Climate Change

Paul Costello, left, and Peter Walke, are co-chairs of the governor's Vermont Climate Action Commission, which met for the first time Tuesday. They say Vermont can use emissions-reduction initiatives to advance the state economy.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott’s newly minted Climate Action Commission held its first meeting Tuesday, and while past Vermont governors have also convened special panels to study the issue, commission members insist this latest one will deliver results.

Scientists say storms like this one in Waitsfield in 2010 are dumping more rain on the Northeast
Toby Talbot / AP

The draft National Climate Report both refines and underscores the impact of human activity on our climate. We're focusing in on the effects in Vermont and the Northeast.

Gov. Phil Scott and Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker are calling on the federal government to continue its efforts to address climate change.

Just a few days ago, a black vulture appeared above Walpole, New Hampshire, thirty-seven years after I confirmed the first turkey vulture nest in northern New England.

Two weeks after announcing significant cuts in funding for climate programs across the federal government, the Trump Administration released an executive order to roll back Obama Era climate policies.

According to poll data published recently by The New York Times, Vermonters worry and talk about climate change more than the rest of the country. The Times even published a series of maps showing how people in different regions view climate change.

Joshua Brown / UVM

That map that was hung at the front of your grade school classroom included one large land mass close to Canada and the United States that went virtually ignored. There it was to the north and the east and covered with ice. Yes, Greenland.

e_chaya / Flickr

New England governors and eastern Canadian premiers last week signed a resolution on climate change. 

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A University of Vermont research effort got a $20 million boost this year to fund studies on how to make watersheds more resilient to extreme weather events, officials announced Monday.

iStock

It seems like real winter may have finally arrived in Vermont. But what about the long-term forecast? Not the prospects for the weekend, but what the state's climate is going to look like years, decades, or even centuries down the line. We're looking at what a rapidly changing climate is going to mean for our particular neck of the woods. 

Leaders from around the world are converging on Paris for the 2015 U.N. Climate Change Conference. The two-week event is designed to allow countries the chance to come to an agreement on stifling climate change.

NPR's Ari Shapiro hosts a 1-hour special, with the help of NPR reporters, as well as experts from science, government, and business, to explain what's at stake and how it may — or may not — change the world's energy economy.

Toby Talbot / AP/file

A Brattleboro nonprofit that promotes sustainable building design says green buildings should be able to prove that they can stand up to natural disasters, especially those associated with climate change.

TONY TALBOT / AP

The Vermont Economic Resiliency Initiative has released their final report. Over the last two years, multiple agencies have been working together to look at how individual towns can think about the economic impacts of flood damage, and the value of mitigating it.

Climate change and human activity may be leading to a new wave of extinction.

Vermont Edition spoke to Elizabeth Kolbert, staff writer for The New Yorker, about the her latest book, "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History."

On historic mass extinctions

"The idea is that there have been these moments [that] are not spaced in any way for whatever reason, and the reasons vary, you get a very large number of species going extinct, in a geological sense, more or less at the same time," says Kolbert.

Vermont Council on Rural Development

The public is invited to a panel discussion on Wednesday evening at Rutland’s Paramount Theatre to brainstorm ways to turn the challenges of climate change into economic opportunities.

Toby Talbot / AP/file

This month marks four years since Tropical Storm Irene hit Vermont. In the aftermath, President Barack Obama vowed the Federal Emergency Management Agency would be there to help with recovery. But an investigation by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting and Al Jazeera America found FEMA hasn't exactly been prepared for the new normal of climate change. 

Toby Talbot / AP file

Businesses and technology that have sprouted up in response to climate change tend to place more emphasis on saving the planet than a return on investment. But in order to attract mainstream capital to these emerging companies, an innovative and profitable business model must be in place.

Ariel Schalit / AP

In 2007, the CNA Military Advisory Board issued a report calling climate change a “threat multiplier.” Seven years later, an update to the report included more urgent language, calling climate change a “catalyst for conflict.”

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Much of the rhetoric around climate change centers on the world today's children will inherit, but this week at UVM those kids started taking things into their own hands.

In Burlington Friday, 200 high school students from across Vermont gathered at the University of Vermont for a Youth Climate Summit. 

The students were tasked with forming a climate action plan for their own schools.

And the UVM faculty and students who put it on weren't toning it down and giving the high schoolers the "climate change junior" speech.

Sage Van Wing / Flickr

Among scientists, there is little debate any longer about whether human activity contributes to climate change. However, in politics, and on TV, it is still a matter of debate. So how do the physicists, engineers, and climatologists who do work in this field engage with the public debate?

We talk to Mary Albert, professor of Engineering at Dartmouth and executive director of the U.S. Ice Drilling Program Office, and Jennie Stephens, Professor of Sustainability Science and Policy at the University of Vermont. 

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