Education

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

When a group of parents in the Northeast Kingdom perceived a lack of commitment to musical education in their public school, they decided to do something about it. So they started a band. 

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Student newspapers at high schools and colleges are often the proving ground for budding journalists. But in Vermont right now, there's a debate over how much "freedom of the press" applies to these young news gatherers.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

At the School for International Training in Brattleboro, students and staff are still trying to understand the impact of President Trump's controversial travel ban on refugees and visa holders.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

An effort to boost public support for one of the most poorly-funded state college systems in the nation could go by the wayside if Democratic lawmakers and Republican Gov. Phil Scott can’t find a budget compromise.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

If books are supposed to open up new worlds to readers, then Victoria Jamieson's graphic novel Roller Girl has hit its mark with a group of young readers at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

Kristina Ohl, courtesy

As part of their senior seminar, a group of Middlebury College students took a close look at the Vermont dairy industry. They looked into the issue of farm viability and related their findings in a series of three podcast episodes called CowTalk.

Howard Weisss-Tisman / VPR News

Vermont lawmakers are debating whether they should slow the process for implementing the state's school consolidation law in order to give more challenging districts extra time to figure things out.

Bob Kinzel / VPR

The Senate Education committee has unanimously voted to oppose Gov. Phil Scott's plan to mandate that all school budgets be leveled-funded next year — and that rejection has broad budget implications.

Stefan Hard / Times Argus

This week in his budget address, Gov. Phil Scott unveiled a major education plan. As a start, Scott wants to mandate that all school budgets be level-funded next year.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

As it becomes increasingly apparent that Gov. Phil Scott’s bombshell budget proposal Tuesday won’t pass muster in either the House or Senate, key legislators are already asking the Republican for an alternative spending package. It does not appear that one is forthcoming.

In this session of the legislature, lawmakers have the chance to help student journalism thrive in Vermont.

Stefan Hard / Times Argus file

It’s safe to say that Gov. Phil Scott caught lawmakers by surprise with his budget address on Tuesday. And for many of them, that surprise was not a pleasant one.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A school choice proponent who supports President Trump's controversial nominee to lead the Department of Education, Betsy DeVos, was in Montpelier Wednesday to speak about education policy.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

In what would amount to unprecedented legislative intervention in local education spending, Republican Gov. Phil Scott has asked lawmakers to wrest control over school budgets so that his administration can fund an array of child care programs and higher-education initiatives.

I understand, in theory, why the State Board of Education wants more watchdog power over independent schools that educate some students at state expense, if there are no public schools available in those communities. I also get why some private school parents are outraged. But not all the media coverage I’ve seen accurately explains the proposed rule changes.

Neustockimages / iStock.com

The general assumption has been that the higher the student loan debt, the more likely for a young adult to "boomerang" back to their parents' house. According to a recent study though, it's a more complicated than that.

Members of the State Board of Education will meet Friday to talk about proposed changes to the rules governing independent schools.

The State Board of Education approved four more Act 46 merger plans at its monthly meeting Tuesday.

Green Mountain Valley School, in Fayston, has been named a “development site” and “high performance center” for the U.S. Ski Team. The new designations are part of a training partnership program being promoted by the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association, which oversees the U.S. Ski Team.

In his inaugural address, Gov. Phil Scott identified a number of broad areas where he hopes to have a significant impact on the operations of state government. But Scott is leaving the details of these new proposals to his budget address that he'll deliver in 10 days.

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