Education

Women attend the second of five classes on home repair sponsored by NeighborWorks of Western Vermont. The course, which is taught by Morgan Overable, is geared especially for women.
Nina Keck / VPR

According to federal data, more single women are purchasing homes than single men. So a new how-to course in Rutland taught by – and designed for – women, is teaching students how to tackle the basics of home repair.

Campers at Zeno Mountain Farms spend a month living in wheelchair-accessible tree houses, performing, making films and taking care of one another.
Jon Kalish / For VPR

Every summer adults living with developmental disabilities and their able-bodied friends spend a month on Zeno Mountain in Lincoln, Vermont, living in wheelchair-accessible tree houses and caring for one-another.

Musicians and child care advocates gathered at a Burlington recording studio last week to work on the arrangement for 'Something Beautiful'. Shown here, from the left, are Chris Dorman, Anna Gebhardt, Kat Wright, Bob Wagner and Josh Weinstein.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

If all goes as organizers plan, a 1,000-person flash mob will be singing and dancing on Church Street in Burlington October 1 in support of adequate early childhood care for Vermont's kids.

The town of Vernon voted Tuesday to leave the Brattleboro Union High School district.

Gov. Phil Scott says it would be possible to avoid a statewide property tax increase by mandating a higher student to staff ratio
skynesher / iStock

Vermont still has a lot of work to do to fully integrate technology into public school classrooms, according to the latest draft of the state's digital learning plan, put out by the Agency of Education.

With all the talk in the news today about alternative facts and untrue statements, I’ve been reminded that before Google and Wikipedia, the best source of accurate information was usually the local reference librarian. And I’ve been wondering what librarians might say was the oddest question they’d ever been asked.

At a news conference with Rep. Peter Welch (left), Winooski Superintendent of Schools Sean McMannon said proposed cuts to federal education funding would hurt Winooski's summer education programs designed to help low-income families.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

At a federally funded summer program for Winooski children, Rep. Peter Welch said President Trump's proposed cuts to federal education programs highlight the fact that some elected officials in Washington have abandoned their fundamental duty to constituents.

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

In his six first months as Vermont attorney general, TJ Donovan has put a spotlight on the health insurance market and predatory college loans – policy issues that he says come down to consumer protection.

Dr. Elaine Collins, the current president of Johnson State College, will become president of the new Northern Vermont University on July 1.
Johnson State, Courtesy

Dr. Elaine Collins, current president of Johnson State College, will find herself in charge of a brand-new higher education institution called Northern Vermont University on July 1.

Lisa Rathke / Associated Press

Gov. Phil Scott and lawmakers finally compromised on the state budget last week, but the outcome creates a whole new set of financial dilemmas for school districts across Vermont. And the governor's veto of pot legalization disappointed supporters who thought it had a chance. We examine both controversies in a live interview with the governor.

Eleven year old Katherine Stevens, right, and nine year old Austin Anderson, listen to arguments in Vermont Superior Court, in Hyde Park, Oct. 22, 1997. The two children were part of a lawsuit challenging Act 60, by schoolchildren in Stowe.
Toby Talbot / AP

Twenty years ago, Act 60 reshaped Vermont's education system. Designed to tackle inequality in education spending among towns, the legislation divided communities and made national headlines. Vermont Edition looks back at that debate, and at Act 60's legacy in today's battles over education and equity.

Skylar White, 18, of Chester, says she was raped by Ryan Stocker, a fellow student at Green Mountain Union High School. Stocker was arrested last week and charged with two counts of sexual assault.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Like a lot of recent graduates, Skylar White, of Chester, is thinking about her future: about her upcoming gap year in Brazil and about what it might to be like to come back to her tiny community after living abroad.
 
White didn't think she'd be talking about sexual assault in these waning days of high school.

The issue of whether to levy a tax on carbon pollution hasn't gained much traction yet in Montpelier. Vermont Businesses for Social Responsiblity is trying to broaden support for the concept.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Lawmakers could have overridden two vetoes when they returned to Montpelier on Wednesday. The governor's veto of a pot legalization bill stands, but legislators did strike a deal to approve the state budget. However, their compromise with Gov. Phil Scott puts school boards on the hook to find cost savings.

Vermont Law School, Courtesy

Brittmy Martinez, a rising second-year student at Vermont Law School, is one of three VLS students recently named to the National Black Law Students Association's executive board. She is the chief of staff of NBLSA. 

Districts that have already negotiated employee health care plans, like the one that includes Stowe Middle and High School, will face some tough financial choices as a result of the budget compromise in Montpelier.
Ian Noyes / For VPR

Democratic lawmakers and Republican Gov. Phil Scott finally got a budget compromise on Wednesday, but in doing so, they’ve created a whole new set of financial dilemmas for school districts across Vermont.

Title IX has been a federal law since 1972. We look at what progress women have made on campus and in business because of the law.
Stockce / iStock

On June 23, 1972, Title IX went into effect, mandating the equal treatment of all students, regardless of gender, in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. So how much have education and professional opportunities for women improved in that time?

Gov. Phil Scott and legislative leaders announced details of a compromise Wednesday that will require school districts across Vermont to cut spending by $13 million over the next two years.
Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / Times Argus

School districts across Vermont will be forced to reduce spending by $13 million over the next two years as part of a compromise in Montpelier that has cleared the political logjam holding up passage of the state budget.

South Burlington High School and Milton Middle School have both had rocky conversations about race and inclusion during this school year.
BeholdingEye / iStock

A few recent highly publicized racial incidents at schools have left some Vermonters unsettled, but minority communities say racial bias in schools is an everyday experience, not an outlier. Vermont Edition looks at what Vermont schools should do to address racism.

Frustrated with the stance taken by the Vermont School Board Association on issues like Act 46 and statewide teacher health care negotiations,some school board members have taken the step of forming a new group. It's called the Alliance of Vermont School Board Members.

A deal between Democratic lawmakers and the Scott administration has paved the way for passage of critical budget and tax bills.
Doug Kerr / Flickr

A tentative compromise between Democratic lawmakers and Republican Gov. Phil Scott over the issue of teacher health benefits appears to have resolved a weeks-long political standoff that had threatened passage of the budget and a key tax bill.

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