Gunshots Series

Since Vermont started collecting data in 1994 the number of domestic violence related homicides, as a percentage of all homicides, has been dropping.

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Commentator Maggie Brown Cassidy had this to say.

VPR's Gunshots project explores the role of guns in life - and death - in Vermont through commentary, data and in depth reporting. We'll discuss the data and hear from you.
Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

This week, VPR has been presenting a project called Gunshots — our team compiled and analyzed data from every recorded gun death in the state over six years. VPR's Taylor Dobbs joins us to discuss the project, and the data.

From 2011 through 2016, the majority of gun deaths in Vermont were suicides. Public health professionals are working to reduce that number by encoraging people to safely store their firearms using gun locks and safes.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR Photo Illustration

An analysis of gun deaths in Vermont over a six-year period showed that 89 percent of those deaths were suicides. Public health experts say they aren't surprised by that number and are trying to find ways to reduce it.

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Hannah Rommer grew up in Southern Vermont. Now, she's a music teacher and Orchestra conductor in Hanover, New Hampshire and reached out to us to share her story.

Henry Epp / VPR

In Vermont, of all the deaths by gunshot wounds in the last six years, more than a quarter were suicides by current or former members of the armed forces. Even though Veterans Affairs knows that soldiers are at greater risk of taking their own lives, it’s difficult to intervene successfully.

Now, one Vermont mom who lost her son has made it her mission to end veteran suicide.

Vermont Suicide Prevention Center Director Joelle Tarallo says feelings of connection are very important in preventing suicide.
PeopleImages / iStock

According to the Vermont Department of Mental Health, the suicide rate in Vermont has increased over the past 10 years. In 2014, according to the department’s data, there were more than 17 suicides per 100,000 Vermonters. The New York Times reported that the national average that year was 13 suicides per 100,000 people.

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Last year, Commentator Deborah Lee Luskin became a licensed hunter and bought her first gun after decades of never wanting one.

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Robin Earle, a 28-year-old graphic designer living in Milton, shared these thoughts.

Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

From Jan. 1, 2011 to the end of December, 2016, 420 people died in Vermont from gunshot wounds. The majority of those people died by suicide. For the Gunshots project, VPR created a database of all 420 of those deaths in an effort to better understand the issue of gun deaths in Vermont.

VPR compiled a database of all of the gun deaths in the state of Vermont between the beginning of 2011 and the end of 2016. The database has information about every person who died by gunshot during that period: including age, veteran status, marital status, education level and other details that can help Vermonters better understand which parts of their community are most affected by gun deaths.

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Greg Schoppe a web developer living in Burlington shared these thoughts.