Economic Development

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Consumer demand is driving farmers to grow and sell more produce, even as the days grow shorter and colder.

The Public Service Board has agreed to open a hearing to settle a long running dispute between VTel and Springfield Area Public Access Television (SAPA).

Howard Weiss-Tisman / vpr

As Vernon continues to head toward a referendum on siting a natural gas power plant in town, investors with serious money are waiting to see how the vote turns out.

If a natural gas power plant is built in Vernon it's going to take between $10 million and $12 million just to do the planning and preliminary work, and if the project doesn't move forward, for whatever reason, that money could be lost.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Five weeks ago, House Speaker Shap Smith issued a public plea for economic development proposals. He’s now assembled a panel of private sector officials to sift through the submissions, and help craft new legislation.

Toby Talbot / AP

Applications are now being accepted for the first round of funds provided by Entergy Vermont Yankee for economic development in Windham County. In a settlement with the state, Entergy agreed to pay $10 million over five years to help the region recover from the plant’s closing later this year.

Nina Keck / VPR

It’s not often that a press conference includes tearing down a building. But city and state officials gathered in Rutland Monday to demolish the first of a number of blighted properties in the city’s northwest neighborhood. The event kicks off a $1.25 million renewal project aimed at boosting property values, lowering crime and encouraging homeownership.

Windham County resident Stephan Morse will serve as interim executive director of the Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation. The position opened up recently when Governor Peter Shumlin tapped current director Patricia Moulton Powden as Secretary of the State Agency of Commerce and Community Development. Moulton Powden had only been director of the Brattleboro development group for a few months when the administration announced her new appointment.

VPR/Susan Keese

More than 50 experts and officials met in Putney Wednesday to begin to plan a national conference for regions and states facing nuclear plant closings.

The country will see a landslide of nuclear plant closings in the next few decades, organizer Jeff Lewis told the group. He said the economic and social impacts on those regions will be severe. But Lewis says there isn’t much information on how host communities and states can protect their interests when nuclear power plants stop operating.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

The city of Newport is poised for major economic development. But a lingering social problem seems to have gotten worse this winter. Community activists say they are seeing a rise in homelessness in a city with no emergency shelter.

On Newport’s Main Street, Brenda’s Restaurant is an early morning oasis for people who may have spent a bitterly cold night outdoors. 

Chatting with her friend Neil Morrissette, owner Brenda LePage says she’s happy to feed them for free.

Susan Keese / VPR

Six colleges in southeastern Vermont have formed a partnership that will allow students at any of the schools to take classes at the others.

The agreement is part of a wide-ranging economic development effort in the region. Officials from the six institutions of higher learning met in Brattleboro Monday to sign off on the new Windham Higher Education Cooperative.  The cooperative’s cross-registration agreement will enable students in degree programs to take up to one course each term at the other institutions. 

Jim Cole / AP

A $100 million natural gas facility may soon come to Groveton, a northern New Hampshire town just across the Vermont border. The plant would employ over 80 people in an area that desperately needs an economic boost. 

White River Junction could get badly needed affordable housing, if a developer can continue his streak of successful projects for the downtown.

Matt Bucy is proposing to convert the former American Legion into office space and small rental units. Bucy takes an unconventional approach to downtown development, but so far, it’s making him popular in a town that’s trying to re-invent itself as an arts mecca.

Vermont's largest electric utility says its customers won't see any increase in their base rate for power for at least two years.

In a filing on Friday with state regulators, Green Mountain Power said efficiencies from its merger with Central Vermont Public Service and a continued focus on cost controls means the company can keep base rate flats for the foreseeable future.