Enviroment

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two years ago, then Gov. Peter Shumlin signed Vermont's most comprehensive clean water law. Now, many of the and a lot of the regulations included in that law are coming into play.

A tree downed on a powerline in Monkton, Vermont. Thousands of homes and buisnesses have been without power since wind storms hit the region on Sunday.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Every year, electric utilities clear trees and vegetation around power lines. With several thousand homes and business in Vermont still without power after Sunday's windstorm, could more clearing prevented these lengthy outages?

Molnar: Land And Lens

Oct 31, 2017
Photographer: Richard Misrach (b. 1949 ) / Middlebury College Museum of Art

To paraphrase an old saying about the power of art, a photo exhibit at Middlebury College Museum of Art demonstrates that the camera can sometimes be mightier than the keyboard.

Conservation biologist Kent McFarland spoke with "Vermont Edition" about the robust number of box elder bugs currently populating the state.
Renman1605 / iStock

For those of you who have been shocked by huge clusters of bugs that are graphite in color with red piping, fear not. It's just a little box elder bug invasion.

Blue-green algae blooms, like this one photographed in the summer of 2014 in Lake Champlain, have many in the state concerned. A new draft plan proposes funding sources for water cleanup efforts.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR FILE

Lake Champlain and Lake Carmi saw numerous outbreaks of blue-green algae blooms this summer, which seems to have rallied support for clean water efforts in the state. But the age-old question of how to fund those efforts persists.

My compost pile sits west of the garden and consists of two ripening mounds of table scraps, grass clippings, and hand-pulled weeds that I turn from time to time.

This plant is commonly call self-heals, and it refers to plants in the genus Prunella. Herbalist Stephanie Cohen says it can treat skin and digestive issues.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

To prevent their collective cultural knowledge about medicinal plants from disappearing, some Vermont tribal nations are sharing their expertise with those outside the native communities.

With over half of the state using septic systems, we talk with experts about how to keep yours operating properly.
BlakeDavidTaylor / iStock

We know it's not your favorite subject. But over half of the state has to deal with them. Yes, your septic system.

A new wave of forest loss is underway in New England, at a rate of 65 acres a day. That's the conclusion of a new regionwide study spearheaded by a Harvard University forest research group. And the authors say New England could lose more than a million acres of forest cover over the next half-century.