Government & Politics

House Minority Leader Don Turner (R-Milton) is seeking the office of Lieutenant Governor in Vermont's Nov. 6 general election.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Republican Don Turner represents Milton in the Vermont legislature, and now the House Minority Leader is running for Lieutenant Governor in the Nov. 6 general election. We're talking to the candidate about why he's seeking the state's second-highest office.

sheriff's hat  hanging on the wall
Emily Corwin / VPR

When you think of lucrative jobs in small states like Vermont, sheriff probably doesn't come to mind. But Seven Days reporter Alicia Freese found that some local law enforcement officers are doing a lot better than you might expect, which she wrote about in her recent article “For Vermont's Sheriffs, Policing Is a Lucrative Business.”

dkfielding / iStock

Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation process has been notable, if only for the number of times the word “unprecedented” has been used to describe it.

Molly Kelly won the Democratic gubernatorial primary in New Hampshire Tuesday night.
Elise Amendola / AP

Tuesday, voters in New Hampshire went to the polls in the state’s primary election. Now the stage is set for several major races in the Granite State, including the contest for governor and both of the state's seats in the U.S House.

Updated at 10:52 p.m. ET

Democrats backed by the state's political establishment rolled to victory in New Hampshire's primary Tuesday night, besting more progressive, outsider challengers in both the House and governor's races.

The most closely-watched and crowded race came in the state's open 1st congressional district, where New Hampshire Executive Councilor Chris Pappas topped the 11-way field.

From left: Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, Rep. Peter Welch and Agency of Human Services Secretary Al Gobeille at a Montpelier press conference on Tuesday announcing their support for an expanded Medicaid fraud bill.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Rep. Peter Welch said he's optimistic that his bipartisan bill that expands the authority of state Medicaid Fraud Units will soon be passed by Congress — and Vermont officials say the bill will give them greater ability to investigate a wide range of fraud cases.

Bennington Rep. Kiah Morris, right, withdrew from her reelection campaign last month. Morris says racial harassment in her home district became too much for her family to bear.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR file

Many Vermonters were shocked last month when the state’s only African-American female lawmaker announced that, after years of racial harassment, she was withdrawing from her re-election campaign.

Tabitha Pohl-Moore, the Vermont director of the NAACP, was less surprised.

Carter: Lawsuit

Sep 11, 2018

Vermont’s consumer protection laws are some of the strongest in the country. Intended to protect consumers from unfair or deceptive business practices, these laws are vital for both consumers and business because they protect fair competition in the marketplace. They prevent consumers from being deceived and also maintain honest rules for economic competition.

Vermont's current use program allows working forest and agricultrual land to be taxed at a much lower rate.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press/File

In 1980, the state rolled out a program that would allow agricultural and forest land to be taxed for its use rather than its market value. The current use program has gone through some changes over its almost-four-decade life. Vermont Edition explains the complexities of current use.

Newport on Lake Memphremagog
John Dillon / VPR

The small Northeast Kingdom city of Newport has its economic hopes pegged to a long-neglected asset: Lake Memphremagog.

An illustration of a hand holding bills of money.
MHJ / iStock

In recent election cycles, super PACs have sought to influence electoral contests from the governor on down in Vermont — and 2018 is proving to be no exception.

An OxyContin bottle with pills arranged around it.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

Vermont has became the latest state to file suit against Purdue Pharma, the Connecticut-based drugmaker that manufactures the opioid painkiller OxyContin.

The way villains are portrayed in fiction may help shape political views. We're talking about that, and other ways that entertainment can affect ideology.
Roger Murmann / flickr

Our politics and ideology are shaped by our upbringing and life experience, but a UVM political scientist says there may be another key component to what we believe and who we vote for: the fictional stories we're exposed to in books, movies, and television. We're talking about how entertainment can shape our politics - from Game of Thrones to House of Cards and The Hunger Games

Charles Dharapak / Associated Press

I met John McCain several times. In fact, in 2008 I spent January in New Hampshire campaigning for him - hard.

Bill Schubart

I love working in the woods and I’ve come to know all the great trees on our land. They’re like friends – the surviving American elm that looks like a frozen geyser as it towers above the other trees, the dying butternuts in disarray, the wolf pines, the sturdy black cherries, and, of course, the centenarian sugar maples.

Adam Silver stands looking out of a window in a Brattleboro apartment.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As companies like Uber and Airbnb continue growing across Vermont, two new state laws to better regulate the "gig economy" are now in effect. 

Mike Sullivan is general manager of Hardwick Electric.
John Dillon / VPR

Small electric utilities around Vermont are concerned their customers will face higher bills to pay for a boom in solar projects. Last month, the utilities complained to regulators about the subsidies they have to pay for certain solar projects.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh looks at notes during the third day of his confirmation hearings on Capitol Hill.
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

For coverage of the Sept. 27 testimony of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh, click here.

It's day four of the Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearings on the U.S. Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

My mother, Mary Broderick, served on my Connecticut hometown’s Board of Education for years, eventually serving at the state and national level. It was inspiring, but I still sometimes wondered if the cause was worth the cost - because it’s hard to do a job that doesn’t pay well and requires time away from your family even when you love it.

Two lamprey out of water
bit245 / iStock

Rivers on the New York side of Lake Champlain will be treated with chemical pesticides this fall in an effort to control parasitic sea lamprey.

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