Department of Fish and Wildlife

Two lamprey out of water
bit245 / iStock

Rivers on the New York side of Lake Champlain will be treated with chemical pesticides this fall in an effort to control parasitic sea lamprey.

A survey from the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department assesses Vermonter's opinions on a variety of issues. We're talking about the results.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department has just released a new comprehensive survey that examines how Vermonters look at issues including fishing, hunting, trapping and wildlife preservation. We’re looking at these results and what they mean for the future of the state's wildlife.

Drew Price holds up the 30-inch pike-pickerel hybrid he caught recently in Lake Champlain. In landing the fish, he became the first person in Vermont to complete the Master Angler Sweep, which involves catching trophy-sized specimens of 33 fish species.
Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife, courtesy

Fishing enthusiast Drew Price, of Colchester, has become the first person in Vermont to complete the daunting "Master Angler Sweep."

John Dillon / VPR

A Nature Conservancy project in northern Vermont will store carbon to meet California’s greenhouse gas reduction goals. The group says proceeds from the sale of these “carbon credits” will pay for future land protection projects.

A shot of Buck Lake in Woodbury Vermont on a blue sky day.
Tom Rogers / Vermont Fish & Wildlife, courtesy

A state-run summer camp is underway in Woodbury, where up to 60 kids a week experience a hands-on, outdoor learning environment.

Fish and Wildlife technician Taylor Booth, left, and biologist Chet Mackenzie measure a male sturgeon caught in the Winooski River.
John Dillon / VPR

An ancient fish still swims in Lake Champlain. Biologists and anglers are seeing more giant, long-lived lake sturgeon here, even as an environmental group calls for greater protection for the species around the country.

Warden Arnold Magoon, shown here on duty before his death in 1978, will be honored Saturday by the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department, Provided

This month marks the 40th anniversary of the death of Vermont game warden Arnold Magoon, who was killed in the line of duty.

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department will honor Magoon on Saturday by placing a memorial on his family's property in Brandon.

A male brook trout in his spawning colors. Trout Unlimited wants the state to reduce the catch limit to 12 a day to six.
file

As Vermont’s trout season opens, an environmental group is calling on the state to reduce the number of brook trout that can be taken.

Moose are falling victim to winter ticks, whose population is booming because of climate change. The state says some very limited hunting of the big animals should still be allowed.
Sandy Macys / AP

The state is proposing to drastically reduce the number of permits to hunt moose as the population continues to suffer from a parasite that has grown more abundant with climate change.

A coyote walks in snowy wooded area.
LeFion / iStock

The ban on “holding or participating" in coyote-killing tournaments was included in a major fish and wildlife bill that passed the Vermont House this week.

This catamount is on display at the Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.
Matthew Johnson / Vermont Historical Society

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says there is no evidence that the catamount is still roaming in the Northeast, and the federal agency has officially removed the large cat from the federal endangered species list.

Moose in Vermont and across New England are dwindling due to more deaths from parasites like winter ticks, which are also linked to poor calving rates and low survivorship among new calves.
George Bosworth / Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

As Vermont's moose population continues to decline, state wildlife biologists say a warming climate is behind an explosion in winter ticks and "skyrocketing" levels of brain parasites, both of which are keeping moose mortality high and calving rates low.

Faced with a dwindling population and mounting threats, what does the future of moose management—and moose hunting—look like in Vermont?

Chris Bernier / Vermont Fish And Wildlife Department

Biologists Kent McFarland and Sara Zahendra traveled by snowmobile into the wilderness of the Northeast Kingdom in hopes of spotting a Canada lynx or lynx tracks.

The Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife is holding a series of meetings around Vermont to update residents on the condition of the state's moose herd. The first meeting was held in Island Pond.
Toby Talbot / AP/File

Vermont’s moose population is in trouble and scientists fear climate change is to blame.

Former Fish & Wildlife board chairman Brian Ames, left, and photographer Candace Brown discuss who should be able to use the state boat launches while standing along the Connecticut River in Putney.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont's boaters and anglers pay for public boat launches through their license fees and specific use-taxes, and the general public is not allowed to park at the areas for other uses. But the chairman of the committee on Fish, Wildlife & Water Resources says the boat launch areas should be available to everyone.

A moose enjoys a rainy day in Woodbury, Vermont. We're talking about the state of the state's wildlife.
Charles Wohlers / flickr

From fish to snakes to bears, wildlife in Vermont face some big challenges. The bear population is growing, and that's raising concern in some residential areas. The number of deer is on the rise, but the state's moose herd is struggling. And some species are being affected by climate change.

We're talking with Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Louis Porter about these issues and others.

The gloved hand of a biologist holds a little brown bat in Vermont.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

Stand outside at night and you might glimpse the swift, darting profile of a bat flying overhead. That sight wasn't rare in the past, but bats in this region have had it rough for years due to white-nose syndrome, and biologists are still working to understand and protect these tiny flying mammals.

Wildlife biologist David Sausville of Vermont Fish and Wildlife holds a Canada goose before it gets inspected and banded. Every summer the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife asks the public to help round up resident Canada geese.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Have you ever caught a wild goose? Well, every year Vermont Fish and Wildlife invites the public to do just that, helping them corral wild Canada geese in order to record and band the birds.

Vermont Fish & Wildlife, Courtesy

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is warning people to mitigate the possibility of having a bad encounter with a bear. The department is already gearing up for what they expect to be record human-bear interactions this year.

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