Congress

Catch Up With Vermont's Congressional Delegation

Sen. Patrick Leahy | Sen. Bernie Sanders | Rep. Peter Welch

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Sen. Patrick Leahy strongly condemned President Donald Trump’s plan to reconsider the government’s ban on torture and on “black sites,” secret detention facilities operated by the Central Intelligence Agency for the purpose of detaining, interrogating and sometimes torturing terror suspects.

Bob Kinzel / VPR file

During his gubernatorial campaign, Gov. Phil Scott said that if he was elected, he would move to eliminate Vermont's health care exchange and bring the state into the federal system. But just three weeks into his term, the message from his administration has changed dramatically. 

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

As questions swirl about the fate of immigration policy in the United States, Attorney General TJ Donovan is launching a task force to explore whether Vermont can blunt the impact of executive orders signed by President Donald Trump.

All three members of Vermont's Congressional delegation say they plan to attend the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump on Friday. More than 55 Democratic members of Congress have announced that they plan to boycott the event.

Neal Goswami / Vermont Press Bureau

Congressman Peter Welch told state lawmakers Wednesday that a repeal of the Affordable Care Act could result in the state of Vermont losing tens of millions of dollars in Medicaid funds.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

Sen. Bernie Sanders grilled President-elect Donald Trump's pick to head the Environmental Protection Agency at his confirmation hearing Wednesday, while Sen. Patrick Leahy called Scott Pruitt "unqualified" and says his appointment would be a "disaster for the country."

Oliver Parini for VPR

Sen. Patrick Leahy says a comprehensive review of publicly released reports and more detailed information provided to members of Congress leads to an inescapable conclusion: The Russian government used cyber espionage to influence the presidential election by trying to undermine the credibility of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

Andrew Harnik / AP

Sen. Bernie Sanders says he will remain an independent member of the U.S. Senate even as he works to reform the Democratic Party.

Oliver Parini for VPR/file

The House Democratic caucus, including Rep. Peter Welch, have voted to keep House minority leader Nancy Pelosi in her leadership position.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP

Republican Phil Scott will be Vermont's next governor. Progressive/Democrat David Zuckerman won the race for lieutenant governor, and T.J. Donovan will be Vermont's first new attorney general since 1997.

Emily Alfin Johnson & Angela Evancie / VPR

According to the latest VPR Poll, Vermonters have been following the races for president and governor very closely. But the rest of the Vermont races, not so much. It's OK — that's where we come in.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Two people want to go to the U.S. House of Representatives on Vermont’s behalf to try to get things done in Washington.

Lauren Victoria Burke / AP/File

Vermont's sole congressman is a Democrat, but he's also received enough primary write-in votes to be the Republican candidate for Congress, too. We invite listeners to join the live conversation with Rep. Peter Welch on a wide range of issues.

A bag of potato chips with a GMO label.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

President Obama is expected to sign a federal GMO labeling bill into law soon. This would nullify Vermont's labeling law, as well as laws passed by Connecticut and Maine that have not been enacted yet — effective immediately.

After months of bargaining and backroom arguments, the Senate has voted in favor of a new national standard for labeling food that contains ingredients from genetically modified crops. The essence of the deal: Companies will have to disclose their GMO ingredients, but they won't have to put that information right on the label.

Many food companies are fiercely opposed to such GMO labels because they believe consumers will perceive them — incorrectly — as a warning that those products are nutritionally inferior or even unsafe to eat.

Rebecca Sananes / VPR

A debate in Congress over the term "illegal alien" has its roots at the campus of Dartmouth College. It all began when a group of students in 2014 petitioned the Library of Congress to abolish the term.

A bag of potato chips with a GMO label.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday took the first step to pass legislation that would overturn Vermont's law that requires the labeling of food that contains genetically modified ingredients. The proposed federal bill would prohibit individual states from enacting their own GMO labeling standards.

Cliff Owen / AP

Bernie Sanders has yet to suspend his presidential campaign, but he’s now getting back into the swing of things representing Vermont in the U.S. Senate. But he’s still focusing more on the national issues that fueled his popular rise than he seems to be on local issues.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

All three members of Vermont's Congressional delegation say they support a bi-partisan gun control compromise offered by Maine Sen. Susan Collins. And the delegation views the Collins proposal as just the first step in restricting access to firearms.

Petegar / iStock

A bipartisan deal has been reached by two key members of the U.S. Senate’s Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee on a national GMO labeling law that would nullify Vermont’s labeling law set to take effect on July 1.

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