Education

The home for VPR's coverage of education issues and policy in Vermont.

The Education Team

Follow VPR reporters Amy Kolb Noyes and Howard Weiss-Tisman on Twitter for the latest on education issues across Vermont.

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Act 46 | Kids & Parenting | University Of Vermont | Vermont Legislature | Agency of Education

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Four Westford Elementary students gather around a table in the library.
Meg Malone / VPR

Westford Elementary School students have broken up into small groups, clustered around library tables — but in this case, the tables are figurative life rafts. The students are discovering a nearly-forgotten piece of history, as they dive into the nonfiction book Lost in the Pacific, 1942 by Vermont author Tod Olson.

Walk through the front door at Shawsheen Valley Technical High School in Billerica and the first thing you notice is security.

“Everyone who visits the building, when they come into this secure foyer, has to scan a driver’s license or another state-issued ID,” explains Superintendent Tim Broadrick. “It does kind of a high-level national background check.”

A Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student wears a March For Our Lives backpack
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

A group of Randolph Union High School students is going beyond the borders of Vermont and traveling to Washington, D.C., to take part in the national "March For Our Lives" event on Saturday. 

A team at Norwich University has designed a solar power supply system for use on Mars.
European Space Agency / Flickr

A five-member team of students from Norwich University won a prestigious design competition hosted by NASA.

"The Battle of the Greeks and Trojans for the Corpse of Patroclus" by Antoine Wiertz
Wikimedia Commons

The stories of The Iliad and The Odyssey are separated from us by a gap of thousands of years. But they continue to have relevance to those who have lived through modern warfare. We're connecting with a veterans-only class at UVM that's studying and discussing the works of Homer - and how those ancient epics resonate with today's warriors.

Craven: Student Activism

Mar 20, 2018

The sudden burgeoning of high school-driven youth activism, focused on issues of gun violence, reminds me of the 1963 Birmingham Alabama Children’s Crusade, which changed the course of history and moved President Kennedy to take a dramatic stand against racial segregation – in Alabama and elsewhere - which had until then stubbornly refused to yield.

Frank Amato / courtesy, Eagle Times

You can’t just walk into Springfield High School: There's a camera trained on the front door — which is locked — all part of the school's security plan. And that's just the beginning.

An empty school hallway with a row of lockers and a door at the end.
Halbergman / iStock

After the shooting in Parkland, Florida, and a threat of violence at Fair Haven Union High School, Gov. Phil Scott has called for safety assessments of Vermont's schools by the end of March. Scott has also requested $5 million over this year and next year to pay for security upgrades for schools.

“Build it and they will come” is the oft-misquoted meme from the classic movie Field of Dreams. And in the case of the proposal by CoreCivic, a private prison firm, to build and lease back to the State a 925-bed prison in Franklin County, this meme embodies the worst fears of the corrections reform movement.

According to campaign finance disclosures, Republican Gov. Phil Scott has raised more than twice as much money toward his 2018 reelection bid than any of the other four candidates challenging him for the office.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

In his second year in office, Gov. Phil Scott has called for limited spending and shared his change of heart on gun control laws. We're talking with the Governor about the surprises and changing priorities in Montpelier in 2018, and what he wants to accomplish in the rest of the legislative session.

Community members hold signs in favor of gun legislation in Brattleboro, Vt.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Historically young people haven’t had the best reputation: Teens have often been characterized as too busy texting and tweeting to be aware of or to engage in current events.

Allie Brown, a senior at Burlington High School, spoke at the rally. She urged her peers to call their state representatives about supporting a bill that would requre background checks for all gun purchases.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

While a number of planned walkouts were rescheduled Wednesday due to weather, rallies did take place across the state as part of a nationwide protest. 

Connecticut has spent over $50 million helping schools beef up security since 2013. Some of that money -- $3.2 million -- has gone to private schools, which are reimbursed at a higher rate than many public schools.

When you told your mom you loved her
before you caught the bus this morning
you meant it in the way a teenager means it
when they kiss their mother on the cheek,
cereal on their breath,
backpack on their shoulder,
head in a million places.

Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Students across the country and around Vermont are planning school walkouts and other protest actions Wednesday morning, March 14.

The House chamber of the Vermont Legislature
Angela Evancie / VPR/file

The Republican governor says the school budgets approved at town meetings last week are too high, and he wants the Legislature to intervene, by requiring districts to reduce spending. But a group of lawmakers say they have a better plan.

Castleton University President Karen Scolforo sits in the office she took over in December. Scolforo says she's optomistic the univeristy will be able to correct a budget deficit of $1.5 million the university is currently facing.
Nina Keck / VPR

When Castleton University announced last month it was facing a $1.5 million budget shortfall, it raised concerns in Rutland, where the college has expanded in recent years.

It seems every few weeks there is a hate crime reported on a college campus in New England. The groups that keep track of these kinds of incidents say there is, in fact, a marked increase in the number of racist slurs found scrawled on campus walls and an increase in white supremacist group activity.

About 100 people filled Tracy Hall in Norwich for an informational town meeting on Monday night.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

An overwhelming majority of school budgets passed on Town Meeting Day, but the Scott administration says those budgets need be cut back further and placed in the hands of state policymakers.

The job school superintendents love to hate is deciding on whether to close school or not in the winter.
Willowpix / iStock

There are two sides to school snow days. You've got the kids who get a day off and a chance to romp in the snow and catchup on the homework they might not have gotten done on time. And then there's the parents who might have to take a day off of work to watch the kids. But beyond that are the school superintendents who have to make the decision to close school.

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