Education

The home for VPR's coverage of education issues and policy in Vermont.

The Education Team

Follow VPR reporters Amy Kolb Noyes and Howard Weiss-Tisman on Twitter for the latest on education issues across Vermont.

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Act 46 | Kids & Parenting | University Of Vermont | Vermont Legislature | Agency of Education

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Between two historic monitor barns in Richmond lies a working farm run by the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. The farm is home to the Health Care Share, a CSA that's free to Vermonters experiencing food insecurity and diet-related illness.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This time of year, many Vermonters are thinking about signing up for a CSA share at their local farm. Meanwhile, the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps is getting ready to supply a different type of Community Supported Agriculture – one you pick up at a doctor's office.

Facing a $58 million funding gap, Vermont lawmakers and the governor have competing proposals to pay for Vermont's schools in the final weeks of the legislative session.
Miatagirl / iStock

Legislative leaders say they will stick to the schedule for continuing the Act 46 school district consolidation process.

Sheldon Elementary School

Last year, Ed Kolnaski asked his seventh-grade humanities students to come up with projects that would help their community.

Vermont's small colleges and universities face growing challenges as enrollment drops across the state and region.
Photobuay / iStock

College enrollment is down across New England. We're looking at how Vermont's small private and state colleges are adjusting to fewer students, rising costs, and growing competition for tuition dollars.

Desks in a line in an empty classroom. Up close of one with books in it.
GlobalStock / iStock

Gov. Phil Scott said in a letter to the State Board of Education that experience with the public school system should "not necessarily" be a requirement for Vermont’s next secretary of education.

An empty school hallway with a row of lockers and a door at the end.
Halbergman / iStock

In light of recent school shootings, there’s been a renewed push for more gun control and more mental health care. And while Vermont lawmakers have passed gun control measures, mental health experts say the problem is more complex than simply more resources.

courtesy, Herve Pelletier

It was a busy morning in Windham County, as two communities tackled the issue of guns in schools.

A screenshot of the Agency of Education's Merger Activity map. See the latest merger map here: https://bit.ly/2pMFZ3E
Screenshot, Vermont Agency of Education

Rebecca Holcombe’s announcement Tuesday that she’ll be stepping down as Vermont’s Secretary of Education comes at a critical time in the Act 46 school district consolidation process.

A Drug Free School Zone sign on a chain link fence with a playground in the background.
duckycards / iStock

As the state continues to battle the opioid abuse crisis, ways of fighting it have taken many different forms — including focusing on drug prevention strategies in our schools.

On this Vermont Edition, we look around the state to learn what's being done to deliver that anti-drug message to our kids and also look at the effectiveness of these efforts.

Headshot of Vermont Education Secretary Rebecca Holcome pictured in 2014.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

After a four-year tenure in which she oversaw one of the most substantial school-governance overhauls in state history, Vermont Secretary of Education Rebecca Holcombe is departing state government.

Four Westford Elementary students gather around a table in the library.
Meg Malone / VPR

Westford Elementary School students have broken up into small groups, clustered around library tables — but in this case, the tables are figurative life rafts. The students are discovering a nearly-forgotten piece of history, as they dive into the nonfiction book Lost in the Pacific, 1942 by Vermont author Tod Olson.

Walk through the front door at Shawsheen Valley Technical High School in Billerica and the first thing you notice is security.

“Everyone who visits the building, when they come into this secure foyer, has to scan a driver’s license or another state-issued ID,” explains Superintendent Tim Broadrick. “It does kind of a high-level national background check.”

A Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student wears a March For Our Lives backpack
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

A group of Randolph Union High School students is going beyond the borders of Vermont and traveling to Washington, D.C., to take part in the national "March For Our Lives" event on Saturday. 

A team at Norwich University has designed a solar power supply system for use on Mars.
European Space Agency / Flickr

A five-member team of students from Norwich University won a prestigious design competition hosted by NASA.

"The Battle of the Greeks and Trojans for the Corpse of Patroclus" by Antoine Wiertz
Wikimedia Commons

The stories of The Iliad and The Odyssey are separated from us by a gap of thousands of years. But they continue to have relevance to those who have lived through modern warfare. We're connecting with a veterans-only class at UVM that's studying and discussing the works of Homer - and how those ancient epics resonate with today's warriors.

Craven: Student Activism

Mar 20, 2018

The sudden burgeoning of high school-driven youth activism, focused on issues of gun violence, reminds me of the 1963 Birmingham Alabama Children’s Crusade, which changed the course of history and moved President Kennedy to take a dramatic stand against racial segregation – in Alabama and elsewhere - which had until then stubbornly refused to yield.

Frank Amato / courtesy, Eagle Times

You can’t just walk into Springfield High School: There's a camera trained on the front door — which is locked — all part of the school's security plan. And that's just the beginning.

An empty school hallway with a row of lockers and a door at the end.
Halbergman / iStock

After the shooting in Parkland, Florida, and a threat of violence at Fair Haven Union High School, Gov. Phil Scott has called for safety assessments of Vermont's schools by the end of March. Scott has also requested $5 million over this year and next year to pay for security upgrades for schools.

“Build it and they will come” is the oft-misquoted meme from the classic movie Field of Dreams. And in the case of the proposal by CoreCivic, a private prison firm, to build and lease back to the State a 925-bed prison in Franklin County, this meme embodies the worst fears of the corrections reform movement.

According to campaign finance disclosures, Republican Gov. Phil Scott has raised more than twice as much money toward his 2018 reelection bid than any of the other four candidates challenging him for the office.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

In his second year in office, Gov. Phil Scott has called for limited spending and shared his change of heart on gun control laws. We're talking with the Governor about the surprises and changing priorities in Montpelier in 2018, and what he wants to accomplish in the rest of the legislative session.

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