Government & Politics

An OxyContin bottle with pills arranged around it.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

Vermont has became the latest state to file suit against Purdue Pharma, the Connecticut-based drugmaker that manufactures the opioid painkiller OxyContin.

The way villains are portrayed in fiction may help shape political views. We're talking about that, and other ways that entertainment can affect ideology.
Roger Murmann / flickr

Our politics and ideology are shaped by our upbringing and life experience, but a UVM political scientist says there may be another key component to what we believe and who we vote for: the fictional stories we're exposed to in books, movies, and television. We're talking about how entertainment can shape our politics - from Game of Thrones to House of Cards and The Hunger Games

Charles Dharapak / Associated Press

I met John McCain several times. In fact, in 2008 I spent January in New Hampshire campaigning for him - hard.

Bill Schubart

I love working in the woods and I’ve come to know all the great trees on our land. They’re like friends – the surviving American elm that looks like a frozen geyser as it towers above the other trees, the dying butternuts in disarray, the wolf pines, the sturdy black cherries, and, of course, the centenarian sugar maples.

Adam Silver stands looking out of a window in a Brattleboro apartment.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As companies like Uber and Airbnb continue growing across Vermont, two new state laws to better regulate the "gig economy" are now in effect. 

Mike Sullivan is general manager of Hardwick Electric.
John Dillon / VPR

Small electric utilities around Vermont are concerned their customers will face higher bills to pay for a boom in solar projects. Last month, the utilities complained to regulators about the subsidies they have to pay for certain solar projects.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh looks at notes during the third day of his confirmation hearings on Capitol Hill.
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

It's day four of the Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearings on the U.S. Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

My mother, Mary Broderick, served on my Connecticut hometown’s Board of Education for years, eventually serving at the state and national level. It was inspiring, but I still sometimes wondered if the cause was worth the cost - because it’s hard to do a job that doesn’t pay well and requires time away from your family even when you love it.

Two lamprey out of water
bit245 / iStock

Rivers on the New York side of Lake Champlain will be treated with chemical pesticides this fall in an effort to control parasitic sea lamprey.

Vice President Mike Pence standing at the American Legion 100th National Convention in Minneapolis.
Jim Mone / Associated Press

As of Friday afternoon, Vice President Mike Pence is reportedly in Vermont. Air Force Two was seen landing at the Burlington International Airport around 1:30 p.m.

More than 6,000 Salvadorans living in Massachusetts with temporary immigration status face potential deportation next year, when the humanitarian program allowing them to live in the U.S. expires.

We recently visited the government center in San Salvador where many recently deported Salvadorans re-enter the country — a country some of them haven’t called home in years.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, left, and Sen. John McCain, talk during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington in March 2017. Russian opposition politician Vladimir Kara-Murza, with his wife Evgenia Kara-Murza, are to the right.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

Arizona Sen. John McCain died Saturday, Aug. 25, at 81, and all this week the passing of the former naval airman, Vietnam veteran, senator and past presidential nominee has been marked with ceremonies and memorials from Arizona to Washington, D.C.

Many of McCain's Congressional colleagues have reflected on his life and career, including Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy, who worked alongside McCain for 32 years in the U.S. Senate.

A three-panel picture with downtown scenes from Barre City, Montpelier in winter, and the roundabout in Winooski.
Left to right: Steve Zind, Kirk Carapezza, Angela Evancie / VPR

This week, the Vermont chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union sent letters to six cities and towns demanding they repeal local ordinances that ban panhandling. 

Stephan Savoia / Associated Press

The death of Senator John McCain is a watershed moment for the United States and especially for the national security community. To the countless obituaries that will be written for him I should like to add a personal anecdote.

Rep. Kiah Morris, left, speaks at a podium during a Statehouse press conference about a racial justice bill back in March.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR File

Bennington Rep. Kiah Morris is speaking up about her decision not to seek re-election — and she said being the target of hate both online and in the real world played a factor in her decision to withdraw her candidacy. 

The Vermont GOP elected 5 candidates Wednesday for the general election ballot. They are, from left, Rick Kenyon for auditor; Rick Morton for treasurer; Janssen Willhoit for attorney general; Anya Tynio for U.S. House; Lawrence Zupan for U.S. Senate.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Vermont sets aside the second Tuesday in August for its primary elections, but the Vermont GOP had to wait until Wednesday night to find out who would represent the party in some of the most important statewide offices during the general election.

Marijuana plants.
gaspr13 / iStock

Supporters of a retail cannabis market in Vermont have a powerful new ally in their corner, as the Vermont Democratic Party has formally endorsed the creation of a taxed-and-regulated system for marijuana sales.

Jim Condon speaking at Montpelier's Capitol Plaza Hotel.
Condon For Colchester website

Jim Condon, a prominent Vermont broadcaster and state representative for Colchester, died last week from esophageal cancer. He was 60 years old.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Nearly identical appeals come from both Left and Right. “Only your contribution NOW can stop Brett Kavanaugh from savaging your rights!” Or, “Only your contribution NOW can stop those who would stop Brett Kavanaugh from protecting your rights!”

Winooski and Montpelier are exploring provisions that would allow their residents who aren't U.S. citizens to vote in local elections.
Jessamyn West / Flickr

There was a time when non-U.S. citizens could vote in elections where they resided in this country. But anti-immigrant feelings in the late 19th and early 20th century changed that. Winooski and Montpelier are now exploring ways to allowing their non-citizen residents to vote in local elections.

Pages