Featured Programs

Young Writers Project: 'Fairytales'

Apr 13, 2018
Student-writer Rebecca Orten of Middlebury gives a nod to the outdated archetype of the damsel in distress and flips the point of view. She shows us her interpretation of the hardships faced by these spirited women of our favorite childhood stories.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Hazel Civalier, 15, Burlington, VT

They called her rose, briar rose.
But when she bloomed, they cowered.
She raised her voice, her petals to the sun,
and stained scarlet much more than her lips.
So they put her to sleep.

They called her sunshine,
and swathed her in golden curls.
But when she shone, their eyes blistered,
and when she burned, they couldn't see through the smoke.
So they locked her in a tower.

Before producing fruit, the Corneilian cherry tree comes alive in spring with brilliant yellow blooms that birds and bees are fond of.
Clement Peiffer / iStock

I just finished pruning my cherry trees. While I love the taste of the sweet and tart cherries, there are a few other cherries to consider for your yard.

Young Writers Project: 'Stories From Israel'

Apr 6, 2018
Young Writers Project Photo Library, photo by Sophie Dauerman

Big plane, big wings,
and small seats,
jammed together
like packing peanuts in a moving box.
Sweaty thighs sticking,
and long nights of flight-map watching.

Similar to these traditional raised beds, a keyhole raised bed not only gets you gardening sooner in spring, but also saves space.
mtreasure / iStock

It's time to start thinking about your vegetable garden. Many gardeners have transitioned from flat, straight rows to raised beds. Raised beds warm up faster in spring, drain water sooner and allow you to garden more intensively without as much work. But the next level of raised beds is the keyhole bed.

Young Writers Project: 'Dear Stephen Hawking'

Mar 30, 2018
YWP Photo Library, photo by Hanna Gustafson, South Burlington, Vermont

Dear Mr. Hawking,
I'm sorry I didn't do this on Wednesday.
You died on Wednesday.
Albert Einstein’s birthday, to be precise.

A chocolate pig with tiny chocolate piglets inside is just one of the many Easter novelties created by chocolatier, Pier Normandeau, at L'Oeuf in Mystic, QC.
Sally Pollak / Seven Days

There's a little place north of the border that makes you feel as though you've been transported to a small, French village. A Québécois Brigadoon, if you will. It's called L'Oeuf - a French country restaurant and chocolate shop where chocolate takes center stage this time of year.  

David Gomez, istockphoto.com

I was on a roll in early March pruning my fruits. Then it snowed, got cold and I retreated to the cozy fire. But my blueberries still need pruning and once the snow melts, I'll be back at it.

Conor Lastowka has written funny things about awful movies for the better part of a dozen years. He works for the comedy website, Rifftrax. Lastowka has just written his second comedy sci-fi novel.
Conor Lastowka

Burlington writer Conor Lastowka has just written his second comedy sci-fi novel, called The Pole Vault Championship of the Entire Universe. The book follows 15-year-old Kara, whose grandfather returns from the dead to recruit Kara to be a mascot for his Olympics team on a micro-nation founded through a series of devious acts. And there are alien garbagemen...

Young Writers Project: 'Home'

Mar 26, 2018
Richmond, Vermont, student Leo Powers renews our appreciation for the outside world. He expands on the idea of Mother Nature as a grand and beautiful force, to describe her also as a place: his home.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Abigail Harkness, Shelburne, Vermont

One thing I know for sure
is that I’ll always have a home. Always.
Never will I find her farther away
than one step outside the door.
I have only to cross a threshold
before entering a beautiful new world.

A Vermont storyteller, a new venue for a decades-old film fest, a call to young artists and more await your social calendar this weekend and beyond!

Chicken dumplings (pictured) served at Double King, a Chinese food pop-up at Montpelier's Kismet restaurant.
Hannah Palmer Egan / Seven Days

From traditional Chinese food restaurants to Asian fusion, from buffets to pop-ups, it all can be found scattered throughout Vermont. In this episode, Seven Days food writer Hannah Palmer Egan shares a few of her favorites.

An essential oil bottle next to lavender flowers laying down on a surface.
Amy_Lv / iStock

The name "lavender" comes from the Latin word meaning "to wash" — referring to the Mediterranean herb's use in baths, beds and clothing. Its oil is used medicinally as an antibacterial, anti-convulsive, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatic. Queen Victoria even used it to soothe her nerves. This herb also adds a slightly sweet flavor to breads, soups, salads and desserts — and it can be grown here in Vermont!

Writing about writing is no piece of cake as South Burlington student and member of Muslim Girls Making Change (MGMC), Kiran Waqar pens a personal essay comparing the creative process to a slice of cake.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Ella Larson, Essex Junction

The dark, decorated exterior of the ganache-glazed chocolate cake tempted me as I imagined the rich taste I would experience with my first bite. I imagined the enthusiasm of my taste buds as they encountered the ornamented maraschino cherries sprinkled amongst the dollops of buttercream frosting.

Author Olivia Hoblitzelle heard a phrase in her 40s that influenced the way she embraced her own aging and those around her. Now at age 80, her book collects her reflections and stories on how to age well.
Courtesy, Olivia Hoblitzelle

Olivia Hoblitzelle has spent her career as a teacher, a therapist and a writer. Her lifelong work brought together the practices of meditation, cognitive therapy and yoga into Western medicine's domain. And now Hoblitzelle's most recent book, Aging With Wisdom: Reflections, Stories & Teachings, gathers her writing into focused pieces on how to age well.

Young Writers Project: 'Piano Man'

Mar 9, 2018
Maisie Newbury, 17, of Weybridge, shares the tale of an aging piano player imparting uncondescending wisdom upon a younger generation.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Neelie Markley, Burlington

He spoke about the news stories.
But it was in a different sort of way,
making unspeakable tragedies
a little easier to say.

Looking to see a film about Vermont's natural history and take in a concert or two of bluegrass and folk, plus catch a play about a beloved character from literature? We've got you covered!

Young Writers Project: 'February 21, 2018'

Mar 2, 2018
 Senior Ben Stoll writes about his personal experience with school violence this past February at Bellows Free Academy, St. Albans.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Kassidy Mannings, Essex Junction, Vermont

PRESS RELEASE:

This episode was originally broadcast in August 2017: Michelle Wallace, who owns Nature Mandala Art :: Vermont, spoke to VPR about the process and intention behind her artwork. Wallace creates mandala patterns out of natural materials, photographs them and then allows the mandala to be taken away by the wind.

Courtesy, Don and Vickie Herzberg

This weekend, you can see etchings and hear poetry, see a movie that was lauded at the Sundance Film Festival and hear works for piano and voice, composed by Beethoven.

 Anna Phelps, 15, of Wolcott, Vermont, offers a glimpse into the daily life of a student tormented by bullies.
YWP Photo Library, photo by Courtney Volk, Essex Junction, Vermont

Day 1 of 7:

They were listening through the cracks in the wall.
I could hear them whispering,
giggling at the snorts from my nose.

Such a cry baby.
She'll never know we're here.
Completely oblivious to everything.

I wonder if they knew
I was crying over them.

Day 2 of 7:

I always cry discreetly after Spanish.
It's a given.
They knew that.

The course isn't even that hard.
She just wants attention.
She must have been raised by storm clouds or something.

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