Climate Change

Some of the world's top climate scientists have concluded that global warming is likely to reach dangerous levels unless new technologies are developed to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says pledges from the world's governments to reduce greenhouse gases, made in Paris in 2015, aren't enough to keep global warming from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees F) above pre-industrial temperatures.

Al Gore stands on a stage with a sign that says Global Climate Action Summit in the background.
Eric Risberg / Associated Press

The Global Climate Action Summit was held earlier this month in San Francisco. While it may seem counterintuitive for that conference to be in a major American city when the United States has pulled out of the Paris climate accord, the activists who were there see an opportunity for the U.S. to still be a leader in fighting the effects of climate change.

John Locher / Associated Press

Seems like we’ve barely reacted to one wave of bad news these days when the next one breaks over us – reminding me of the '60's musical and film Stop the world I want to get off!

Paul Costello, left, and Peter Walke, are co-chairs of the governor's Vermont Climate Action Commission, which met for the first time Tuesday. They say Vermont can use emissions-reduction initiatives to advance the state economy.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

A report out Tuesday recommended ways the state of Vermont can reduce greenhouse gas emissions while also encouraging economic growth.

John Dillon / VPR

A Nature Conservancy project in northern Vermont will store carbon to meet California’s greenhouse gas reduction goals. The group says proceeds from the sale of these “carbon credits” will pay for future land protection projects.

Climate researchers say a changing climate could mean, among other changes, more extremes of heat and cold for Vermont.
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Vermont's climate is already changing, and experts say that could mean rising temperatures, wetter weather and more extremes for both heat and cold. But are there also opportunities to be seized as those changes unfold? 

LawrenceSawyer / iStock

It's been a cold winter so far, so it might be harder to conjure up images of milder winters marked by more rain than snow, but a new report released by the USDA Forest Service says those kinds of winters are very much in our future due to climate change.

And a number of very important species of trees vital to the region's health are going to be threatened as a result.

Creative Commons / Pexels

powerful wind storm raked Vermont a week ago, reminding many just how vulnerable the state's electric grid can be to severe weather. As climate change models forecast more unpredictable weather in the future, are Vermont utilities ready for the challenges of climate change?

Paul Costello, left, and Peter Walke, are co-chairs of the governor's Vermont Climate Action Commission, which met for the first time Tuesday. They say Vermont can use emissions-reduction initiatives to advance the state economy.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott’s newly minted Climate Action Commission held its first meeting Tuesday, and while past Vermont governors have also convened special panels to study the issue, commission members insist this latest one will deliver results.

Scientists say storms like this one in Waitsfield in 2010 are dumping more rain on the Northeast
Toby Talbot / AP

The draft National Climate Report both refines and underscores the impact of human activity on our climate. We're focusing in on the effects in Vermont and the Northeast.

Gov. Phil Scott and Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker are calling on the federal government to continue its efforts to address climate change.

Just a few days ago, a black vulture appeared above Walpole, New Hampshire, thirty-seven years after I confirmed the first turkey vulture nest in northern New England.

Two weeks after announcing significant cuts in funding for climate programs across the federal government, the Trump Administration released an executive order to roll back Obama Era climate policies.

According to poll data published recently by The New York Times, Vermonters worry and talk about climate change more than the rest of the country. The Times even published a series of maps showing how people in different regions view climate change.

Joshua Brown / UVM

That map that was hung at the front of your grade school classroom included one large land mass close to Canada and the United States that went virtually ignored. There it was to the north and the east and covered with ice. Yes, Greenland.

e_chaya / Flickr, https://flic.kr/p/4wMeCa

New England governors and eastern Canadian premiers last week signed a resolution on climate change. 

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A University of Vermont research effort got a $20 million boost this year to fund studies on how to make watersheds more resilient to extreme weather events, officials announced Monday.

iStock

It seems like real winter may have finally arrived in Vermont. But what about the long-term forecast? Not the prospects for the weekend, but what the state's climate is going to look like years, decades, or even centuries down the line. We're looking at what a rapidly changing climate is going to mean for our particular neck of the woods. 

Leaders from around the world are converging on Paris for the 2015 U.N. Climate Change Conference. The two-week event is designed to allow countries the chance to come to an agreement on stifling climate change.

NPR's Ari Shapiro hosts a 1-hour special, with the help of NPR reporters, as well as experts from science, government, and business, to explain what's at stake and how it may — or may not — change the world's energy economy.

Toby Talbot / AP/file

A Brattleboro nonprofit that promotes sustainable building design says green buildings should be able to prove that they can stand up to natural disasters, especially those associated with climate change.

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