Education

The home for VPR's coverage of education issues and policy in Vermont.

The Education Team

Follow VPR reporters Amy Kolb Noyes and Howard Weiss-Tisman on Twitter for the latest on education issues across Vermont.

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Act 46 | Kids & Parenting | University Of Vermont | Vermont Legislature | Agency of Education

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Shirts with Vermont Law School on them hang in Barrister's Book Shop in downtown South Royalton.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

In South Royalton, there’s a great craft beer bar, a bustling food co-op and a new coffee shop opening — but just about anyone you ask will tell you the town’s economic future depends on a healthy Vermont Law School.

How To Make A Civics Education Stick

Aug 14, 2018

How do you teach kids to be active participants in government? Or to tell the difference between real news and fake news?

In their last legislative sessions, 27 states considered bills or other proposals that aim to answer these questions. Many of those proposals are rooted in popular ideas about the best ways to teach civics, including when kids should start, what they should learn and how to apply those lessons. Here's a look at some of those concepts.

Book lovers, get ready for a slew of reading suggestions on "Vermont Edition."
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Think of all the people you've met, places you've traveled, dishes you've tasted. All in the pages of the books you've read. Vermont Edition presents our summer reading show to introduce you to more new worlds by offering a tome of book recommendations.

Dan French, at podium, with Gov. Phil Scott in the background.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott says his pick to serve as the state’s new secretary of education will help his administration curb spending growth in public schools.

Information sheets on PFAS sit on Grafton Elementary School Principal Liz Harty's desk. The school is one of two with levels of the chemicals above the state's safe drinking water standard.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two Vermont schools have levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) above Vermont’s safe drinking water standard.

Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont is trying out a program where some students will receive reduced tuition in exchange for a percentage of their income for a set time after they graduate.
Patti Daniels / VPR File

If you’re going to college this fall, instead of taking out a student loan to help pay tuition, how about getting some money up front from your school? But there's a catch: Your school will take a percentage of your income for a set amount of time after you graduate.

According to a 1996 sudy, students lose an average of two months worth of knowledge over summer break every year.
Baona / iStock

Anyone who's been through school remembers the glory of summer vacation -- and the blues of the following fall. Well that slow return to school is actually a documented phenomenon with a name: the "summer slide."

An illustration of a row of houses with a green background.
filo / iStock

The Vermont Department of Taxes was not able to process all of the property tax adjustment claims in time to meet a July 1 deadline. As a result, towns that sent out their tax bills on that date may have sent the wrong information to property owners.

So far, more than 250 schools have applied for state grant money to improve their security infrastructure.
Kameleon007 / iStock

This spring, the state conducted a wide ranging survey on the security of its schools in response to an alleged attempted school shooting and allocated $4 million in grants for those schools to improve their security. Now the money is available and grant applications have been pouring in.

Vermont Law School sign on a fall day in October 2012.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press FIle

There is turmoil at Vermont Law School following the news that tenure has been revoked for 14 out of 19 faculty members at the South Royalton institution. A recent VTDigger article revealed the 75 percent reduction in tenured faculty as part of a plan to help restructure finances that have taken a hit from ongoing budget deficits.

Ninety school districts - about a quarter of Vermont’s communities - have proposed meeting Act 46’s goals through collaboration rather than formal merger.

A row of classroom desks
mygueart / iStock

The State Board of Education has laid out its ground rules for a series of meetings that will give school districts a chance to push back against the education secretary’s proposed Act 46 state plan.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner gives a thumbs up outside the Supreme Court, Wednesday, in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that government workers can't be forced to contribute to labor unions that represent them in collective bargaining.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Public-sector unions in Vermont are denouncing Wednesday's Supreme Court decision that says nonunion members cannot be asked to help pay for collective bargaining.

So far, more than 250 schools have applied for state grant money to improve their security infrastructure.
Kameleon007 / iStock

The dispute between Gov. Phil Scott and legislative leaders over property tax rates went on for weeks, and while the governor announced Monday he'll let the latest state budget pass without his signature, there are some who believe the fight was about much more than money and tax rates.

They think it's about who will control future education policies: local school boards or the state?

One of three Dartmouth psychological and brain sciences professors under state investigation surrounding sexual misconduct allegations is retiring effective immediately.

The college was on track to fire Todd Heatherton after completing its own investigation. That was the recommendation of the dean of the faculty of arts and sciences.

(Click here for earlier reporting by NHPR.)

Chaunce Benedict, from Swanton, attended the State Board of Education meeting in Barre. Benedict is a former superintendent and says small schools should not lose their annual grant payments.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The State Board of Education is bumping up against a June 30 deadline for addressing proposed changes to Vermont’s small school grant program.

Desks in a line in an empty classroom. Up close of one with books in it.
GlobalStock / iStock

The Vermont State Board of Education has released a schedule for its three regional meetings to collect local testimony on the statewide Act 46 merger plan that was recently released by the Agency of Education.

Castleton University has faced layoffs, one of the moves made by the Vermont State Colleges System to combat falling enrollments.
Lisa Rathke / Associated Press

Colleges throughout Vermont and New England are facing falling enrollments and rising costs. We're talking about how Vermont state colleges are dealing with this challenging combination.

A member of the College of St. Joseph esports team during practice.
College of St. Joseph, Courtesy

As video games like League of Legends and Fortnite have grown in popularity, so have competitions involving these games. Now the College of St. Joseph in Rutland has added esports to its athletic roster, alongside the likes of soccer, basketball and volleyball. Despite the school's struggles with enrollment and plans to avoid closure, the program has now added a new esports arena.

After Hurricane Maria last September, a few thousand school aged-students were among those who left Puerto Rico with their families and came to New England. As the school year wraps up some of them are graduating, thousands of miles away from home.

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