Hallquist took over as CEO of the Vermont Electric Cooperative in 2005, the member-owned utility was by all accounts in choppy financial waters.

The Vermont Statehouse.
DenisTangneyJr. / iStock

The state’s primary elections are about three weeks away, but many Vermonters are not yet tuned into statewide politics, according to the new VPR - Vermont PBS Poll. However, they are concerned about pocketbook issues here in Vermont, such as the economy and taxes.

Christine Hallquist is running for the Democratic nomination for governor.
courtesy of Christine For Vermont

Christine Hallquist is the former CEO of Vermont Electric Cooperative. She's running for the Democratic nomination for governor, and will be the first openly transgender gubernatorial candidate on a major party primary ballot. We're talking to Hallquist as part of our series of interviews with statewide and federal candidates.

At his campaign launch in Barre in May, Democrat James Ehlers touted his policy agenda as the most progressive of the candidates seeking the governor's seat in 2018.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Standing before a crowd of about 50 supporters in Barre Tuesday evening, Democrat James Ehlers formally launched his bid for governor.  

According to campaign finance disclosures, Republican Gov. Phil Scott has raised more than twice as much money toward his 2018 reelection bid than any of the other four candidates challenging him for the office.
Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / The Times Argus

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott, a first-term Republican, has raised more than $120,000 toward his reelection campaign, according to the first campaign finance disclosures since last July.

Vermont's gubernatorial race is beginning to take shape.
Angela Evancie / VPR

There's a big election on the horizon in Vermont. Parties will choose their candidates for Governor in an August primary, with the general election in November. It's still early, but the race is starting to take shape.

courtesy, Brenda Patoine; courtesy, Christine for Vermont

Two candidates vying for the Democratic nomination for governor are carving out some early distinctions in their approaches to campaign finance, and fiscal oversight of state government.