Court System

Lisa Velde, 58, of Tinmouth will serve eight months of a one to three year jail sentence for impeding the police investigation in the 2016 hit-and-run death of Leo Branchaud.  

In 1964, a fifteen-year-old boy named Gerald Gault was arrested after he and a friend made a lewd phone call to their neighbor. Over the next few weeks, Gault was repeatedly interrogated by police, adjudicated before a judge twice in chambers, and was subsequently committed to an Arizona juvenile detention facility until his twenty-first birthday.

Courtesy of Norwich University

Audio Pending...

Is there a gender bias when it comes to sentencing women convicted of murder as opposed to men? Norwich University professor Elizabeth Gurian studies this issue and recently got a grant from the American Association of University Women Fellowship for her work.

Professor Gurian spoke to VPR about her findings and how she handles doing this research.

CJ Gunther / AP

When the notice arrives that you've been selected for jury duty, some people wonder, "Why me?". Others look at it as their civic duty and as an opportunity to see the court system in action.

We speak with Stephanie Limoge, jury coordinator for the Vermont's Jury Administration Office, and Attorneys David Sleigh and Ritch Berger and Addison County State's Attorney Dave Fenster to get an idea of how people get picked for duty, how they might get out of serving and what goes into lawyers' decisions on who should sit in the jury on their case.