Congress

Emily Alfin Johnson & Angela Evancie / VPR

According to the latest VPR Poll, Vermonters have been following the races for president and governor very closely. But the rest of the Vermont races, not so much. It's OK — that's where we come in.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Two people want to go to the U.S. House of Representatives on Vermont’s behalf to try to get things done in Washington.

Lauren Victoria Burke / AP/File

Vermont's sole congressman is a Democrat, but he's also received enough primary write-in votes to be the Republican candidate for Congress, too. We invite listeners to join the live conversation with Rep. Peter Welch on a wide range of issues.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

President Obama is expected to sign a federal GMO labeling bill into law soon. This would nullify Vermont's labeling law, as well as laws passed by Connecticut and Maine that have not been enacted yet — effective immediately.

After months of bargaining and backroom arguments, the Senate has voted in favor of a new national standard for labeling food that contains ingredients from genetically modified crops. The essence of the deal: Companies will have to disclose their GMO ingredients, but they won't have to put that information right on the label.

Many food companies are fiercely opposed to such GMO labels because they believe consumers will perceive them — incorrectly — as a warning that those products are nutritionally inferior or even unsafe to eat.

Rebecca Sananes / VPR

A debate in Congress over the term "illegal alien" has its roots at the campus of Dartmouth College. It all began when a group of students in 2014 petitioned the Library of Congress to abolish the term.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday took the first step to pass legislation that would overturn Vermont's law that requires the labeling of food that contains genetically modified ingredients. The proposed federal bill would prohibit individual states from enacting their own GMO labeling standards.

Cliff Owen / AP

Bernie Sanders has yet to suspend his presidential campaign, but he’s now getting back into the swing of things representing Vermont in the U.S. Senate. But he’s still focusing more on the national issues that fueled his popular rise than he seems to be on local issues.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

All three members of Vermont's Congressional delegation say they support a bi-partisan gun control compromise offered by Maine Sen. Susan Collins. And the delegation views the Collins proposal as just the first step in restricting access to firearms.

Petegar / iStock

A bipartisan deal has been reached by two key members of the U.S. Senate’s Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee on a national GMO labeling law that would nullify Vermont’s labeling law set to take effect on July 1.

Rep. Peter Welch's Office, courtesy

Starting Wednesday morning, U.S. House Democrats staged a rare sit-in on the House floor to demand action on gun violence. Vermont Rep. Peter Welch was among those that participated, and spoke to VPR Wednesday afternoon from the cloakroom off the House floor.

Sen. Patrick Leahy says he's disappointed the Senate won't act on what he calls "common sense" gun control legislation. In the aftermath of the horrific shooting tragedy in Orlando, Florida where 50 people were killed, there's been a lot of pressure on Congress to take steps to restrict gun sales. On Monday evening, Leahy's colleagues rejected bills proposed by both parties to deal with this issue.

Updated 2:30 a.m. ET Thursday:

Nearly 15 hours: The Associated Press reports that's how long Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy and his Democratic colleagues held the floor before yielding early Thursday, with a pledge that he would aggressively press for a legislative response to the Orlando, Fla., mass shooting. Murphy has been upset with congressional inaction on gun violence.

Original Post:

Senate Democrats say they are bringing Senate business to a halt in an effort to force some action on gun control.

Noah Berger / AP

During the current presidential campaign, Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders has received more individual contributions than any other person in the history of American politics.

And at the same time that Sanders campaigns tirelessly to win the party's nomination, he's also used his fundraising abilities to help local and state candidates across the country.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

The U.S. House has given its strong bi-partisan support to legislation that overhauls a 40-year-old law that regulates toxic chemicals. The proposal will bring more than 64,000 chemicals under the review of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Toby Talbot / AP File Photo

Fifteen years ago today, a senator from Vermont triggered a political earthquake. Sen. Jim Jeffords declared his independence from the Republican party on May 24, 2001.

Felipe Dana / AP

The Vermont Health Department is seeking a federal grant to help educate the public about the risks associated with the Zika virus. Health officials stress that it's very unlikely that mosquitos in Vermont will transmit the virus.

Seth Wenig / AP

After a strong showing in this week’s primaries, Hillary Clinton looks to be on a glide path to the Democratic presidential nomination. This has some of Bernie Sanders’ colleagues in Washington asking him to tone down the barbs.

Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy, the senior Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, says President Barack Obama should act “without delay” to nominate a replacement for Justin Antonin Scalia.

hh5800 / iStock

Last week, Congress delayed the imposition of a tax on expensive health care policies. Vermont state officials praised the move, but warned the tax will take effect eventually.

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