Emerald Ash Borer

U.S. Department of Agriculture

The emerald ash borer has been detected in Grand Isle County. It’s the latest confirmation of the presence of the damaging insect in Vermont.

The emerald ash borer, an invasive insect, kills over 99 percent of ash trees. It's been found in Montpelier, and officials are planning a response.
U.S. Department of Agriculture

The invasive emerald ash borer has been found in Montpelier. City officials are taking steps to protect some trees along city streets, but ultimately they say most of Montpelier’s ash trees will die.

Mike Groll / AP

Earlier this week, two more Vermont counties confirmed the presence of the emerald ash borer. The invasive species is known for causing devastation to millions of ash trees around the country.

The emerald ash borer, an invasive insect, kills over 99 percent of ash trees. It's been found in Montpelier, and officials are planning a response.
U.S. Department of Agriculture

A long-expected, but still dreaded, moment has arrived. The emerald ash borer, a tree-killing insect that has decimated forests in other parts of the country, has finally been officially confirmed in Vermont. We’re talking to experts about what comes next and what can be done to mitigate the damage from these invasive pests.

Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources

It’s been a matter of ‘when’, not ‘if’: For years state officials have been expecting the destructive emerald ash borer to turn up in Vermont. Tuesday, the state announced it has found an infestation of the insect in part of the town of Orange.

Flickr/Heathzib

The emerald ash borer hasn't been spotted in Vermont yet, but it's getting closer. The little green beetle has destroyed ash tree populations in Ohio and Michigan, and has chewed its way across the Midwest to New England.

Some landowners worry they should cut their ash trees now, before the pest arrives. We'll talk to Michael Snyder, Commissioner of Vermont Forests Parks and Recreation, to find out what you, and the state, can do to prepare.