Education

Henry Epp / VPR

After four school days on strike, Burlington teachers and the city's school board announced Tuesday evening they had reached a "tentative" deal that would allow classes to resume Wednesday.

Vermont's latest assessment scores showed a drop in math at every grade level tested and at all but two in English.
Lucentius / iStock

The report card is in, and we didn't do well. In the results from the 2016-17 Smarter Balanced Assessment test, Vermont students' average scores dropped at every grade level tested (3rd through 8th and 11th) in math and all but one grade in English.

Fran Brock, president of the Burlington Education Association, center, stands with picketing teachers outside Hunt Middle School Monday. Brock says elementary teachers need more time during the day to work with students, and develop lesson plans.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

A teacher strike that began last Thursday has emptied school classrooms in Vermont’s largest city, but the head of the Burlington teachers’ union says the walk-out isn’t about money or benefits.

Keeping kids with allergies away from certain foods is a serious business. We're talking about how schools handle the challenge.
jjpoole / iStock

Serious — potentially deadly — food allergies are on the rise among kids. We're looking at how schools manage these situations, with limited resources and a diverse population of children to keep educated and fed. 

Burlington schools were closed Friday for the second day in a row due to a teachers strike, but the district is trying to make a plan to allow some extracurricular activities to continue during the strike.

Teachers picketed outside the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes in Burlington on Sept. 14. A new bill to be considered during the 2018 session would prohibit teachers from striking in Vermont.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Teachers in Burlington are on strike this morning after the union and school board were unable to reach a contract agreement.

For teachers in some school districts around the state, these last few weeks have been not just back-to-school time but back-to-the-bargaining-table time.

In two of the state's largest communities - Burlington and South Burlington - negotiations between teachers and the school boards have hit snags. In Burlington, teachers have set a strike date for this Wednesday.

News 7 is a daily television show produced by journalism students at Lyndon State College which, when it officially merges with Johnson State College next July, will become Northern Vermont University.

Author Cindy Pierce says many of the college students she talks to say they feel lost and confused when trying to navigating the 'hookup' culture at school.
Courtesy

For college students, the first few months at school tend to be the most dangerous time for sexual assault — students are anxious, they may be drinking more and many may be struggling to navigate the sexualized "hookup culture" that can be found on many campuses.

It’s something author and sex educator Cindy Pierce says parents and students need to talk more about.

Burlington Education Association President Fran Brock, who teaches at Burlington High School, announced the union's decision to strike as teachers looked on after the union vote on Thursday, Sept. 7.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Burlington’s teachers’ union voted overwhelmingly to begin a strike next week if the school board doesn’t return to the bargaining table to negotiate a contract for the current school year.

Colleges are taking considerable heat these days. Some say they’re obsolete, since a degree won’t guarantee a high paying job at graduation. Others think they harbor spoiled, violent students who victimize speakers with whom they disagree.

The back-and-forth between Dartmouth faculty and College President Phil Hanlon continues over the school's response to comments by Mark Bray. Bray is a faculty member and has been a prominent speaker on the Antifa movement since the clashes in Charlottesville.

In a statement last month, President Hanlon distanced the college from Bray's comments around the role of violence in taking on white supremacy.

The U.S. Department of Education has approved Vermont's state plan required under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Dartmouth lecturer Mark Bray, who writes and speaks about the Antifa, has been under fire from Dartmouth College's President Philip J. Hanlon.
screenshot from C-SPAN video

Dartmouth faculty and President Philip Hanlon are at odds over one lecturer's controversial writings and media appearances about the Antifa, non-organized activists who say they oppose facism.

I know I’m not the only history teacher who’s been wrestling with profound doubts about what we’ve done or, perhaps, what we haven’t. Given the erosion of civility, even of rationality, and the increasing divisiveness that characterize our national discourse, we can’t avoid wondering if our work has been so poor that we’ve contributed to today’s civic chaos.

Vermont has a very high rate of special education students categorized as having an "emotional disturbance."
GlenJ / iStock

Special education departments across Vermont may have been using the wrong rules to guide decisions over what services children receive. That's because Agency of Education officials say the wrong draft of the state's special education rules were filed with the Secretary of State back in 2013.

UVM President Tom Sullivan at a 2013 news conference. Sullivan has led the university since 2012.
Toby Talbot / AP

Colleges and universities have been at the center of some controversial issues lately. We're talking with University of Vermont President  Tom Sullivan about these issues and how they play out at Vermont’s largest public university. 

A legislative committee has been meeting this summer to try to figure out how private schools that take public money should serve special education students.

The U.S. Department of Education says Vermont has to give more information about how the state will measure student progress under the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA.

What can educators do to help integrate refugees into their new communities? An associate professor at the University of Vermont will lead an effort to find out, thanks to a Fulbright award to conduct research on refugee integration in western Canada.

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