Green Mountain Power

The board responsible for regulating utility prices in Vermont is ordering a review of the state’s utility regulation system in Vermont, including the controversial regulatory model used by Green Mountain Power and Vermont Gas Systems for much of the past decade.

Green Mountain Power is asking Vermont regulators to approve a 4.98 percent rate increase for customers starting in January 2018.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

A recent report commissioned by the Vermont Attorney General’s office says the system of “alternative regulation” used by Green Mountain Power for 10 years failed to hold the utility fully accountable for its spending, and customers suffered the consequences.

A recent report commissioned by the Vermont Attorney General’s office says the system of “Alternative Regulation” used by Green Mountain Power didn't hold the utility accountable for its spending — and customers are suffering the consequences.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The passing of the federal Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act has been in the news because it authorizes millions of dollars to address the water crisis in Flint, Mich. But the legislation may also help pay for repairs to an historic Vermont dam.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR File

Green Mountain Power, the state’s largest electric utility, is dropping the “alternative regulation” system it has used since 2007 in favor of traditional rate regulation.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR File

Green Mountain Power will collect millions of dollars from customers over the next year as reimbursement for costs that the company didn’t properly document for regulators, records show.

Adela Suliman / AP

The implications of the British vote to leave the European Union are far-reaching in the global economy, but Green Mountain Power customers might be surprised to hear that the vote is affecting them too: It will mean cheaper rates for them next year.

Nina Keck / VPR File

Green Mountain Power is the only electric company in the state using "Alternative Regulation" for its customer rates, and a VPR investigation found that regulators have allowed the company to collect millions of dollars from customers to cover costs that didn't meet the regulators' own standards.

Regulators have decided to take a close look at three of Green Mountain Power's newest programs to see how much value they bring to customers.

Regulatory filings this week show Green Mountain Power is purchasing 17 new hydroelectric dams to add to its generation portfolio, but state regulators aren't sure the dams are a smart buy.

The state's largest utility says a new rate program will allow customers to save money while helping the utility to cut demand for electricity.

If you live in Vermont, there's a good chance your electric bill will go up a bit this fall. State regulators at the Department of Public Service have approved a rate increase for Green Mountain Power, the state's largest utility.

The state is allowing Vermont’s largest utility to continue accepting community-scale solar projects. Last fall Green Mountain Power hit the cap, maxing out how many of these types of solar projects can be hooked up to the grid.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

As our reliance on solar and wind energy grows, so does the challenge of reliability: The wind and sun can’t be turned on and off whenever people need electricity. One part of the solution is energy storage. 

Green Mountain Power/Google Maps

In addition to making milk, Vermont’s dairy cows create a lot of manure. And what to do with that waste can sometimes be a challenge.

GMP

Green Mountain Power officials say its now official: Rutland is the solar generation capital of New England.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

All this week, jackhammers have been destroying a small dam on the Wells River in Groton. The dam was built in 1908 to power Groton homes but it’s been useless since it was damaged by the 1927 flood.

mgkaya / iStock.com

Some good news Friday for customers of Green Mountain Power, the state's largest electric utility. The company has agreed to lower rates starting in October by .76 percent.

Toby Talcott / AP

The Federal Trade Commission has decided not to open up an investigation into allegations of deceptive advertising at Vermont’s largest electric utility. But the FTC is asking Green Mountain Power to be more careful about its communications with customers in the future.

Pages