Government & Politics

Angela Evancie / VPR file

Rain or shine, local scientists and supporters say they will be turning out in multiple locations in Vermont—and across the country— to speak up for science on Saturday.

Nina Keck / VPR

A fatal hit-and-run incident in Tinmouth last year has the community frustrated over what some are calling lack of accountability and punishment for the alleged offender.

The Vermont Senate passed a bill legalizing marijuana Friday in a 21-9 vote, but that doesn't mean the path is clear for legal marijuana in this state.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

The 2017 legislative session is winding down. What initiatives will become top priorities in the final few weeks before adjournment?

Rumble Strip: Helping Your Best Friend Die

Apr 20, 2017
When Bill Morancy was diagnosed with terminal cancer, he turned to his best friend to help him die.
courtesy of Erica Heilman

When Bill Morancy was diagnosed with terminal cancer, he called on his best friend, Rob Mermin, to help him die.

FotografiaBasica / iStock.com

As Vermont’s demographic profile undergoes a potentially dramatic shift over the next decade or two, analysts in state government are trying give policymakers a more precise glimpse at what the population is going to look like in the future.

The use of online communication to advance social causes has created some clever new words, like clicktivsm – the signing of online petitions to feel part of social change.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

An education bill that's being debated in the Vermont Statehouse could raise some separation of power issues between the legislative and executive branches.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott says that after 100 days in office, he’s already transforming culture in state government and bringing needed fiscal restraint to the state budget. But the new Republican executive is still struggling to bring the Legislature on board with some of his most sweeping proposals.

The State Board of Education is going to ask the Legislature to put money aside so the board can hire paid staff members to tackle an ever-growing list of education priorities.

Toby Talbot / AP file

An apparent clerical error by the administration of former Gov. Peter Shumlin has jeopardized the tenure of one of his highest-profile appointments to the Green Mountain Care Board.

Rebecca Sananes / VPR

Rep. Peter Welch met with leaders of social service nonprofits in the Upper Valley on Monday to talk about how President Trump's proposed budget would affect the area.

Toby Talbot / AP File

President Donald Trump doesn’t have many allies on the political left, but on one issue Democratic Rep. Peter Welch says he sees Trump as a well-informed and energetic ally.

Lauren Victoria Burke / AP

Congress is on a two-week recess when many members are in their districts to hear from  constituents about major issues facing the country.  Vermont's sole congressional representative, Democrat Peter Welch, talks with VPR's Bob Kinzel and takes questions from Vermonters.

Hilary Niles / VPR

The firm Raymond James & Associates has agreed to pay $150 million as part of a settlement announced by state officials late Thursday.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

House lawmakers have given final approval to legislation that would update the state’s fair and impartial policing policies, and create a new 15-person board to oversee racial justice issues in Vermont.

Rebecca Sananes / VPR

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen has been speaking out about the importance of the Northern Border Regional Commission.

Almost without exception, efforts to legalize marijuana in the U.S. involve citizens of an area making the choice for their elected officials by way of constitutional referendum. Vermont’s constitution doesn’t allow for that kind of ballot initiative approach.

Steven Senne / AP

Tuesday, Sen. Bernie Sanders sent an email to supporters asking them to make contributions to support a seven-state tour. The email also indicated for the first time that Sanders’ will seek re-election to a third term in the U.S. Senate.

At first Vermont and Mississippi don’t appear to have much in common, but a recent report notes that they’re the only two states who’ve never sent a woman to Congress. Released by South Burlington-based Change the Story last week, Vermont Women and Leadership is the fourth in a series of studies related to women’s economic status in the Green Mountain State.

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