Education

The home for VPR's coverage of education issues and policy in Vermont.

The Education Team

Follow VPR reporters Amy Kolb Noyes and Howard Weiss-Tisman on Twitter for the latest on education issues across Vermont.

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Act 46 | Kids & Parenting | University Of Vermont | Vermont Legislature | Agency of Education

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Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Representatives from small schools across Vermont attended the State Board of Education meeting in Rutland on Wednesday to try to convince the board not to change the state’s Small School Grants program.

Gov. Phil Scott addresses the Vermont Senate after lawmakers adjourned the legislative session Saturday night. Scott, who is expected to veto the state budget, says there's a "fundamental disagreement" between him and legislators.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

The $5.8 billion budget passed by the Vermont Legislature late Saturday night is supposed to fund government through the middle of 2019, but the spending plan will more likely have a shelf life of only a few days.

Students gathered in the Waterman building to call on UVM to do more to address racial justice, inequity and diversity on campus.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Earlier this year, University of Vermont student organization NoNames for Justice pushed the school to address issues of racial justice reform. With the semester drawing to a close and graduation just days away, I spoke with two of the group's leaders about what — if anything — they feel has been accomplished.

Old Stone House Museum Director Molly Veysey and Deputy Director Walter Parenteau stand in front of the Orleans County Historical Society building and under the sign.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Next week the Old Stone House Museum, in Brownington, opens for the season. And the Orleans County Historical Society’s museum has a pair of new leaders with some big ideas for the popular school field trip destination.

Julie Ste. Marie in her classroom with student, Avery Sevigny
Julie Ste. Marie, courtesy

Twenty-one thousand Vermonters, many employed by Vermont school districts, have had problems with the health reimbursements they are supposed to receive from their employers.

Gov. Phil Scott says an anti-racism bill passed by the Legislature contains an unconstitutional provision. But though he vetoed the bill, he says he'll move forward voluntarily with an almost identical initiative.
Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Gov. Phil Scott’s five-year education plan may have landed with a thud in the Vermont Statehouse, but the administration hopes to have better luck with people outside the Montpelier political bubble.

This week the College of St. Joseph board of trustees voted to keep the school open, outlining several strategies to bring in additional revenue.
Nina Keck / VPR

The College of St. Joseph, in Rutland, will not be closing its doors.

In April, the college announced it was considering folding due to financial troubles. But the board of trustees voted on Monday to keep the school open, outlining several strategies to increase revenue. 

Facing a $58 million funding gap, Vermont lawmakers and the governor have competing proposals to pay for Vermont's schools in the final weeks of the legislative session.
Miatagirl / iStock

How will Vermont fund its schools? Gov. Scott's new plan would use nearly $60 million dollars in one-time funds to keep property taxes down, but Democrats in the legislature balked at a plan they say has a number of problems. 

An empty classroom of desks, one with a pencil and composition book sitting on it.
diane39 / iStock

A spokeswoman for Gov. Phil Scott says the governor will likely not name an interim education secretary before he receives a list of secretary candidates from the State Board of Education.

Gov. Phil Scott listens Monday as economists deliver the latest revenue forecast. Scott wants to use this year's budget surplus to buy down property tax rates next year. Democratic lawmakers say the money can be put to better uses.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Elected officials in Montpelier learned Monday they’ll end the fiscal year with a $44 million budget surplus. But the unexpected windfall hasn’t ended the acrimony between Republican Gov. Phil Scott and Democratic lawmakers.

21,000 Vermonters, many employed by Vermont School Districts, have had problems with the health reimbursements they are supposed to receive from their employers.

Brattleboro Union High School students prepare to raise a Black Lives Matter flag on the flagpole outside the school.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

On Friday, students at Brattleboro Union High School and Brattleboro Area Middle School raised Black Lives Matter flags on the flagpoles in front of the school.

An empty classroom with desks and a chalkboard.
maroke / iStock

Gov. Phil Scott’s latest plan to curb costs in the public school system has received a chilly response from Democratic lawmakers — and organizations that represent school boards, superintendents and teachers in Vermont are also concerned about the governor’s proposal.

The Board of Trustees at College of St. Joseph is considering closing the school as it faces low enrollment and budget pressure.
Nina Keck / VPR

Last week, news surfaced that College of St. Joseph in Rutland is considering closing its doors for good. The private, Catholic liberal arts school currently has around 200 undergraduates.

According to campaign finance disclosures, Republican Gov. Phil Scott has raised more than twice as much money toward his 2018 reelection bid than any of the other four candidates challenging him for the office.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Administration officials say Gov. Phil Scott will unveil a plan Tuesday to plug a nearly $60 million hole in the state’s education fund.

A wall display at Northfield Elementary School featured the covers of all this year's nominees for the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Award.
Meg Malone / VPR

Dorothy’s List readers have cast their ballots and the results have been tallied. The winner of this year’s Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Award is the World War II novel Projekt 1065 by Alan Gratz!

Eight students sit in a library holding up copies of Firoozeh's Dumas' novel "It Ain't So Awful, Falafel."
Meg Malone / VPR

At the Orchard Elementary School in South Burlington, students come from a variety of cultural backgrounds. In fact, about a third of the students speak a language other than English at home. 

Last fall, a group of Orchard fifth-graders gathered to discuss It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel, a novel about an Iranian-born girl living in California in the late 1970s and early 1980s – much like author Firoozeh Dumas.

SoundCheck members pose onstage at Peoples Academy. Back row (L-R): Brian Boyes, Elizabeth Autorino, Ruby Klarich, Liam Mears, Wilson Knight, Paige Thibault, Bruno John. Front row (L-R): Cameron Mueller-Harder, Grace Carlomango, Logan "Loganic" Wedge.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There’s been an upswing of student activism in 2018, from Black Lives Matter flags flying at schools to school walkouts against gun violence. Now there’s a group of Vermont students providing a soundtrack for those actions.

State and Essex Police at Essex High School during an April 2017 school lockdown.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

School shootings across the country—and a potentially averted shooting in Vermont—spurred Gov. Phil Scott to call for a security review for all Vermont schools. We're looking at the assessment's results and the holes it identified in school safety. 

Commissioner of Finance Adam Greshin, right, and Brad James from the Agency of Education, second from right, brief lawmakers Monday on a plan that would try to reduce payroll costs in public schools by penalizing districts with higher staffing levels.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

The Scott administration unveiled a new plan Monday to curb costs in the public education system by cutting payroll in local schools.

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