Education

The home for VPR's coverage of education issues and policy in Vermont.

The Education Team

Follow VPR reporters Amy Kolb Noyes and Howard Weiss-Tisman on Twitter for the latest on education issues across Vermont.

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Act 46 | Kids & Parenting | University Of Vermont | Vermont Legislature | Agency of Education

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Exterior of Wolcott Elementary School on an overcast day.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A nearly 200-page report was released by the Vermont Agency of Education on Friday, and school districts around Vermont are going through the state's school consolidation recommendations.

E-cigarettes like the Juul have caught on with teens in a big way, and schools have been struggling to keep up. We'll talk about vaping's new popularity, and the health issues involved.
Steven Senne / AP

The popularity of vaping among young people is sounding alarm bells for educators and health professionals, as trendy e-cigarettes like the Juul are becoming a more common sight in middle and high schools. We're talking about where the rise in this behavior is coming from, the health issues at stake and what schools and the state are doing in response.

Derek Campbell / Catamount Arts

[Short orchestral music selection...]

That’s a passage from Intrada, by Ralph Vaughn Williams, performed a few weeks ago by the Northeast Kingdom Community Orchestra.

Kristina Naylor, of Dummerston, talks with Brattleboro school board member David Scholaes at an Act 46 Alternative Governance Structure meeting last year.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

On Friday, the Vermont Agency of Education will release a proposed statewide merger plan.

School boards that have not yet merged under Act 46 — and are instead seeking approval for their "alternative governance structure" plans — will be watching closely to see if their proposals were accepted.

courtesy Eli Burakian, Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College is considering its publishing options after the press consortium it's a part of voted to close in April.

Zymora Davinchi, Rep. Kiah Morris, and Keith Goslant, from right, spoke in support of an ethnic studies bill at a forum in May. Supporters of the legisaltion have struggled to gain traction for the bill in Montpelier.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Racial justice advocates say students of color often don’t see themselves reflected in public school curriculum in Vermont, but supporters of an ethnic studies bill are having a tough time getting traction in Montpelier.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A group of professional actors based in White River Junction are bringing the Bard of Avon to six area schools this year. It's part of the Northern Stage theater group's program that aims to get young performers acquainted with the works of William Shakespeare.

Randolph Police said they don’t anticipate bringing charges after a threat made by a middle school student forced the closing of the five schools in the Orange Southwest School District

A group of faculty at Dartmouth College has organized under the American Association of University Professors.

The group is taking aim at three key issues: reforming the tenure process, increasing job security and workplace rights for adjunct professors, and securing academic freedom.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Brattleboro school district wants to develop a new protocol for what visitors invited to speak at student assemblies can address after a recent discussion on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict upset some community members.

Desks in a line in an empty classroom. Up close of one with books in it.
GlobalStock / iStock

The State Board of Education has given Gov. Phil Scott three candidates to consider for the next secretary of education.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Representatives from small schools across Vermont attended the State Board of Education meeting in Rutland on Wednesday to try to convince the board not to change the state’s Small School Grants program.

Gov. Phil Scott addresses the Vermont Senate after lawmakers adjourned the legislative session Saturday night. Scott, who is expected to veto the state budget, says there's a "fundamental disagreement" between him and legislators.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

The $5.8 billion budget passed by the Vermont Legislature late Saturday night is supposed to fund government through the middle of 2019, but the spending plan will more likely have a shelf life of only a few days.

Students gathered in the Waterman building to call on UVM to do more to address racial justice, inequity and diversity on campus.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Earlier this year, University of Vermont student organization NoNames for Justice pushed the school to address issues of racial justice reform. With the semester drawing to a close and graduation just days away, I spoke with two of the group's leaders about what — if anything — they feel has been accomplished.

Old Stone House Museum Director Molly Veysey and Deputy Director Walter Parenteau stand in front of the Orleans County Historical Society building and under the sign.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Next week the Old Stone House Museum, in Brownington, opens for the season. And the Orleans County Historical Society’s museum has a pair of new leaders with some big ideas for the popular school field trip destination.

Julie Ste. Marie in her classroom with student, Avery Sevigny
Julie Ste. Marie, courtesy

Twenty-one thousand Vermonters, many employed by Vermont school districts, have had problems with the health reimbursements they are supposed to receive from their employers.

Gov. Phil Scott says an anti-racism bill passed by the Legislature contains an unconstitutional provision. But though he vetoed the bill, he says he'll move forward voluntarily with an almost identical initiative.
Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Gov. Phil Scott’s five-year education plan may have landed with a thud in the Vermont Statehouse, but the administration hopes to have better luck with people outside the Montpelier political bubble.

This week the College of St. Joseph board of trustees voted to keep the school open, outlining several strategies to bring in additional revenue.
Nina Keck / VPR

The College of St. Joseph, in Rutland, will not be closing its doors.

In April, the college announced it was considering folding due to financial troubles. But the board of trustees voted on Monday to keep the school open, outlining several strategies to increase revenue. 

Facing a $58 million funding gap, Vermont lawmakers and the governor have competing proposals to pay for Vermont's schools in the final weeks of the legislative session.
Miatagirl / iStock

How will Vermont fund its schools? Gov. Scott's new plan would use nearly $60 million dollars in one-time funds to keep property taxes down, but Democrats in the legislature balked at a plan they say has a number of problems. 

An empty classroom of desks, one with a pencil and composition book sitting on it.
diane39 / iStock

A spokeswoman for Gov. Phil Scott says the governor will likely not name an interim education secretary before he receives a list of secretary candidates from the State Board of Education.

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