Green Mountain Power

Utilities like Burlington Electric are asking customers to turn off unnecessary lights and limit energy use during the hottest part of the day to conserve energy during this week's heat wave.
michaelmjc / iStock

In addition to creating personal discomfort, this week's heat wave is having an effect on how local utility companies opperate.

A close up of blue numeral buttons on a phone.
Andy Nowack / iStock

Vermont businesses are being warned of another round of phone scams by callers claiming to be from utility companies. The scammers tell you that you haven't paid your bill and give you a 1-800 number to straighten things out.

Dozens watched as crews began tearing down a dilapitated house in Rutland Monday. Green Mountain Power is teaming up with officials in Rutland and many local businesses to build a brand new energy efficient home that will be given away in a new contest.
Nina Keck / VPR

In Rutland, demolition crews began tearing down a dilapidated three-story dwelling which will soon be replaced with a brand-new 1,500-square foot, energy-efficient New England-style farmhouse.

And if all goes according to plan, it’ll be given away to a lucky winner in a nationwide contest.

Green Mountain Power has received a state permit to build a commercial Tesla battery storage system in Panton.

A lineman from Burlington Electric Department repairs downed wires on a transmission line in Williston Tuesday.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Thousands of Vermont households and businesses are still without power days after Sunday night's fierce windstorm. Green Mountain Power and other electric co-ops say they're making progress restoring power, but caution frustrated customers that the wait for power to return could last into the weekend.

A tree downed on a powerline in Monkton, Vermont. Thousands of homes and buisnesses have been without power since wind storms hit the region on Sunday.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

More than 150,000 Vermonters were without electricity Monday after severe winds felled power lines across the state, and utility officials say it could be days before some homes and businesses have the power back on.

Green Mountain Power wants to build Vermont's second commercial renewable energy storage battery near its solar array in Panton.

A consultant hired by the state says the majority of Green Mountain Power's planned system investments haven't been properly regulated. The result is a $73 million disagreement between the state and the utility.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR File

As regulators decide 2018 electric rates for Green Mountain Power customers, a disagreement between the state and GMP raises a $73 million question about regulation of Vermont's largest electric utility.

The board responsible for regulating utility prices in Vermont is ordering a review of the state’s utility regulation system in Vermont, including the controversial regulatory model used by Green Mountain Power and Vermont Gas Systems for much of the past decade.

Green Mountain Power is asking Vermont regulators to approve a 4.98 percent rate increase for customers starting in January 2018.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

A recent report commissioned by the Vermont Attorney General’s office says the system of “alternative regulation” used by Green Mountain Power for 10 years failed to hold the utility fully accountable for its spending, and customers suffered the consequences.

A recent report commissioned by the Vermont Attorney General’s office says the system of “Alternative Regulation” used by Green Mountain Power didn't hold the utility accountable for its spending — and customers are suffering the consequences.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The passing of the federal Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act has been in the news because it authorizes millions of dollars to address the water crisis in Flint, Mich. But the legislation may also help pay for repairs to an historic Vermont dam.

A consultant hired by the state says the majority of Green Mountain Power's planned system investments haven't been properly regulated. The result is a $73 million disagreement between the state and the utility.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR File

Green Mountain Power, the state’s largest electric utility, is dropping the “alternative regulation” system it has used since 2007 in favor of traditional rate regulation.

A consultant hired by the state says the majority of Green Mountain Power's planned system investments haven't been properly regulated. The result is a $73 million disagreement between the state and the utility.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR File

Green Mountain Power will collect millions of dollars from customers over the next year as reimbursement for costs that the company didn’t properly document for regulators, records show.

Adela Suliman / AP

The implications of the British vote to leave the European Union are far-reaching in the global economy, but Green Mountain Power customers might be surprised to hear that the vote is affecting them too: It will mean cheaper rates for them next year.

Nina Keck / VPR File

Green Mountain Power is the only electric company in the state using "Alternative Regulation" for its customer rates, and a VPR investigation found that regulators have allowed the company to collect millions of dollars from customers to cover costs that didn't meet the regulators' own standards.

Regulators have decided to take a close look at three of Green Mountain Power's newest programs to see how much value they bring to customers.

Regulatory filings this week show Green Mountain Power is purchasing 17 new hydroelectric dams to add to its generation portfolio, but state regulators aren't sure the dams are a smart buy.

The state's largest utility says a new rate program will allow customers to save money while helping the utility to cut demand for electricity.

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