Commentary Series

Frederic Silberman. / Flynn Center for the Performing Arts

Growing up in a working-class family in Chicago, I did not experience a lot of culture - but a school trip to the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater changed my life.

Discussions about the proposed Federal tax bill have focused almost exclusively on political winners and losers. But I think we should be debating larger questions like whether we should add $150 billion to the deficit each year, especially given the low unemployment rate.

Every year, about 4,000 people in Vermont turn 65 - roughly the population of Randolph – contributing to a nearly one-to-one ratio between young and older Vermonters.

One recent night I was late for a concert. But within minutes of my arrival in the hall, an unexpected harmony of words and melody startled me and brought tears to my eyes.

As the nation once again celebrates Thanksgiving, the annual question of what it really mean to be thankful reappears. Miles Anton of Brattleboro shares his perspective on what the purpose of Thanksgiving.

On the eve of a holiday full of tradition, Kiran Waqar of South Burlington reflects on what it means to be thankful in her family and how they've crafted their own traditions.

For the young and the agile, winter in Vermont means heading to the ski slopes or crisscrossing white fields, donning snowshoes or silver skates. But for many older Vermonters or anyone with mobility problems, winter can be more of a challenge than a game. Homes are shuttered, life moves indoors and social connections go dormant.

Women are speaking out and things are changing. Much of this shift can be traced to New York Times and New Yorker allegations that movie mogul Harvey Weinstein acted for decades as a serial sexual predator. More than sixty women have now spoken publicly about Weinstein’s transgressions against them, saying, “me, too.”

Keurig Green Mountain, the Waterbury company known for K-cups and coffeemakers, has been advertising on Fox News, specifically on Hannity. Hosted by Sean Hannity, the program is the most watched show in cable news – and that’s actually a big deal.

Molnar: Going Native

Nov 20, 2017

When we moved to Vermont a decade ago, my business clothes were left behind, along with many trappings of my former life.

They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. So I had my doubts about refreshing my rusty and uneven Spanish - which I needed for a recent solo trip to Mexico. But there are a host of new language acquisition strategies that replace rote memorization with comprehension.

The calendar tells me I’m old - eighty four. I could have been the oldest person in the audience the night of the Mavis Staples jazz concert in Burlington, but Mavis made me young.

I never think about getting older, but I do cultivate resilience.

A recent New Yorker article described how a private guardian convinced a judge to give her the power to remove an elderly Nevada couple from their house and send them to a nursing home, sell off their personal belongings and take control of their assets, completely shutting out their daughter, who visited nearly every day.

I peered into my clothes closet the other day and had one of those epiphanies people my age sometimes have about the passage of time.

So far, I’m finding middle age to be like adolescence – only better. Sure, my body’s changing in alarming ways: I’m again developing bumps and hair, but now the bumps are where my waist was, and the hair’s on my chin.

Here’s an existential question: If video killed the radio star, then what killed the video star? The surprising answer may be public media.

When my father turned 35, the average life expectancy for a white male in the United States was approximately 66 and a half years. His own father never retired because he worked up until he died.

Performing arts events bring people together for experiences of shared community. In this age of virtual community where we congregate on the Internet with millions of others we will never see or meet, it’s especially vital – and comforting – to interact with people that live in or visit our own place.

Not long ago, I took my five-year-old granddaughter to see a rollicking musical based on the popular children’s book Miss Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard and James Marshall.