Green Mountain Care Board

The Green Mountain Care Board has approved a proposal that it hopes will revolutionize how health care providers are reimbursed in Vermont.

Jessa Barnard
Erin Mansfield / For VPR

A key medical group says doctors do not have enough representation in health care oversight, and will take its case to the Vermont Legislature.

The Green Mountain Care Board is now under the direction of Kevin Mullin, a former Rutland state senator.
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After Al Gobeille was selected to lead Vermont's Agency of Human Services, Rutland State Sen. Kevin Mullin was chosen to succeed Gobeille as chairman of the Green Mountain Care Board.

We're talking with Mullin about a payment reform plan the board is considering that changes how health care providers are reimbursed.

Green Mountain Care Board Chairman Kevin Mullin says the state needs to attach tighter strings to public money being received by Vermont Information Technology Leaders.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR File

The chairman of the Green Mountain Care Board says he wants to see “meaningful changes” in “staff and operations” at the private organization creating electronic medical records for the Vermont health care system.

Green Mountain Care Board Chairman Kevin Mullin says the state needs to attach tighter strings to public money being received by Vermont Information Technology Leaders.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR File

The Green Mountain Care Board recently released detailed financial information for hospital administrators and top-paid physicians throughout the state. The report shows that the average pay for hospital CEOs was roughly $600,000, and in some cases, large bonuses were also paid out.

Vermont's shortage of primary care doctors will soon get worse because a number of them will retire in the next few years.
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Many states across the country have a need to attract more primary care physicians, but Vermont's situation has an additional twist - a sizeable number of the state's primary care doctors are expected to retire in the next few years.

Green Mountain Care Board Chairman Kevin Mullin says the state needs to attach tighter strings to public money being received by Vermont Information Technology Leaders.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR File

State regulators have ratcheted down the premium increases sought by the Vermont’s largest private health insurer, but one key official says rate hikes for next year’s plans will still be “ridiculously high.”

Chief Health Care Advocate Mike Fisher, center, says a new "calculator," developed by his office, will spotlight  the financial hardships faced by Vermont families trying to buy health insurance.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/file

Consumer pushback against proposed rate hikes for health insurance premiums might persuade state regulators to lower the increases, according to Vermont's chief health care advocate.

Green Mountain Surgery Center in Colchester will be Vermont's first independent surgical center. State regulators have approved construction of the facility despite protest from nonprofit hospitals.
xmee / iStock

State regulators have approved construction of what would be Vermont’s first independent surgical center, despite protests from nonprofit hospitals who say the venture will siphon needed revenue away from their operating rooms.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont has asked Vermont regulators to approve a 12.7 percent rate increase for insurance coverage starting in 2018, and MVP is requesting a 6.7 percent increase in rates.

Senate lawmakers voted unanimously Thursday to confirm Robin Lunge to the Green Mountain Care Board, despite legal concerns from Gov. Phil Scott that her appointment may have been tainted by a clerical error.

Toby Talbot / AP file

An apparent clerical error by the administration of former Gov. Peter Shumlin has jeopardized the tenure of one of his highest-profile appointments to the Green Mountain Care Board.

The Green Mountain Care Board on Wednesday approved a plan that will dramatically change how health care providers are reimbursed in Vermont.

The U.S. Supreme Court has issued a ruling that could stall health care reform efforts in the Green Mountains.

Toby Talbot / AP

State officials say they're hopeful that a new health care payment system can be in place at the beginning of next year. The proposal is designed to reimburse providers to keep their patients healthy and to encourage the expansion of primary care practices.

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The Green Mountain Care Board oversees the state's effort to overhaul Vermont's health care system. There is one physician who serves on that board, and he says Vermont is approaching a crisis in primary care.

Dr. Allan Ramsay explains why and discusses some of the options that the state must weigh to deal with the problem.

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Big data is all the rage these days, especially in the world of health care. And as Vermont looks to compile a massive repository of insurance claims information, it’s become a legal testing ground for the future of health reform nationally. 

Bob Kinzel / VPR file

State officials say the likely demise of a single payer health care system doesn't mean that the 2015 Legislature won't take significant steps to make health care more accessible and more affordable for many Vermonters. 

Now that Gov. Peter Shumlin has decided not to pursue a single payer health care plan in 2015, the development of a comprehensive payment reform system will likely become one of the top priorities in the coming year. Some state officials think this plan could have a major impact on efforts to control future health care costs.

A new study shows a wide variation in how much Vermont's primary care physicians are paid for basic service. The information could play a key role in the development of a comprehensive payment reform system in the future.  


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