Education

The back-and-forth between Dartmouth faculty and College President Phil Hanlon continues over the school's response to comments by Mark Bray. Bray is a faculty member and has been a prominent speaker on the Antifa movement since the clashes in Charlottesville.

In a statement last month, President Hanlon distanced the college from Bray's comments around the role of violence in taking on white supremacy.

The U.S. Department of Education has approved Vermont's state plan required under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Dartmouth lecturer Mark Bray, who writes and speaks about the Antifa, has been under fire from Dartmouth College's President Philip J. Hanlon.
screenshot from C-SPAN video

Dartmouth faculty and President Philip Hanlon are at odds over one lecturer's controversial writings and media appearances about the Antifa, non-organized activists who say they oppose facism.

I know I’m not the only history teacher who’s been wrestling with profound doubts about what we’ve done or, perhaps, what we haven’t. Given the erosion of civility, even of rationality, and the increasing divisiveness that characterize our national discourse, we can’t avoid wondering if our work has been so poor that we’ve contributed to today’s civic chaos.

The state Agency of Education has published the wrong rules for special education services on its website.
GlenJ / iStockphoto.com

Special education departments across Vermont may have been using the wrong rules to guide decisions over what services children receive. That's because Agency of Education officials say the wrong draft of the state's special education rules were filed with the Secretary of State back in 2013.

UVM President Tom Sullivan at a 2013 news conference. Sullivan has led the university since 2012.
Toby Talbot / AP

Colleges and universities have been at the center of some controversial issues lately. We're talking with University of Vermont President  Tom Sullivan about these issues and how they play out at Vermont’s largest public university. 

A legislative committee has been meeting this summer to try to figure out how private schools that take public money should serve special education students.

The U.S. Department of Education says Vermont has to give more information about how the state will measure student progress under the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA.

What can educators do to help integrate refugees into their new communities? An associate professor at the University of Vermont will lead an effort to find out, thanks to a Fulbright award to conduct research on refugee integration in western Canada.

I’m old enough to remember when digital learning meant using human digits to move a pencil around on a piece of paper.

Women attend the second of five classes on home repair sponsored by NeighborWorks of Western Vermont. The course, which is taught by Morgan Overable, is geared especially for women.
Nina Keck / VPR

According to federal data, more single women are purchasing homes than single men. So a new how-to course in Rutland taught by – and designed for – women, is teaching students how to tackle the basics of home repair.

Campers at Zeno Mountain Farms spend a month living in wheelchair-accessible tree houses, performing, making films and taking care of one another.
Jon Kalish / For VPR

Every summer adults living with developmental disabilities and their able-bodied friends spend a month on Zeno Mountain in Lincoln, Vermont, living in wheelchair-accessible tree houses and caring for one-another.

Musicians and child care advocates gathered at a Burlington recording studio last week to work on the arrangement for 'Something Beautiful'. Shown here, from the left, are Chris Dorman, Anna Gebhardt, Kat Wright, Bob Wagner and Josh Weinstein.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

If all goes as organizers plan, a 1,000-person flash mob will be singing and dancing on Church Street in Burlington October 1 in support of adequate early childhood care for Vermont's kids.

The town of Vernon voted Tuesday to leave the Brattleboro Union High School district.

Peter Drescher, technology coordinator for the Vermont Agency of Education, says teachers can do a better job of embracing technology in the classroom.
skynesher / iStock

Vermont still has a lot of work to do to fully integrate technology into public school classrooms, according to the latest draft of the state's digital learning plan, put out by the Agency of Education.

With all the talk in the news today about alternative facts and untrue statements, I’ve been reminded that before Google and Wikipedia, the best source of accurate information was usually the local reference librarian. And I’ve been wondering what librarians might say was the oddest question they’d ever been asked.

At a news conference with Rep. Peter Welch (left), Winooski Superintendent of Schools Sean McMannon said proposed cuts to federal education funding would hurt Winooski's summer education programs designed to help low-income families.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

At a federally funded summer program for Winooski children, Rep. Peter Welch said President Trump's proposed cuts to federal education programs highlight the fact that some elected officials in Washington have abandoned their fundamental duty to constituents.

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

In his six first months as Vermont attorney general, TJ Donovan has put a spotlight on the health insurance market and predatory college loans – policy issues that he says come down to consumer protection.

Dr. Elaine Collins, the current president of Johnson State College, will become president of the new Northern Vermont University on July 1.
Johnson State, Courtesy

Dr. Elaine Collins, current president of Johnson State College, will find herself in charge of a brand-new higher education institution called Northern Vermont University on July 1.

Lisa Rathke / Associated Press

Gov. Phil Scott and lawmakers finally compromised on the state budget last week, but the outcome creates a whole new set of financial dilemmas for school districts across Vermont. And the governor's veto of pot legalization disappointed supporters who thought it had a chance. We examine both controversies in a live interview with the governor.

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