Environment

A new study shows that even a small amount of development around a lake can put the body of water at risk of salinization.
Wilson Ring / Associated Press

Here in the north country, we spread a lot of salt on our roadways to melt the ice that causes hazardous winter driving conditions. But that salt has to go somewhere.  Flora Krivak-Tetley, a PhD student in Biology at Dartmouth College, is part of a group of researchers with the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network that has been taking a look at how salt is affecting waterbodies from Maine to the Midwest.

Courtesy: Vt. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

A flowering plant thought to be extinct in Vermont has been rediscovered.

Winged loosestrife is a native plant related to the non-native invasive purple loosestrife.

Ted Levin

Sitting on my desk at home is a small vial of alcohol containing three pickled, blacklegged tick nymphs, each no bigger than the period at the end of a typed sentence… three tiny alarming arachnids.

The company that contaminated about 270 private wells in Bennington has dropped its pending lawsuits against the state over Vermont's safe drinking water standard for PFOA.

Aaron Brooke-deBock

A researcher at Middlebury College says the tick population has doubled, and in Rutland county the mosquito count is up by 30 percent. But down in southern Vermont there's an historic infestation of fungus gnats.

Middlebury College researchers have found that areas below 1,000 feet of elevation have 10 to 15 times the amount of ticks then at higher elevations.
SteveEllington / iStock

For such a wee little thing, the tick has sure garnered a lot of our attention. That's because it can carry Lyme disease and that's something none of us wants to experience.

Gov. Phil Scott announced Tuesday that the state has reached a settlement with the company Saint-Gobain over the water contamination in Bennington.

A Hardwick log yard in 2004.
AP Photo/Toby Talbot

We hear a lot about Vermont's agricultural economy, but what about our working forests? Trees  cover more than 75 percent of Vermont. In past years the state's forest products industry has supported loggers, truckers and mills but its in decline and jobs and markets have been disappearing.

Stokes with his record-breaking fish.
Courtesy: Vt. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

One of Vermont's most accomplished anglers is 11-year-old Chase Stokes of Ferrisburgh, who recently entered the record books for a carp he caught in Otter Creek.

As Kevin Sullivan slowly rumbles his pickup truck across his 60 acres of property near the Connecticut-Massachusetts border, he leans in and asks a question: What’s farmland?

The gloved hand of a biologist holds a little brown bat in Vermont.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

Stand outside at night and you might glimpse the swift, darting profile of a bat flying overhead. That sight wasn't rare in the past, but bats in this region have had it rough for years due to white-nose syndrome, and biologists are still working to understand and protect these tiny flying mammals.

Catamount Solar is installing an 8.7 kilowatt system in a homeowner's yard in East Montpelier. Kestrel Marcel of Catamount Solar is connecting the optimizers, which are a converter technology that helps maximize the energy harvested from the panels.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

After years of encouraging solar development, Vermont seems to be attracting the attention of national solar companies.

Alyssa Bennett, a small mammal biologist with the Vermont Fish And Wildlife Department, shows the difference in size between the Little Brown Bat and the Big Brown Bat.
Kent McFarland, courtesy / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

A bat will eat about half its weight in insects on a summer night, and it can live more than 30 years. That's a lot of insects! But unfortunately, the disease called white-nose syndrome has taken a huge toll on Vermont's bat population.

A new type of energy-efficient construction is drawing attention in the U.S. It’s called “passive housing” -- residences built to achieve ultra-low energy use. It’s so efficient that developers can eliminate central heating systems altogether.

Men panning for gold in an 1887 photograph from the Plymouth Historical Society.
E. G. Davis / Plymouth Historical Society, courtesy

You've probably heard about the California gold rush of 1849 — but did you know that Vermont had its own mini-gold rush beginning around that same time?

Wildlife biologist David Sausville of Vermont Fish and Wildlife holds a Canada goose before it gets inspected and banded. Every summer the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife asks the public to help round up resident Canada geese.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Have you ever caught a wild goose? Well, every year Vermont Fish and Wildlife invites the public to do just that, helping them corral wild Canada geese in order to record and band the birds.

Charlie Hohn

The flow from the July 1st downpour had jumped two streambeds and overwhelmed two culverts, trisecting Thetford’s Five Corners Road into three unequal lengths, scouring out a pair of nearly forty-foot wide spillways into the woods. It had left skirts of debris fixed to tree trunks and draped from low limbs, some more than a foot above the ground.

The spent nuclear fuel at Vermont Yankee is being stored in dry casks on the property in Vernon.
Vermont Yankee, Courtesy

A company that specializes in the dismantling of nuclear reactors says it's signed a contract to take down Vermont Yankee in Vernon.

Turnpike Road in Norwich was damaged during flash flooding this past summer. VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman spoke to "Vermont Edition" about his recent stories looking at flood insurance.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

The rain keeps coming and flash floods have caused a lot of infrastructure damage around Vermont, so much so that the state is applying for federal aid. Vermont Edition explains the extent of the damage and how towns, the state and the federal government will sort out the repairs.

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

In his six first months as Vermont attorney general, TJ Donovan has put a spotlight on the health insurance market and predatory college loans – policy issues that he says come down to consumer protection.

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