Government & Politics

Sen. Bernie Sanders says he will announce his re-election plans on Monday
Charlie Neibergall / AP

On Monday, Sen. Bernie Sanders is expected to announce plans to seek a third term in the U.S. Senate. But Sanders says he also intends to actively campaign this summer and fall for a number of Democratic candidates across the country.

U.S. Border Patrol agent Richard Ross near the international border along Lake Memphremagog.
Lorne Matalon / VPR

Over the first weekend in April, U.S. Border Patrol agents arrested 20 people for entering the country illegally in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York.

Then-Sen. Phil Scott, right, takes then-Sen. Bill Doyle for a racecar drive back in June 2001. Both have helmets on, Doyle is smiling and giving a thumbs up.
Alden Pellett / Associated Press

The longest serving state senator in Vermont history has now retired from his day job.

After teaching political science at Johnson State College for 60 years, former state Sen. Bill Doyle retired earlier this month.

Gov. Phil Scott has called for a special session to resolve the budget standoff in Montpelier.
John Dillon / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott has called lawmakers back to Montpelier for a special session next week to resolve the standoff over the state budget and property tax rates. We're convening a roundtable of political reporters to discuss what might happen next.

The Vermont Supreme Court building in Montpelier turns 100 years old this year.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

This year, the building that holds the Vermont Supreme Court turns 100. On Friday, state officials will celebrate that anniversary.

Sen. Bernie Sanders raises his hand during a Senate Committee on Veteran Affairs hearing
Jose Luis Magana / Associated Press

Sen. Bernie Sanders says he'll formally announce his re-election plans next week and says he has more to accomplish as a U.S. senator.

If Scott Pruitt arrived on Capitol Hill expecting to be grilled Wednesday, he did not have to wait long to see that expectation fulfilled.

The international border between Quebec, on the right, and the U.S. in Derby Line, Vermont. As the nation focuses on the southern border with Mexico, some people are concerned about the potential for terrorism coming to the U.S. from the northern border.
Lorne Matalon / VPR

Along the northern border where Vermont, New Hampshire and New York meet Canada, U.S. Customs and Border Protection pilot Gerhardt Perry routinely flies an infrared camera-equipped Cessna 206 on patrols that can last up to four hours.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Representatives from small schools across Vermont attended the State Board of Education meeting in Rutland on Wednesday to try to convince the board not to change the state’s Small School Grants program.

Lawmakers gathered in the Senate at the kickoff of the biennium in 2017. Now, lawmakers will return for a special session next week.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

Lawmakers and the Scott administration remain in a standoff after the state budget was passed with broad support from the legislature. Now, the governor has said he will call lawmakers back to a special session next week. VPR's Peter Hirschfeld joined Vermont Edition to talk about what happens next in Montpelier.

To my mind, the passing of Vermont Life Magazine is a sad and sobering cultural milestone.

I grew up reading Vermont Life in the fifties and continued reading it until shortly after the turn of the century.

Lawmakers adjourned the legislative session on Saturday, but they'll be back in Montpelier soon to try to resolve a budget impasse with Gov. Phil Scott.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Gov. Phil Scott says he'll call lawmakers back to Montpelier for a special session next Wednesday, but the budget impasse between the Republican governor and Democratic lawmakers shows no signs of letting up.

 Aaron Shepard of the Northwest Vermont Solid Waste District empties food scrap buckets on the district's  residential collection route. While some haulers have begun to collect food scraps a  bill delays a requirement that every hauler offer the service.
Melody Bodette / VPR

Lawmakers have decided to put off a requirement to have solid waste haulers pick up food scraps from in front of residential homes in 2018.

Marijuana seeds (left), a young marijuana plant (center), and a mature flowering marijuana plant. Cultivating a limited number of mature plants will be legal in Vermont on July 1, but getting started raises legal questions.
Wikimedia

Starting July 1, Vermonters 21 and older can legally posses an ounce of marijuana and cultivate a small number of the plants. But marijuana sales and distribution remain illegal under state law, so if you're interested, how can you get the seeds to get started? We're talking about how to legally start growing under Vermont's marijuana laws.

Sonja Bullaty and Angelo Lomeo / Reproduced with permission from Vermont Life

Vermont Life Magazine was founded in 1946 to attract visitors by celebrating the state’s culture and natural beauty.

The Public Utility Commission held the final hearing on the sale of the Vermont Yankee plant as a witness testified by video the deal still is risky for the public and th environment.
John Dillon / VPR

Hearings on the sale of the closed Vermont Yankee nuclear plant ended on Monday as a witness for an environmental group testified the deal lacks protections for the public.

Gov. Phil Scott says he is confident Democratic leaders will drop their plan to raise the statewide property tax rate to avoid a government shutdown on July first
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott says he's confident that he'll be able to reach an agreement with Democratic leaders in an upcoming Special Session over the issue of education spending. But Scott says raising property tax rates will definitely not be part of any agreement.

An issue of "Vermont Life" magazine on a table.
Henry Epp / VPR File

Days after the state announced Vermont Life magazine would end print publication, the people who hoped to continue the magazine are shaking their heads.

The minimum wage bill passed by the legislature would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. The current minimum wage is $10.50 an hour.
Photo by Angela Evancie, illustration by Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

The Vermont legislature has passed a bill that would raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. But Gov. Scott has opposed the legislation and it's a target for a veto. We're talking about what's in the bill and the debate over how it would impact the state's businesses and low-income workers.

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