Department of Public Service

Stock image of fiber-optic cables.
kynny / iStock

The Public Utility Commission is opening an investigation into service complaints toward Consolidated Communications.

AP/Toby Talbot

The state will expand a high-speed broadband network that could serve hundreds of customers in the Northeast Kingdom.

Mobile phone antennaes on a telecommunication tower on a blue-sky background.
Emanuele D'Amico / iStock

The state wants to make it easier for telecommunication companies to upgrade their cell towers.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The Vermont Department of Public Service says it’s not yet ready to give up on CoverageCo, the struggling cell service company.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

Vermonters with cell phone service provided by CoverageCo continue to have spotty service. Now, a group of Vermont lawmakers is asking the Department of Public Service for more details on how the state’s going to deal with the ongoing problems.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

Vermont has been trying to get cell service into every corner of the state, and a few years ago, a new technology offered promise by mounting mini cell towers along utility poles.

But just last week the state learned that CoverageCo — the company that’s operating the cell system — is about to shut down after losing money on the experiment.

In a unanimous decision, the Public Utility Commission found that Vermont can regulate Voice over Internet Protocol service under federal law.
Ingram Publishing / Thinkstock

The Public Utility Commission says Vermont can regulate Voice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, service.

Georgia Mountain Wind

The head of the Vermont Department of Public Service says it would require significant resources for the state to take a more proactive role in tracking down businesses and individuals that violate their state permits when operating renewable energy projects.

And for now, it's just "not feasible."

A tree downed on a powerline in Monkton, Vermont. Thousands of homes and buisnesses have been without power since wind storms hit the region on Sunday.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Every year, electric utilities clear trees and vegetation around power lines. With several thousand homes and business in Vermont still without power after Sunday's windstorm, could more clearing prevented these lengthy outages?

The Public Utility Commission will investigate the business practices of a national solar energy company that opened its Vermont office in 2015.

Melody Bodette / VPR

The Department of Public Service has rejected New Haven's energy plan.

A consultant hired by the state says the majority of Green Mountain Power's planned system investments haven't been properly regulated. The result is a $73 million disagreement between the state and the utility.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR File

As regulators decide 2018 electric rates for Green Mountain Power customers, a disagreement between the state and GMP raises a $73 million question about regulation of Vermont's largest electric utility.

AP File Photo

The state has scheduled its first public hearing on the proposed sale of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant.

The Public Service Board has renewed Comcast's certificate of public good.

The cable company is required to have its CPG renewed every 11 years, and the board issued its order late last week after a year of hearings.

Vermont regulators have denied a request from Vermont Gas to kick a group of Hinesburg residents out of legal proceedings related to the company’s plans to build its pipeline through a park in Hinesburg.

If you live in Vermont, there's a good chance your electric bill will go up a bit this fall. State regulators at the Department of Public Service have approved a rate increase for Green Mountain Power, the state's largest utility.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Officials at the Department of Public Service were considering a policy earlier this year that would make negotiations between the department and utilities more open. Critics have said for years that deals made in private negotiations between utilities and the department are more beneficial for the companies than for their customers. The department disagrees.

The Department of Public Service and Vermont Gas Systems are calling on the Public Service Board to take action to prevent protestors from disrupting board proceedings, according to filings with the board Thursday.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Vermont’s Public Service Board is considering closing the public out of some hearings related to the Vermont Gas Systems pipeline to Addison County, according to a board order.

Earlier this month, Vermont’s Department of Public Service released hundreds of documents in response to a public records request from VPR. All of the documents relate to the department’s preparation of a report, ordered by the Legislature, analyzing the department’s ratepayer advocacy work.

Pages